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SAT
APR 7, 2012


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‘Hide/Seek’

Why: Conflicts over art have been recorded going back at least to the eighth century. The 21st has had several already, including the Catholic League dustup over a video involving ants crawling over a crucifix by David Wojnarowicz in the exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture—the first major museum exhibition designed to reveal the gayness embedded in the canon of American art. Walk through the show (which is much subtler than its critics’ protest), then check out part one of a lecture series on art controversies through history. (Tacoma Art Museum; 1701 Pacific Ave, Tacoma, www.tacomaartmuseum.org; exhibit 10 am–5 pm, lecture 1 pm; $10 museum admission, $15 lecture)



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Washington Artisan Cheesemakers Festival

Why: This festus of cheese showcases the food, the philosophy, and the people who love it. Learn firsthand from Washington’s premier curdmongers about their craft, then sample the fruit (dairy?) of their labors. Admission includes infinity cheese samples plus three beer/wine/hard-cider tastes (with more available for purchase), as well as bites of locally made bread, crackers, honey, and jam. It all benefits the Cascade Harvest Coalition. (Seattle Design Center, 5701 Sixth Ave S, www.washingtonartisancheese.com, noon–6 pm, $35 adv/$40 DOS, 21+)

SUN
APR 8, 2012


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‘Jiro Dreams of Sushi’

Why: Jiro Ono is 85 years old. He still works at his sushi bar—10 seats, located in a basement next to a Tokyo subway station, recipient of three Michelin stars—every day. His commitment to his craft—to being a shokunin, to striving for impossible perfection—is complete. “It has to be better than last time,” Jiro says of his sushi, and he means every time, day after day after day. The filmmakers behind this documentary show this truth in everything that Jiro says and does, in every glossy and yielding piece of fish shown, in the important matter of rice. You must see Jiro Dreams of Sushi. (See Movie Times)

MON
APR 9, 2012


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Radiohead

Why: It’s a rare occasion in music writing that superlatives are justified. Radiohead is one of them. Starting with OK Computer and never stopping, Radiohead have defined—via music—a generation, if not a century, of the human experience. Don’t like The King of Limbs? Listen to it in a year and deny its brilliance. Who else articulates the tedium, isolation, and chaos of modern urban life with such precision? Answer: no one. (KeyArena, Seattle Center, www.ticketmaster.com, 7:30 pm, $66.50, all ages)

TUE
APR 10, 2012


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‘Scarface’ Shoot-Along

Why: The only thing better than watching Scarface is watching Scarface with a cap gun. That’s right: This is your only opportunity to see the movie that launched a million rap careers in glorious shoot-o-rama. You’re issued a cap gun and caps at the door, and then every time the movie erupts in gunfire, you’re encouraged to fire your pistol at the screen. By the time Al Pacino’s climactic gun battle closes out the film, the theater will be cloaked in a blanket of sulfurous smoke and the satisfaction of a job well done. (SIFF Cinema at the Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave N, www.siff.net, 7 pm, $10)

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WED
APR 11, 2012


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Sister Spit

Why: Beloved queer performance ensemble Sister Spit always brings the thunder. Brilliant poet/memoirist/sex symbol/ringmaster Michelle Tea has toured the group in countless iterations, with hundreds of quality readers and performers, but tonight’s reading is extra special. Besides not-to-be-missed presentations from Brontez Purnell, Cassie J. Sneider, and Erin Markey, this is the Sister Spit debut of living legend Dorothy Allison, whose coming-of-age story Bastard out of Carolina genuinely changes lives. (Other performers include Stranger Genius Rebecca Brown and Stranger writer/Last Days columnist David Schmader. We like them, too.) (Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave, 322-7030, 8 pm, $20)



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‘The Salt of Life’

Why: What Gianni Di Gregorio’s The Salt of Life shares with his previous film, Mid-August Lunch, is a sense of life’s lightness. Lunch was about a middle-aged man, played by the director, who becomes a granny-sitter to pay the bills. The new film is about the same man, now older and dealing with something he didn’t expect to find in his later years—sexual desire. His financial situation still sucks, he is slower, a little sadder. But life must go on, and it does. (See Movie Times)

THU
APR 12, 2012


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Elvis Costello and the Imposters

Why: No one does the greatest-hits extravaganza like Elvis Costello. In addition to a sturdy band of Imposters, Costello’s 2012 Revolver Tour features the return of the Spectacular Spinning Songbook, an honest-to-God Wheel of Fortune–style contraption emblazoned with song titles drawn from across Costello’s 35-year career and spun by lucky audience members. Whatever song comes up, the band bangs out. No two shows are the same, and all of them are great. (My top mama-needs-a-new-pair-of-shoes song hopefuls: “New Lace Sleeves” [1981], “I Want You” [1986], “Lipstick Vogue” [1978].) (Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St, www.stgpresents.org, 8 pm, $35.75–$75.75, all ages)

FRI
APR 13, 2012


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‘The Cabin in the Woods’

Why: Honestly, the less you know about The Cabin in the Woods before you watch it, the better off you are. The basics: Sexy young people—a stoner, a jock, a sex kitten, a nerd, and a virgin—take a vacation. Then things go wrong. Lots of things. Everything. Imagine every horror movie you’ve ever seen played on the screen at the same time, and you’re getting warm. But this isn’t some smirky, Scream-style, self-aware cuddlefest—it’s a genuinely scary movie. Toss a delightful performance from Bradley Whitford in there, and you’ve got everything you should know. (See Movie Times)

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