Aug 17 d.p. commented on Guest Editorial: What Reuven Carlyle Got Wrong in His Critique of ST3.
Oh, please.

Carlyle's expression of frustration is muddled, but the source of his gut hesitation is clear: $54 billion is a gargantuan fuckload of money, and any expenditure so whopping should be properly vetted for efficacy, in light of the fact that money does not grow on trees.

The pro-ST3 camp's facile insistence that trains are an inherent good, no matter where they go, does not remotely qualify as an argument, much less a vetted one.
Aug 12 d.p. commented on The Morning News: University of Washington Station Is The Epicenter of Seattle's Transportation Future, Turbulence on a Motherfucking Plane.
Heaven forbid, @10!

You might wind up with a little more "Amsterdam" and a little less "General Motors Pavilion at the World's Fair".

After years and years and years of Seattle living, I still cannot understand the blind boosterism that insists incredible mediocrity (a poorly-designed subway carrying only 30,000 trips per day on its "most important segment that will ever be built") or outright badness (the Montlake overpass) becomes an epicenter of awesome simply by being in Seattle.

Do some damned research. Advocate with a healthy incredulity. Do better.
Aug 12 d.p. commented on The Morning News: University of Washington Station Is The Epicenter of Seattle's Transportation Future, Turbulence on a Motherfucking Plane.
No, @8, the "best" solution would have been a more sensibly-located station.

The second-best solution would have been a primary underground egress that emerged on the west side of Montlake, which for a station at such depth would have been easily doable without adding to (and possibly reducing) both access time and construction cost.

The third-best solution would have been a goddamned crosswalk.

In fact, cities with far less egregiously located and exponentially better-patronized transit infrastructure have been replacing hare-brained mid-century skybridges with improved street-level access for years now.

But no one in Seattle seems to have gotten the memo.
Aug 12 d.p. commented on The Morning News: University of Washington Station Is The Epicenter of Seattle's Transportation Future, Turbulence on a Motherfucking Plane.
Ugh. Do Seattle's self-defined capital-U 'Urbanists' even care to understand anything about urbanity?

There's a reason that the world's better cities are tearing down monstrous overpasses that send pedestrians hundreds of weather-exposed feet out of the way so as to spare drivers from having to acknowledge their existence.

Only in Seattle would anyone build such aerial overkill anew, declare it the primary access route to a billion-dollar subway investment 8 stories below ground (because that makes sense), place it all in a location with no streetscape to speak of, and then laud it as "the future" of urban anything!

*(The various interrelated fields of urban sociology, planning, and study have long demanded the patient exercise of evidence-based research that straddles the hard and soft sciences and is particularly attentive to how human psychology reacts to cues of the built environment. But apparently now it's just a stupid, meaningless one-word clique signifier in a Twitter bio.)
Jun 23 d.p. commented on Touki Bouki Is a Mind-Blowing Afro-Funk Experiment.
Hyenas is an superb film, but Touki Bouki is one of the great jawdroppers in all of cinematic history. It is the rare formally-audacious film that feels no need to flaunt its intellectual achievements, because it's too busy setting gleeful fire to all possible postcolonial ideologies simultaneously. And somehow, through all the brashness and cynicism, the protagonist couple's youthful passions and strivings feel authentic and relatable and universal.

It is an astounding film.

That said, though it has never fallen out of print or respect, Touki Bouki does seem to have "a famous white patron" in the form of Martin Scorsese, who funded its recent restoration and broader distribution.

Jun 21 d.p. commented on Sound Transit Doesn't Need to Cut Down on Marketing Costs: It Needs to Spend More.
Sorry, Charles.

When 2040 comes, and you take all your New York and London friends on a Link field trip to Alaska Junction, they're still going to laugh at you.

Urban vibrancy is about substance, not symbols.
Jun 14 d.p. commented on How Seattle Took Forever to Build a Very Fast Light Rail Line.
You may be the first blind booster to attempt to defend Fife, Issaquah, Interbay, and the Duwamish Delta as some sort of planners' dream of effective, meticulously-researched, geometrically-vetted rapid transit.

Most of your peers simply defend the above as "immutable politics", which is of course a complete abdication of advocacy, on top of being a shitty rationale for 50 years of infrastructural hock.

But between your gleeful ST3 Pollyanna-ism and your offensive insistence on conflating any inconvenient-but-fact-based caveats with your "anti-transit" bogeymen, you may yet prove yourself the dumbest "advocate" ever to waste everyone's time on this subject.
Jun 14 d.p. commented on How Seattle Took Forever to Build a Very Fast Light Rail Line.
I'm sure they're equally grateful for your flippant treatment of $54 billion in debt service for astoundingly limited mobility outcomes.

Hint: Insisting on the pursuit of best practices in both operations and network design is about the least that any self-appointed advocate should expect of him/herself.
Jun 14 d.p. commented on How Seattle Took Forever to Build a Very Fast Light Rail Line.
Yup, Cressona's gotta be in Fife lickety-split!

If you live in First Hill or commute to Fremont, well, sucks to be you.
Jun 6 d.p. commented on Sound Transit Board Approves Changes to ST3 to Speed Up Light Rail Projects.
And Pridge, politics interferes with East Coast infrastructure all the time, and always has.

But I dare you to show any New Yorker your $54 billion plan to solve very few problems for very few Seattleites. Once their multiple heart attacks have subsided, they'll tell you about their crippling system-wide maintenance backlog that could be wiped away for a fraction of that. They'll tell you about the decades-delayed Second Avenue Subway, which could be finished (one end of the island to the other) for about 1/3 of that. And they'll tell you about the impending catastrophic failure of the Hudson River tunnels, whose replacements could be underway for about 35% of that.

All of New York City's most pressing transit troubles could be solved for the same $54 billion that you would have Seattle spend building a one-stop subway to The Tiny-Ass Junction, a sprawling line to an "airport" with less than one dozen potential commercial flights per day, alongside a sprawling, pedestrian-inaccessible factory owned by a company perpetually threatening to flee, and some random part of not-quite-Issaquah with no valid reason to expect job growth and a present residential population of zero.

No "politics" could ever fix that level of waste and stupid.
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