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Will in Seattle 1
Technically, you can't stem the rising tide.

Most of that is already baked in until at least 2040, no matter what we do now.

But ... we could work on dark carbon, for example, or stop building GHG multiplying Tunnels Of Carbon Doom that move fewer vehicles for twice the total systemic carbon emissions in construction and operation.

Most GHG emissions in this city are actually from suburbanites commuting here. People living in cities near their work have much lower carbon profiles per capita, even if they eat steaks, dress in leather, and drive low mpg sports cars.
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on January 17, 2013 at 12:20 PM · Report this
2
Yowza, this is a wonky survey!
Posted by Foonken2 on January 17, 2013 at 12:33 PM · Report this
Catalina Vel-DuRay 3
Oh No! All of West Seattle will be submerged? (seriously, they are whinier than even Ballard)
Posted by Catalina Vel-DuRay http://www.danlangdon.com on January 17, 2013 at 12:33 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 4
Nothing about putting utility cables under ground in water proof and earquake proof casing? Nothing about penalizing single occupancy vehicles driving in Seattle. Nothing about vastly expanding our bus service with electric busses?

Seattle Government...we want to cure cancer with happy thoughts and a Tylenol
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on January 17, 2013 at 12:38 PM · Report this
Will in Seattle 5
@4 there is a comments section on each section's page. Use that.

Oh, and put the Tylenol between your legs.
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on January 17, 2013 at 12:52 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 6
@5, Trust me I used the comment section on each part of the stupid little survey. Not like it will ever be read
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on January 17, 2013 at 12:58 PM · Report this
Catalina Vel-DuRay 7
How does putting utility lines underground going to help combat climate change? If anything, it would add tons of carbon into the atmosphere with all the heavy equipment required to do that work, and the decades it would take to accomplish it.

As far as this survey goes, they apparently have an issue with the trolley buses. Who knew?

Posted by Catalina Vel-DuRay http://www.danlangdon.com on January 17, 2013 at 1:28 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 8
@7, think about it during the next wind storm. Climate change means more extreme weather (heavier wind as one example) and more downed power lines as an example. And it works very well in downtown Seattle.

I know you have a problem with me Catalina Vel-DuRay but really do try to think before going on your attack.
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on January 17, 2013 at 2:31 PM · Report this
Catalina Vel-DuRay 9
Cato dear, don't look now, but your paranoia is showing. I have no problem with you. I just asked a question.

I'll ask again - how would undergrounding utility lines help with climate change? I understand your point about how it would mitigate damage during windstorms, but it is far cheaper to just keep up with tree trimming - lines in trees are what causes most of the wind-related outages.

If you don't like the wires, that's fine. It is prettier when they are underground. But don't try to greenwash your aesthetics.

Posted by Catalina Vel-DuRay http://www.danlangdon.com on January 17, 2013 at 3:48 PM · Report this
10
The options in that survey show just how fucked the city government here is. What a bunch of eco-faking posers they are.
Posted by Mister G on January 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM · Report this
11
Do you want to 'survive' the impacts of climate change or try and stop it? I think that survival is on the table at the municipal level, the larger issues we should all be part of pushing.

Go with the flow and don't try and build too much against it. Get thee to higher ground, and admit that those watersheds the city has been hiding (noted by hired engineering consultants and removed from the published reports - at least one I know of under the Nickels regime) ARE watersheds, can create landslides and flooding and deal with that.

Putting solar panels on every home would render the need for underground power lines mostly moot. We DO get solar power even on a cloudy day. Having power storage capacity would augment. Unlike almost every other place where a private-public partnership holds the citizens hostage to centralized 'profit' motives, we are uniquely positioned to make distributed power creation happen.
Make the following within actual reach for me- roof of solar panels and rain gardens and a cistern to catch the rest of the rainwater and I will be happy. I WILL pay for a lot of it, problem is I can't get a loan for more than half the cost of solar panels, even though I know the future savings and tax exemptions will pay it off.

Stop adding so much to the greenhouse gasses by rehabbing and repurposing as much as possible. Building tear downs have more impact on the environment than any 5 star LEED structure replacing the torn down structure. This is why I did not respond on the survey to encourage ANY suggestions that 'smelled' of building incentives. If you have to build, especially in our climate, passivhaus has got to be the way to go.
Posted by Just Looking on January 18, 2013 at 1:27 AM · Report this
Will in Seattle 12
You do realize Australia is literally burning, with temps so high they had to create a higher temperature gradient for their temp maps, right, @10?
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on January 18, 2013 at 1:32 AM · Report this
13
#12, what does that have to do with Seattle's totally fucked city government and its eco fakery?
Posted by Mister G on January 18, 2013 at 2:10 AM · Report this

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