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My Daughter, Her Hair, and the Seattle School District

A Few Thoughts About My Daughter Getting Ejected from Her Class at Thurgood Marshall Elementary Last Week

My Daughter, Her Hair, and the Seattle School District

SICKENING The product that got my daughter kicked out of class.

Some people were all on my case about something I wrote for Slog, The Stranger's blog, concerning a Chinese girl found wandering the streets of Vancouver, BC, two weeks ago with a blond doll. I was thought cold for taking too much notice of the racial difference between the girl and her doll. But in my world, race is still a real and hard fact. It is not something that I have a theoretical or intellectual distance from. It is immediate. It is there all of the time.

For example, just last week, my daughter—who is 8 and happens to be the only brown person in her Accelerated Progress Program class at Thurgood Marshall Elementary—was ordered out of the classroom because her teacher did not like the smell of her hair. The teacher complained that my racially different daughter's hair (or something—a product—in the hair) was making her sick, and then the teacher made her leave the classroom. My daughter was aware of the racial nature of this expulsion not only because she was made to sit in a classroom that had more black students in it (the implication being that this is where she really belongs, in the lower class with the other black students), but because her teacher, she informed me, owns a dog. Meaning, a dog's hair gives the teacher less problems than my daughter's human but curly hair. Most white people do not have to deal with shit like this. Shit that if not checked and confronted will have permanent consequences for the child.

Over the weekend, KIRO-TV ran a story on its evening newscast about the situation. The news segment showed the hair product that my daughter used, Olive Oil Moisturizing Hair Lotion, and brief interviews with her mother and lawyer. The lawyer smelled the hair product and claimed it was harmless; her mother expressed distress about the whole situation. The story wrapped up with a reporter standing outside of my daughter's school in the Central District, explaining that he could not get a response from the teacher or the school's principal because the school was closed for the long weekend. That was all you learned from the KIRO story.

What was significantly missing from this report is that my daughter is black American (the only black student in that teacher's class) and the teacher who forced her out of the classroom is white American. The reason why this racial dimension was not exposed or addressed in the KIRO report is understandable: My daughter and her teacher were not interviewed. But my wife was interviewed—and she is white. So it follows that viewers would assume that her daughter is also white. But if the public had seen that the little girl has brown skin and curly hair, and her teacher has white skin and straight hair, then it would have been impossible to exclude race from this story.

If a white teacher—a person who is supposed to have a certain amount of education and knowledge of American history, and who teaches at a school named after the man who successfully argued before the court in Brown v. Board of Education for equal opportunities for racial minorities in public schools and went on to become the first African-American Supreme Court justice—removes a black student from a predominantly white class because of her hair, it is almost impossible not read the action as either racist or expressive of racial insensitivity, which amounts to the same thing for someone in that teacher's position.

When we, her parents, were later informed of this incident, we also learned that once my daughter was removed from the class, the teacher felt much better. We were also told that the teacher had experienced something like a fainting spell because of our daughter's hair. Feeling the seriousness of this situation, we decided not to send our daughter to school until the teacher had medical proof that our daughter's hair or something in her hair was to blame for the nausea. (The last thing you want to happen to your daughter is for a teacher to faint or vomit at the mere sight of her.)

Days passed and the school took no action. This unresponsiveness left us with no other choice than to turn to a lawyer. The whole thing is a mess. Getting entangled in a racial dilemma is something most black parents do not want for their children. It's just not worth the trouble. Then again, like I said, if not checked and confronted, the incident will have permanent consequences for my child.

So, yes, I have a very good reason to be sensitive to the image of a Chinese girl carrying a blond doll. Not to have that kind of sensitivity would in my case be a form of parental neglect.

Seattle Public Schools declined an interview request from Charles Mudede because he is the father of the student in question, but a school-district spokesperson agreed to be interviewed by The Stranger's news editor, Dominic Holden, just as this issue was going to press. Click here to read their response. recommended

 

Comments (375) RSS

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1
really? i think you are the only one turning it into a race thing.
you are teaching your daughter intolerance by making a huge deal out of this.
so what a chinese girl was carrying a blonde doll? it seems YOU are the only one that is making a racial issue of this.
maybe your the one with issues here. racism is racism no matter what color its coming from and you are definitly coming off as racist.

further more-
maybe the shampoo or conditioner that you use is actually making the teacher ill. some smells do that to people. im sure there is a smell that does that to you.(i know powdery smelling perfumes and popcorn for me. to some people that stuff smells great!) try changing your daughters shampoo/conditioner instead of throwing a tissy fit. you are the parent you should be more mature than this and should have handled it better.
Posted by wow just wow on June 2, 2010 at 11:22 AM · Report this
2
really you delete my comment because it isnt the same are your veiws? wow.

racism is racism no matter the color.
Posted by wow just wow on June 2, 2010 at 11:33 AM · Report this
3
Defending your daughter for a descpicable act from an authority figure is not racist.

Further more, you are assuming that the hair product was the actual cause of this ignorant teacher's prblems.

The school needs to address this issue and curtail it immediately!

the teacher- if you are reading this- karma is coming after you
Posted by averagejill on June 2, 2010 at 12:09 PM · Report this
4
Charles, I am 100% with you in regard to your outcry due to your daughter being expelled for her hair product. Many people (including myself) have sensitivity to perfumes or strong odors, but none of those hair care products fall into this category. My children have brown skin and curly hair too and I teach them not to accept this kind of crap from anyone. When there is injustice, we must fight for justice.
Posted by keeptawkin on June 2, 2010 at 12:13 PM · Report this
5
Even if the hair product in question was making the teacher feel sick, I have a hard time believing that there was no better way of dealing with the situation. Suck it up and deal with it. Then maybe contact the parents after class and ask if some changes can be made. But really, kicking a child out
of class for something like that is just unacceptable. Childhood is a shitty time for everybody and their self-esteem... It's the job of professional educators to ease the growth/development process, not to help instill insecurities that will haunt kiddos into adulthood. There be wrong doing afoot says I!
Posted by DoloresHaze on June 2, 2010 at 1:53 PM · Report this
6
Even if the teacher does have a sensitivity to perfumed products - which I do - one child in a classroom of children is NOT enough to produce that kind of reaction. And what does this teacher do outside the school? On the bus? In a movie theater? At a shopping mall? My son is a different racial mix than your daughter, but has a glorious head of curly, curly hair for which we use leave-in conditioner so he doesn't look like a blown-out dandelion. And if this is ever a problem at school, I plan to respond in the same manner as you and your wife. Kudos to you - your daughter will walk away from this head held high, knowing she is loved and her parents have her back.
Posted by StrangerFan on June 2, 2010 at 2:10 PM · Report this
7
In the same way that only Catholics experience Exorcist-style demon possession, it would also seem that only middle to upper middle class white people have M.C.S.

And yeah, Charles was right to lawyer up on this one (and I don't usually think Charles is right about much of anything).
Posted by Mr. X on June 2, 2010 at 2:57 PM · Report this
TVDinner 8
How ethical is it that Charles is reporting on an incident that involves him and his daughter? Especially now that a lawyer is involved?
Posted by TVDinner http:// on June 2, 2010 at 3:05 PM · Report this
JF 9
@3 We're not assuming shit. The teacher actually says the smell of the hair was a problem. There is no assumption about her reasoning on our behalf for excusing the child. Now I am assuming she's telling the truth. Individuals, such as yourself and the author are the ones who are not taking her statement at face value. You're the one assuming she's lying and you're the one assuming she's a racist. Just because some dude cries racism doesn't make it a fact.

And teacher - if you are reading this, I'd be really worried about that magic karma. It totally fucking exists. Jesus and his bro Muhammad mix batches of Karma up daily and give it Joseph Smith. He then peeks into his magic hat to determine which people on earth receive the good karma and which receive the bad.
Posted by JF on June 2, 2010 at 3:39 PM · Report this
TVDinner 10
You know, there are some key facts here we haven't been told. Was this the first time Mudede's daughter wore this product to school? If so, it seems entirely possible that if the teacher has chemical sensitivities she could have had a negative physical reaction to it. Mudede does not have a track record as being particularly empathetic to others (see his Slog posts on the child who killed himself after being bullied relentlessly in school), so I could see him dismissing the claim of being chemically sensitive out of hand.

This whole thing, as reported by Mudede, is outrageous and appalling. I'd really like to know the rest of the story, though, before rushing to judgment.
Posted by TVDinner http:// on June 2, 2010 at 4:15 PM · Report this
11
If something causes a problem remove something and see if the problem is gone. Your case; explain to your child that some people have sensitivities to smells that others do not. Make light of it, and change hair products. How f'n hard is that? If she gets kicked out again because her clothes are too bright, maybe lawyer up. Until then... chill out and quit sending your kid the wrong message.
Posted by don't be a hater on June 2, 2010 at 4:46 PM · Report this
12
The fact that a teacher would single out any child in that manner, regardless of race, in front of other students is troublesome to me. She is teacher, does she not realize kids notice these things, and turn it into more ammo in their verbal gun slinging (which being kids, they don't truly understand the cruelty and full affects of). Not to mention the embarrassment the poor girl must have felt initially, when asked to leave.
That said, I am very curious to know if this is the first time his daughter had worn the product to school. If it was the first time it's possible the smell did bother the teacher (although I'm not convinced an organic olive oil based product could have a very offensive smell, it's usually the more chemical perfumes and colognes that are the culprits). If that's the case she's still guilty of being very insensitive. She couldn't open a few windows, grin and bare it, then send a polite note discretely home w/the girl at the end of the day?
However, if this is something she wore everyday, that changes things. I know from personal experience the only time smells like perfumes etc. bother me (I dislike them all, but truly bother me, in ways the teacher described) is when I am HUNG THE FUCK OVER.....just a thought
Posted by Kyanite on June 2, 2010 at 4:52 PM · Report this
13
The fact that a teacher would single out any child in that manner, regardless of race, in front of other students is troublesome to me. She is teacher, does she not realize kids notice these things, and turn it into more ammo in their verbal gun slinging (which being kids, they don't truly understand the cruelty and full affects of). Not to mention the embarrassment the poor girl must have felt initially, when asked to leave.
That said, I am very curious to know if this is the first time his daughter had worn the product to school. If it was the first time it's possible the smell did bother the teacher (although I'm not convinced an organic olive oil based product could have a very offensive smell, it's usually the more chemical perfumes and colognes that are the culprits). If that's the case she's still guilty of being very insensitive. She couldn't open a few windows, grin and bare it, then send a polite note discretely home w/the girl at the end of the day?
However, if this is something she wore everyday, that changes things. I know from personal experience the only time smells like perfumes etc. bother me (I dislike them all, but truly bother me, in ways the teacher described) is when I am HUNG THE FUCK OVER.....just a thought
Posted by Kyanite on June 2, 2010 at 4:57 PM · Report this
14
The "teacher" (and I use that title loosely) sounds like an over-dramatic wench who has no business teaching the Future Adults of America. If she had such a marked problem, she should have excused herself from the classroom and gone to the nurse, and perhaps requested to be replaced with a substitute for the remainder of the day. If she found out that she still had issues, she should have called the parents to discuss a solution. Why should the kid have to deal with this crap as if she did something wrong? If the "teacher" truly had the issue she claims, she went about this in the wrong way. How about setting a good example on how to resolve issues? That kind of thing translates from the classroom to business settings. This "teacher" just taught a classroom of kids to be overdramatic wenches with no coping skills. Awesome.
Posted by Teachers in the family on June 2, 2010 at 5:08 PM · Report this
15
I feel terrible for this 8 year old girl and disgusted by her teacher's poor judgement. There is no way that a person with genuine fragrance sensitivity could be an elementary school teacher, there are way too many variables with kids. If a child were to smell bad it could mean they are being neglected at home and the teacher needs to treat it like a possible child abuse situation.
Posted by Antigone's Room on June 2, 2010 at 5:27 PM · Report this
16
Yeah, I kinda feel like the writer is the only one making a racial issue out of it.

Is the teacher a moron? Absolutely. Even if the scent of the hair product in question made her feel ill, that's no reason to make a child feel singled out.

It doesn't sound like cut-and-dry racism, though. Not even a little.

Can't people be total ass-hats in this town without also being *racist* ass-hats?
Posted by RW on June 2, 2010 at 5:53 PM · Report this
17
Um, I'm just going to throw some ideas into the mix, as a person who has taught in elementary, middle and high schools, and is myself extremely sensitive to smells.

1. Elementary students will pee, puke, and sometimes even poop on you. There will be kids who fart a lot. There will be kids who smell inexplicably like vinegar all the time.

2. For the average young adolescent, there is a solid fifteen months between the time one is supposed to begin wearing some form of deodorant and the time one actually begins wearing said deodorant -- or at least, wearing enough. It's like a stinky, stinky right of passage.

3. Freshmen boys love cologne. They think it's the greatest thing ever; thus, they bathe in it. From Axe body spray to designer fragrances, 15 year old boys are really really good at using too much. Perhaps it is overcompensation for the aforementioned period of hygienic neglect in middle school. Who can say, really. And the girls? Not much better.

My point is this: maybe it's not in the manual, and maybe no one mentions this during education certification, but as soon as you spend any time around kids, you find out that a component of teaching is ignoring any and all funky smells emanating from students, as long as said funky smells are not an impediment to the students themselves.

Of course, I can't imagine that a seasoned educator, who has no doubt experienced truly offensive odors in her classroom, would be undone by something as innocuous as an olive oil hair treatment. But, even if we give this teacher the benefit of the doubt, and take her at her word that she was genuinely bothered by the smell of this hair product, her actions make very little sense to me. You just don't tell an eight year old girl to leave class because the smell of her hair bothers you -- even if you are incredibly sensitive! even if you have morning sickness! -- you just don't do that. You suck it up, or you excuse /yourself/. You don't make the kid leave and go sit in someone else's class. Like, come on.

Okay, so that's just crummy teaching practice, you say, where's the racial component? Here's the thing: if you have the luxury of placing yourself in the "default" category on any number of fronts -- race, gender, etc (that such a "default" exists in the consciousness of our society is a huge part of the problem), you also tend to have the luxury of not considering how your own race, gender, etc plays into your perceptions and actions. In other words, most white people never think they're doing something because they're white; if you're white, it's easy to forget that you have any racial identity at all. And thus, it's easy to neglect and ignore the fact that other folks, for whom race is a positively defined element of their identity in the context of this society, are constantly having to go around resetting switches from "default."

This teacher, most likely, did not think to herself, "Huh -- hair (texture, style, treatment) is an incredibly racially charged subject. I know what I'll do! I'll single out my only black student by making an issue of her hair! That'll be awesome!" I mean, it's possible her motivations were that /overtly/ racist; again, let's give her the benefit of the doubt and imagine they were not. There's still a big problem.

It's unlikely this teacher was thinking about the significance and connotations of hair -- and that's because for her, as a member of the "default" racial group, hair doesn't have significance and connotation. She has the luxury of having "default" hair; she has the luxury of never feeling singled out or racially defined by her hair. Does this mean she's off the hook, because she didn't know or because it didn't occur to her? Can the racial connotations of a white teacher singling out a student of color by making an issue of her hair be dismissed? Absolutely not. White people plead ignorance all the time for things like this: "I wasn't being racist when I said/did that -- I just didn't know any better. I didn't know that was offensive." Well, I think that's pretty weak (I'm white; I kind of think it's my own damn responsibility to be as conscious of the role race plays in our society as everyone else, who is being fucked over by it, is). Race is an issue in this story the way it is more and more frequently in America -- not because of an overt act of aggression, but because of a passive act of inconsideration.

Which, to my mind, is just as egregious. The posture of "default" -- of having the privilege to not have to consider your privilege, may not be a posture anyone is actively choosing to take. That doesn't make it acceptable. Folks who enjoy privilege are not exempt from examining it. Folks who don't have to consciously experience racism aren't entitled to plead ignorance that such a thing exists.
More...
Posted by Catastrophic Success on June 2, 2010 at 8:43 PM · Report this
18
What grade does this teacher teach? How long has she been at Thurgood Marshall? Any chance this is not the first time she has done something like this? I ask because of an issue involving my mixed ethnicity nephew a couple years ago and another involving an African American neighbor shortly after.
Posted by zzz2 on June 2, 2010 at 11:58 PM · Report this
19
What grade does this teacher teach? How long has she been at Thurgood Marshall? Any chance this is not the first time she has done something like this? I ask because of an issue involving my mixed ethnicity nephew a couple years ago and another involving an African American neighbor shortly after.
Posted by zzzxz on June 3, 2010 at 12:01 AM · Report this
gebbeth 20
We should ignore the point of this story and instead focus on racial difference between Mudede and his wife. I think it’s only fair. They found the Asian girls mother by the way.
Posted by gebbeth on June 3, 2010 at 12:38 AM · Report this
21
i am a 'brown' person who has worn that very same product and i gotta tell u - it makes me a bit nauseated if i use too much...i had to switch to a vit e oil that had less of a smell. it's a very personal thing because i had my mom smell it and she said it was fine.
my point is smells and the effect of said smells are very individualised. that being said - the teacher did behave very unprofessionally and could have handled the situation in a very different way. i need more info to determine whether this was indeed racially motivated, but there does seem to be a whiff of racism as evidenced by the fact that the teacher chose such an extreme response when there were so many other options available to her..
Posted by nastyrose on June 3, 2010 at 7:14 AM · Report this
22
I wanted to address readers' beliefs that the author was being one sided, uncaring, or jumping to conclusions - pulling out the r-card that scares all white people- for believing the issue of his daughter being removed from class had racial overtones. I think in the NW, we have reached a comfortable status quo that allows white people to come extremely comfortable and complacent with the belief that "racism" is an action that only entails overt name calling or discrimination, and even worse, that it exists only in rare form in our modern world. I have found that -while at least outwardly kind and polite- white people in the northwest are all together dismissive and ignorant to the subtler forms of racism, or like he says in the article, racial sensitivity. I whole heartedly believe that the teacher did NOT consciously think "lets send this mixed girl outta the classroom into the lower class with her people where she belongs" However, it is ENTIRELY appropriate for someone to challenge her on the underlying reasons and problems with what she did, and she owes it to her classroom community to be honest and reflective situation. So the product was making her sick, did she handle it the same way she would have if a white student had brought in a product with a strong scent as well? If so, then fine, she also probably deserves the space to be able to honestly and with proper reflection say that this removal from class did not have racial undertones. However, this conversation needs to happen. A lot more. Why are there more non-white students in the lower performing classrooms. Why is the ISS classroom rarely a vanilla mix? In a mixed school, why are white childrens grades statistically higher? Teachers, administration, and parents need to start pushing for answers. It will be an uncomfortable and difficult conversation and practice but fuck, at least its honest.
More...
Posted by seattlela on June 3, 2010 at 8:27 AM · Report this
23
For reasons too obvious to state, Charles has no business writing about this here. Even for the Stranger, a new low.
Posted by Billy Chav on June 3, 2010 at 8:46 AM · Report this
24
Really, twice in the article you have to mention your daughter is the only black girl in the class. What would you do if you had to write about something that couldn't claim was race based you useless hack?
Posted by Up Yours Mudede on June 3, 2010 at 8:48 AM · Report this
25
Sounds to me that Medude is making this a racist thing. I don't like strong perfumes either. This seems out of place in the Stranger, don't you think? Simmer down, Charles, it's not always about race, even though you seem to always make it that seem that way.
Posted by Blinky on June 3, 2010 at 11:47 AM · Report this
26
In the 2nd paragraph you state that "My daughter... was made to sit in a classroom that had more black students in it... in the lower class with the other black students" but then in the 4th paragraph you say, "my daughter is the only black student in that teacher's class." Well, which is it?
Posted by meso on June 3, 2010 at 11:56 AM · Report this
27
Perhaps the teacher did not handle the situation well, but the daughter in the classroom was doing well and had friends. Charles yanked his daughter out of the classroom and is suing the District and teacher. What's this going to mean for his daughter's education and her friendships. Doesn't seem like he cares about his daughter or the class -- just the chip on his shoulder.

Charles is playing the race card unfairly and is making his daughter and a well meaning teacher pay unfairly. Surely, there is a better way to deal with this. The teacher in question is quirky and frail. Perhaps Charles has some prejudices of his own.

Also, the teacher had passed out in the hallway the day before and rushed to the hospital. There was serious concern that she had anaphalactic shock and may have died. Probably wasn't the hair solution, but, in this sort of situation, why not just have your daughter switch conditioners? Why sue?

Thurgood Marshall doesn't have many students of African American descent, but neither does the Stranger staff.

Posted by Jennie on June 3, 2010 at 12:56 PM · Report this
28
This is SUCH a bad idea to publish this article post-attorney. The racism gets thrown in the ring pretty quickly by Mudede, who seems to forget from time to time that his wife is white. Perhaps the poor little Chinese girl was adopted, or had an Anglo mom or dad. Maybe Mudede shouldn't refer to the majority-black class as "lower". Maybe inflammatory statements published in a newspaper won't affect the schools response. Maybe humans should get over themselves. But I doubt it.
Posted by squabmeat on June 3, 2010 at 1:24 PM · Report this
Josh Bomb 29
I just now realized this took place at, of all places, Thurgood Marshall Elementary!!

The irony, it burns!
Posted by Josh Bomb http://www.satanosphere.com on June 3, 2010 at 1:42 PM · Report this
30
It's really not appropriate for Charles to use his media pulpit/employer as a tool in this private dispute. If the Stranger has to report on this it needs to assign a reporter who is not a member of the Mudede family.

This sounds like the kind of thing that could be resolved with a level-headed conversation but will most likely end up in court because hey, this is America.
Posted by codswallower on June 3, 2010 at 3:38 PM · Report this
31
Our child was in that class. The teacher has some kind of allergy condition that was aggravated by construction work at her home, making her hyper-sensitive to certain smells, including fragrances such as found in some perfumes, hair products, etc. -- is what parents were told at the time. A special request was emailed to all the parents asking them to help out by not sending their child in to school the next day with any fragrance. Evidently all the parents got the message and complied except this one. Our child said when this girl came to school with the fragrance in her hair and it caused severe problems for the teacher, and the child was asked to sit in a neighboring classroom for at least part of the schoolday. (This is sometimes done at this school when there are disciplinary issues). I was shocked when my child reported that the next day the girl AGAIN came to school with the fragrance. This time she was put into a different class for the whole day, is my understanding. I did a simple search for the hair product used. Here are the ingredients:

Ingredients
Aqua (Water) , Cocos Nucifera Oil (Coconut) , Sorbitol , Petrolatum , Cyclopentasiloxane , Carthamus Tinctorius Seed Oil (Safflower) , Ricinus Communis Seed Oil (Castor) , Cetyl Esters , Cetearyl Alcohol , Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate , Stearic Acid , Olea Europaea Fruit Oil (Olive) , PPG-3 Benzyl Ether Myristate , Dimethicone , Glyceryl Glycol , Triethanolamine , Carbomer , Disodium EDTA , BHT , FRAGRANCE , Benzyl Alcohol , Benzyl Salicylate , Geraniol , Hexyl Cinnamal , Lilial , D-Limonene , Linalool , Lyral Methyl Ionone , CI 42090 (Blue #1) , CI 19140 (Yellow #5).

I strongly oppose racial discrimination, and I know it is alive today. But not always.
Sometimes a person can make a fool of themselves claiming discrimination when there is none. Here is the irony: since the '70's blacks and Latinos have been falling behind on test scores, more crime, etc. The District is trying to "close the gap" and encourage such students to enter into the highly gifted APP program. Is this girls parents doing anyone a service by effectively removing her from such a wonderful and empowering program? In psychology some people want to play the martyr or victim in life; it is a comfortable role. But overusing this role actually holds them and their cause back. Some blacks have begun to realize this. Bill Cosby received a lot of flack when he started asking black men to stop playing the victim and step up and be role models. Oprah had a program on this. The Seattle School District's Superintendant Goodloe-Johnson (sp) (who is also black) even says black people can hold themselves back by doing this. Sorry Charles, sometimes the proverbial cigar is just a cigar. Is it necessary that you know my race to judge this comment? Isn't that discriminatory? I wish you the best. Your daughter deserves it.
More...
Posted by machew on June 3, 2010 at 9:51 PM · Report this
32
Sure is nice to be able to buy ink by the barrel.

Regardless, I think you are right here, Charles.

May the 'Teacher' find herself in a 'Groundhog Day' version of the 'Twilight Zone'. Mind them Chopper Blades, Teach!

Posted by 2embarassed2byTP on June 3, 2010 at 10:45 PM · Report this
33
And then, up pops machew...

Kinda weakens the argument...

Gotta a Comment, Charles?

I'm thinkin you Owe Us one here, Mr. Ink By The Barrel...

Or do I owe Teach an Apology? (Jeez -- They haven't started filming, have they?!! Hope I ain't Too Late!)
Posted by 2embarassed2byTP on June 3, 2010 at 10:53 PM · Report this
34
mr. mudede,
as a fellow third-world person living legally in the united states with all its beautiful laws and flaws,
i have to say i would love to see you sue those fuckers.
what they have done to you and your family has no name- they have no shame.

in a just society i believe a jury would find it to be criminally racist.

this teacher is not fit for duty. of all the reasons to send a child home-

this was not one of them

let us all protest!

this country really is getting more racist by the day-
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 12:07 AM · Report this
35
way to jump to huge racist conclusions Mudede! machew's comment brings up not only a different perspective, but hell, a more believable one....i mean come on, seriously? i absolutely do not see racism in this situation at all. an article like this really cheapens the Stranger's credibility....
Posted by pistolkitten on June 4, 2010 at 12:24 AM · Report this
Charles Mudede 36
@35, i wish i could say more.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 4:57 AM · Report this
Charles Mudede 37
@33, trust me, my daughter does not put that frangrance in her hair everyday. and, more importantly, information about the product was sent to the school with no response.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 5:06 AM · Report this
38
My child is also in this classroom and from my understanding, machew summarized the situation well. Given the teacher's chemical sensitivity and the construction at her home, I believe the teacher's reaction was due entirely to the specific set of circumstances. That being said, it's very disappointing that this was not handled more thoughtfully and considerately by everyone.

One thing I do not understand, Charles, is why, if the teacher cannot handle the smell, was your daughter sent to the ALO classroom and not to the other APP classroom? (This is what you imply in the second paragraph.) And why is that not a solution for the rest of the year?
Posted by Tosca on June 4, 2010 at 6:58 AM · Report this
39
Water - Aqua, Coconut Oil - Cocos Nucifera, Sorbitol, Trimonium Methosulfate, Cetearyl Alcohol , Petrolatum, Cyclomethicone, Peanut Oil - Arachi Hypogaea , Castor Oil - Ricinus Communis, Cetyl Esters, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil - Olea Europaea, Stearic Acid, Triethanolamine, DMDM Hydantoin, Propylene Glycol, Methyl Paraben, Propyl Paraben, Carbomer , Cetearyl Alcohol , Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate, PEG-25 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Fragrance - Parfum , Benzyl Alcohol , Benzyl Salicylate , Geraniol, Hexylcinnamicaldehyde, Lillial, D'Limonene, Linalool, Lyral, Alpha Isomethyl Ionone, BHT , Blue No. 1 - CI 42090, Yellow No. 5 - CI 19140

You put that on your daughter's head? Don't you realize how much is absorbed into the body from the scalp>

Parabens cause cancer ( and have been removed from many beauty products).

Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate- is an irritant and causes organ damage in animal studies.

Petroleum- is what BP sells- that shouldn't be used either.

Triethanolamine- causes cancer ( creates nitrosamines)

Propylene Glycol- you know what antifreeze is don't you?

Hexylcinnamicaldehyde- is a class B allergen.

Arachi Hypogaea- Peanut oil.

Geraniol- is often used as insect repellent- as the scent apparently deters bugs.

Lillial- used for scent.

D'Limonene- used for scent

Lyral- used for scent- or as we in the beauty industry call it- "Hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde, the most allergic fragrance chemical currently used".

Alpha Isomethyl Ionone- so strong an allergen the IFA ( International Fragrance Association) banned its use.

Regardless of the way the school district managed this issue- and I hope it has been resolved- ORGANIC printed on a label does not mean NON-TOXIC.
Do your daughter a favor and get some olive oil that has been approved to put into your body.

I would also suggest that while this instance is unfortunate- it is little in comparison to the way the school district has handled rapes of challenged students at Rainier Beach and Roosevelt. ( amongst others)

Education reporting is a joke in this community- news is transmitted by blogs to staff and parents like

More...
Posted by emeraldkity on June 4, 2010 at 7:31 AM · Report this
40
ack- my edit didn't take-
Please add.

Education reporting in daily papers is a joke in this community- accurate news is transmitted by blogs to staff and parents like saveseattleschools.blogspot.com. The community needs an education reporter- & your voice would be welcomed ( As a Stranger columnist- you would be mainstream!)

For instance just the fact that your daughter is the only non-white student in her class is against the reasoning that was used to split APP. What efforts are being used to address this issue? Are we going to have a district of schools that aren't only split by race geographically, but even inside the buildings?
Posted by emeraldkity on June 4, 2010 at 7:36 AM · Report this
41
Yeah, but, #37 ('@'33? Is that short for 'Posting at #33 ?), were you not aware of Teach's fragrance sensitiivity? Or merely immune to her request?

So your beautiful daughter may not wear it 'daily' -- why wear it at all (assuming there may be a fragrance-free alternative)?

I do agree, Teach's actions were most objectionable. I have no problem with her offensive reaction being actionable as well; is there not some culpability on both sides? Is there a way to get to 'I'm okay, you're okay"?

Or do we have a 'Mexican Standoff' here?

(Thank God for the Lawyers, eh?)

Thank you for your response(s).
Posted by 2embarassed2byTP on June 4, 2010 at 7:38 AM · Report this
Charles Mudede 42
@38, im very happy to learn that all the other students washed their clothes with just cold water, and used no (or perfectly scentless) products (soap and all) whatsoever to clean themselves. only my daughter, the only black student in the class, had the fucking nerve to use a product that caused the teacher to fear for her life! my daughter smelled and all other students in the class were found by this teacher (using her nose on each student) to have used nothing but cold water for all of their cleaning purposes. they did not smell at all! this is what you and @31 are telling me? 28 other kids did not have "the least fragrance" on them.

really, this is what you are saying! really, no other student is using lip gloss or some other thing like that!

so if i had used just cold water on my daughter and her things, like the other white students evidently did, none of this would have happened. im simply amazed!

by the way, this is a product she has been using all year.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 7:40 AM · Report this
43
Mr. Mudede, could you please answer some straight-forward questions that are raised by the information that was provided by a reader?

Did the teacher advise the students' families - including yours - of a recent and temporary sensitivity to fragrances? Yes or no.

Can you explain why, when asked courteously and respectfully - along with every other family with a student in the class - not to apply fragrances to your child did you neglect or reject that request? Were you unaware of it? Did you regard your child's right to fragrance greater than the teacher's right to her well-being?

Can you explain why, after your child spent part of one school day in a neighboring class due to the hair treatment, your child came to school the next day with the treatment on her hair? Were you unaware of the events of the previous day?

Since having your daughter spend the day in the other class is clearly unacceptable to you, what solution would you propose?

If the harm you claim is that your child was deprived of a seat in the class, then how is your solution - to keep her home from school - a positive?

On what grounds do you base your doubt that the fragrance caused the teacher distress? Why should you question that? Do you question the discomfort people felt in the South Shore school building? How do you decide which health complaints to question and which to accept without question?

The question is not, as you have tried to position it, whether the other children in the class were scent-free. It doesn't matter if none of the other children had any fragrance or not. What matters is that they didn't have a fragrance in concentrations that sickened the teacher. Perhaps some of them did create problems for her. Perhaps their families showed the courtesy to prevent their children from returning to the classroom with a fragrance product that made the teacher unwell. The real question is, why, after the scent on your child was a known problem, you chose to create a confrontation instead of just forgoing the hair treatment.

Likewise, your reference to your daughter's use of the product all year has no bearing. As was explained, the sensitivity was recent. Were you not aware of that or are you simply ignoring the fact as inconvenient?

Why get all confrontational over a hair treatment? Why presume ill intent? Why presume racism - has the teacher been racist all year?
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 8:10 AM · Report this
44
I don't see anything that says the sensitivity was recent. If it's the teacher I think it is, it's a very longstanding condition. I have a 2007 email from her about it.
Posted by janedeau on June 4, 2010 at 8:39 AM · Report this
Charles Mudede 45
@43, you speak as if there is no cultural component in the matter of smells. it appears to me that you believe there to be one, universal standard to smells that all must comply with--no matter what background or cultural history. what is so striking in all of this, and this struck me at the very beginning of this mess, is the support for this teacher's sensitive to smells is matched by a complete indifference to cultural sensitivity.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 9:25 AM · Report this
gebbeth 46
"by the way, this is a product she has been using all year."
I assume your daughter has also been black all year. Its now June, most schools are going to break for summer soon, so I would imagine your daughter has been in this class for 8 months now. There are two sides to this coin.
Posted by gebbeth on June 4, 2010 at 9:35 AM · Report this
47
Mr. Mudede, I don't deny a cultural component to smells. Nowhere in my comment do I make any such suggestion. Nor do I suggest that there to be any one universal standard for smells, nor do I suggest that everyone comply to any such standard. Please do me the kindness of not putting words into my mouth.

You seem to have a lot of trouble addressing yourself to the actual questions of fact rather than your conjecture about the motivations of others.

I believe there is a physiological component to sickness; how about you?

I believe there is a cultural component to the extent to which we believe that we should moderate our comestic choices to accomodate the health needs of those with whom we share space. What does your culture tell you about that? Does it tell you to insist upon the right of individuals to persist in easily modified behavior - however innocent - that harms others?

When you're done building and knocking down straw men, will you please address yourself to the questions:

Did you receive the teacher's request to reduce fragrances in the classroom?

Were you aware that there was a problem with the effect that your daughter's hair treatment had on the teacher on one day? Were you aware that she spent part of that day in another classroom?

Did you, with the knowledge that chemicals in your daughter hair had a negative impact on her teacher the previous day, send her to school the following day with the hair treatment?

Do you believe that your daughter's right to use the hair treatment of her choice outweighs her teacher's right to a healthful workplace? Is there some deeper reason that your family could not make this accomodation for the teacher's well-being? Is there a principle at stake here regarding free choice in hair treatments?

Given that the chemicals in the hair treatment cause illness in the teacher, what solution do you propose? The choices appear to be to assign the teacher to another class - which would be disruptive to everyone in the class - assign your daughter to another class - which would be disruptive for your daughter - or simply stop using the hair treatment. Which of these choices do you prefer?

Or do you persist in doubting whether the chemicals in the hair treatment are the source of the teacher's distress? If so, what is the basis for that doubt?
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 10:01 AM · Report this
48
For my part, I think you are spot on about cultural sensitivity. I have no problem with that at all. I'm just providing more information about the teacher's long-term issue to show that she didn't just pull it out of a hat.

But yeah, I agree with the teacher's handling of the situation being not only misguided in general (based on the testimony I've heard), but insensitive to the racial context.
Posted by janedeau on June 4, 2010 at 10:35 AM · Report this
Charles Mudede 49
@47, again, this product was used all year. all year. all year. ok. no letter from a doctor to me about this matter at all. no nurse, no doctor, no principle. my wife recieved a letter not even from the teacher, but a parent in the class about how the teacher is sensitive to smells in general. now, remember, the product has been used all year--no fainting, no nausea, no letters from a doctor, nurse, or principle during the whole year. please get this into your head: all year! suddenly, suddenly my daughter is killing the teacher with something she has used All Year Long.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 10:50 AM · Report this
50
I understand your point, Mr. Mudede. I am not saying the teacher was in the right or that her explanation makes entire sense. All I meant was that there is evidence she did not make up this condition specifically for this situation.

The commenter at 22 suggests that if the teacher would have done the same thing with a white child, then she didn't do anything racist. I don't think that's a good test. Taking away the context of "white person telling black person she smells" and "white person telling black person she used the wrong hair product", it's a totally different interaction.
Posted by janedeau on June 4, 2010 at 11:11 AM · Report this
51
Yes, Mr. Mudede, something changed. As another parent of a child in the class has stated,

"The teacher has some kind of allergy condition that was aggravated by construction work at her home, making her hyper-sensitive to certain smells, including fragrances such as found in some perfumes, hair products, etc. -- is what parents were told at the time."

So although your daughter used the product all year, all year, all year, the teacher's sensitivity was new, new, new. Please get this into your head: new.

Second, your family DID receive a letter - thank you for acknowledging that - about the teacher's sensitivity, yet you chose to place a higher value on your daughter's choice of cosmetics. Even after you were aware that the teacher had a negative reaction to the hair treatment you sent your daughter to school with the hair treatment again. From another member of the school community: "Also, the teacher had passed out in the hallway the day before and rushed to the hospital." But your daughter's right to use that specific hair treatment is a greater value. That's pretty callous, isn't it? Are you showing the same sensitivity that you demand in others?

Third, where do you get off demanding a letter to you from a doctor or a nurse? Why can't you offer the teacher the simple courtesy of not sending your daughter into her classroom with chemicals that cause her to vomit and faint? Is that so much to ask without some force of law behind it? No one owes you a letter from a doctor. You have not right to a letter from a doctor. And what would you know if you had a letter from a doctor that you don't know now?

Are we to understand that if there were a letter from a doctor then you would not regard the teacher as a racist or even culturally insensitive?

As machew wrote:
"A special request was emailed to all the parents asking them to help out by not sending their child in to school the next day with any fragrance. Evidently all the parents got the message and complied except this one. Our child said when this girl came to school with the fragrance in her hair and it caused severe problems for the teacher, and the child was asked to sit in a neighboring classroom for at least part of the schoolday... I was shocked when my child reported that the next day the girl AGAIN came to school with the fragrance."

What's the higher value in your culture - your choice of cosmetics or another person's health?
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 11:47 AM · Report this
52
I'm a little disappointed in Mr. Mudede. When APP was in the throes of the split in the Fall of '08, I had hoped that he might use his platform to discuss the pros and cons of the split - coming from his unique perspective. Whether pro or con, I would have been interested in what he had to say; it would have either refuted the assertions of a vocal minority who favored the split or supported those who wished to keep the cohort intact for reasons not motivated by racism/classism.

How unfortunate that his only public discussion of the program that his child participates in has to do with this hair product allergy and perceived racism. It just smacks of one more jab at the "racist" APP program.

We don't know if the teacher/student/parents had a history of negative interactions prior to this, if the teacher had asked the student to stop wearing the product prior to the incident (some accounts suggest this), or if there was an APP classroom she could have been moved to instead of a Gen. Ed. class (some have said there is another APP class at the same grade), if the teacher has called attention to her allergies/chemical sensitivities or asked other students to stop using a product or leave the classroom. I'm all for rooting out racism where it exists, but I'm not ready to crucify this teacher without more info.

It sounds like the whole thing could have been better handled by all parties involved.
Posted by Swanky Modes on June 4, 2010 at 11:49 AM · Report this
53
"So although your daughter used the product all year, all year, all year, the teacher's sensitivity was new, new, new. Please get this into your head: new."

Did the letter say that the sensitivity is new, or that the construction was recent? Did recent construction make a long-term problem worse? I don't think we know.
Posted by janedeau on June 4, 2010 at 12:01 PM · Report this
54
Mr. Mudede says that the teacher's senisitivity was new - not that it makes any difference at all if the reaction were old, or new, or old but newly worse. That's an issue for Mr. Mudede, but it doesn't matter to the larger question. The larger question is whether, once his family is made aware of the problem - that the teacher is made physically ill by the chemicals in a cosmetic his daughter wears - whether he should insist on his daughter's right to wear the cosmetic or whether he and his family should offer a little courtesy and forego the cosmetic.

It doesn't matter if the sensitivity were old or new. It doesn't matter is the child wore the product all year. Once a problem is identified why can't he and his family simply accomodate the teacher's allergy? Why does he have to lawyer up? Why would he rather remove his daughter from the classroom than remove the spray from her hair?

Mr. Mudede has not addressed the real issues of this situation as he invents more distractions.

Did his family get a letter advising them of the teacher's sensitivity? Yes they did.

Were they aware that their daughter's hair treatment caused the teacher physical distress? He hasn't answered, but it appears that they did.

Did they choose to continue to use the product after they knew that it caused the teacher physical distress? He hasn't answered, but it appears that they did.

So what solution does Mr. Mudede and his family want? Remove the teacher from the class, remove the student from the class, or remove the hair treatment from the class? He hasn't answered, but it appears that he wants his daughter removed from the class because that is the action he took.

If he and his family have behaved with any sort of consideration or courtesy, they would have just stopped using the hair treatment and this would not have become an issue. Mr. Mudede and his family appear to be seeking a needless confrontation.
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 12:40 PM · Report this
Charles Mudede 55
@ 51, please, i refer you to the cultural component i discussed earlier. it answers a point you seem to miss deliberately.

you have no idea the kind of climate of humiliation this situation created for my daughter, who was the subject of a witchhunt.

so fuck you and others who think this is really about chemicals and not culture.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 12:44 PM · Report this
56
Well, we have another person saying the hair product causes mild nausia. Also, my understanding is that the other teacher offered to take the student and that it wasn't as abrupt as implied.
I'm all for making plain the invisible racism of the "default population," but I think sometimes the race card might be a little too convenient, too.
My hunch is the teacher was probably being overly dramatic and the author repaid in like kind. If he wanted to simply address the idea of invisible racism, fine, but unless the author has other examples of racism by the teacher to infer from, I think I've just read one big straw-man...and considering he just essentially made the assertion they have a racist for a teacher, I think it's a little dickish.
I sincerely hope her teacher isn't a closet racist who suddenly found an excuse to exercise her bigotry, and I'm sure being sent from the room for the way you smell (assuming the reason was made explicit to the children, of course) is an embarrassing situation. I think it's clear from this response alone that it was not the best option, but not knowing all the facts (as we clearly do not), I think the real issue has to do with how to address students who, hypothetically of course, unexpectedly introduce potential allergens to a classroom.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 4, 2010 at 12:49 PM · Report this
57
Moreover, I really don't understand a value system that puts one person's right to choose a specific cosmetic above another person's health.

Your rights are not a bludgeon for you to use to beat others.
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 12:52 PM · Report this
58
Ah, fuck me. Nice. You've done an excellent job of making your perspective clear, Mr. Mudede.

Good luck in Court.

By the way, this is the first that you have written about a witchhunt or humiliation. You keep finding new issues when your old issues are proven feeble.

So now the problem isn't that the teacher's reaction was new or that you doubt the legitimacy of the teacher's allergic reaction but that your daughter was humiliated by having to sit in a classroom predominantly populated by brown-skinned children. That's humiliating for her, is it?

Apparently there was also a witchhunt. Please tell us more about that as it is now the main issue but we're only just now reading about it.

Again, once you knew that the hair treatment triggered an allergic reaction in the teacher but you continued to use it because... of a cultural imperative?
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 1:02 PM · Report this
59
interesting that the commentary to an article on kiro's website http://www.kirotv.com/news/23743530/deta…
which deals with this issue-
brings a lot more calls for the teacher to be fired
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 1:07 PM · Report this
Charles Mudede 60
i really should shut up about this but what you see as a retreat to other arguments is in fact an enlargement of what i understand about this situation. i can, actually, enlarge the picture even more, and it only gets worse.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 4, 2010 at 1:23 PM · Report this
61
If you know more, then tell us, fer cryin' out loud! If you don't or can't, then shut up about it already. Otherwise it's just you asserting that you are right because you have facts that you won't tell us.

I know something you don't nyah-nyah-nyah.
Posted by Swanky Modes on June 4, 2010 at 2:04 PM · Report this
Leppardfreakgirl 62
I have worked in many school districts and we are specifically told not to wear perfume. A work environment isn't a place to smell "romantic" and the one time I broke that rule, the teacher in the class room started sneezing loudly and announced the smell was coming from me. I learned my lesson. I am assuming the hair product was scented. The question is, should the students follow the same rules as us teachers? I don't know.
Posted by Leppardfreakgirl on June 4, 2010 at 2:19 PM · Report this
63
Please don't extend yourself, Mr. Mudede. Once you've made the "fuck you" argument I don't see any need for you to explain yourself further.

It's all very clear now. Your daughter's hair treatment causes an allergic reaction in her teacher, and you're response is "fuck the teacher". Your daughter's right to put whatever she wants on her head clearly outweighs the health impacts it has on those around her. You certainly don't owe her teacher any courtesy or respect. That's perfectly clear. There's no need for you write anything more about that.

The hair product in question is a part of your culture, so the teacher's allergic reaction to the chemicals in it are a textbook example of cultural insensitivity. Anyone who thinks this is about chemicals instead of culture is being deliberately obtuse. It's abundantly clear. There are no chemicals here. There is no such thing as real sensitivity to chemicals. It's all in the teacher's head and it is a manifestation of her racism. No need for you to expand on that line of reasoning.

Unless of course a doctor sends you a letter attesting to the teacher's actual allergic reaction to the chemicals in the hair treatment. In that case there's a whole other set of evidence that the teacher is a racist. We see your perspective pefectly. You have nothing more to explain.

If you are tempted to enlarge the discussion, I would only ask if you would enlarge it to answer the one thing that I'm not getting:

After you knew that the hair treatment was causing the teacher physical distress, why did you insist on continuing to use it?

Was it because you thought she was faking so you didn't care about her distress?

Was it because you thought the physical reaction to the chemicals in the hair product were actually a manifestation of her distaste for your daughter's culture and therefore she deserved to be punished with it?

Was it because the hair treatment is an expression of cultural pride and therefore continuing to use it is a matter of principle regardless of the negative impacts on others?

Was it because the teacher didn't ask you nicely enough not to use the hair treatment and you chose to punish the teacher for her lack of courtesy?

Why did you send your daughter to school with the hair treatment after you knew that it caused her teacher to become ill?
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 4, 2010 at 2:28 PM · Report this
freebird84 64
The fact that there are posts defending the actions of the teacher in this scenario, to me, represents the subtle and invisible nature of racism and discrimination. At least, to those who do not have to deal with these realities on a daily basis. In this way, these posters provide support for the author's point that members of non-White groups in society have to deal with the realities of racism as "a real and hard fact" that is "immediate...and there all of the time."
Posted by freebird84 on June 4, 2010 at 3:42 PM · Report this
65
This is so sad and unnecessary. Mr. Mudede has a very large chip on his shoulder, likely from exposure to real racial and cultural discrimination. That, however, does not excuse him from the fabrications he has created around this incident. The class is not all white, the teacher has serious health issues, the hair was not the issue the product in it was, students were notified not to wear perfumes, cosmetics or hair treatments, etc., etc. His comic McCarthyism "I have more information and it is worse", his derisive and vulgar dismissal of doubters, his hiring a lawyer and then unetically use of the pages of the Starnger to make his non-existent case are so unfair; to his daughter, her classmates, the teacher and the school.

Whatever Mudede's personal demons are they seem to have transformed him into a bully! So sad.
Posted by parent on June 4, 2010 at 3:49 PM · Report this
66
There's definitely racism out there, and the teacher could have handled this much, much better. But we don't really know her true motivation, and based on her long history of being super-sensitive to fragrances and her plea for help as her condition was recently pushed to the edge with construction work at her home (see #31 above), I'm guessing that her brash removal of the girl from class was not driven by race, ethnicity or culture -- though ultimately it's hard to exclude this entirely -- but rather because of the fragrance. (Our son, who is in the class, is 'half-brown' by the way).

So clumsy handling by the teacher. But let's look again at Mr. Mudede. By sending his daughter back that second day with the same problematic hair product, maybe he got just what he was after: a big hot-button story. After all, he has an ongoing piece on the Stranger, doesn't he? This is not about race at all: it's about the age-old competing interests of parent and child. We need to accel in life ourselves, but hopefully not to the disadvantage of our offspring. I hope this girl will be back in APP next year. In general Mr. Mudede is probably a good person, and sheds well-needed light on issues of racism that are present everyday, though he seems to have missed the mark on this one.
Posted by machew on June 4, 2010 at 5:20 PM · Report this
67
Charles Mudede - new race hustler. But not as good and rich as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton. No, FUCK YOU.
Posted by Sennapod on June 4, 2010 at 5:48 PM · Report this
68
Coming from the other side of this, I work in schools. I am chemically sensitive. There are rooms in my building that will make me ill to go into, I leave with migraines if I am there for more than a very few minutes. I have a health plan on file with the district related to scent and other migraine/nausea triggers. However, I do tell students on day one that perfumes and other scents can make me ill. I have posters around my room about it. These concerns can be very real for some people, even if they aren't a problem for other people, or other people can't readily detect the issue (the room that makes me sick has at best a 'faint odor' to other people, I can't get more than 10 feet from the doorway without my eyes watering and being able to smell it).
However, the way the teacher excluded this student was improper. I do have students with odor issues of all kinds, and I deal with them directly. Granted, my students are older, but it can still be done with respect. If it's a short term odor issue (someone got sprayed with AXE in the hall) I position myself away from them and open windows. If it's longer term or something I know the student to have done voluntarily, I gently take them aside and explain the product is problematic for me, and let them know I can't be near them if they continue to use it (they will sit far from where I generally place myself in the room). From there it can usually be problem solved as far as finding a suitable replacement products, or proper application that won't make me ill.
But none of this comes as a surprise to the students, as they see the posters daily, and it was made very, very clear at the beginning of the year. I have never had to exclude a student from class for scent issues, nor have I met resistance to my request.
I agree that the teacher was not responding appropriately to the situation, but I do not agree that it was an intrinsically racist move. The lack of movement on the part of the school after the incident is also not acceptable. However, the request for a medical statement is a bit overkill as well. It takes time and money, even with insurance, to obtain a statement, and if this reaction came as a shock to the teacher, the isolated nature of the incident makes it that much more difficult to obtain one, even if the reaction were genuine. If the teacher is truly racist, it should have manifested itself prior to this, or if the product in question were to change, something else should come up. To call this isolated incident racist is either not the whole story, or deeply ignorant of the reality of chemical sensitivity.
More...
Posted by chemically sensitive on June 4, 2010 at 5:58 PM · Report this
69
Was she permanently set in a lower class?
Posted by rabbit on June 4, 2010 at 6:32 PM · Report this
70
here is one for all the WASPS that just don't get it:

you would not last even 5 minutes outside your tiny bubble.

and by that, i mean the world

oh yeah and

FUCK YOU, YOU FUCKING TWITS
that one especially goes to the guy who got became so offended when he heard FUCK YOU

(yeah- i gots a potty mouth)

what if it was your kid?
why i bet you'd cry bloody murder!!!

here's another:

would it not be prudent for a person who has such allergies to avoid jobs
that seal them up in a building with hundreds of other people?
i mean come on

really- thank god i only live here 6 months out of the year.

seattle is so full of shit.

and racist.

just ask some of our local journalists they even think trains are whites only affairs!

we even have teachers who call students niggers!
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 7:34 PM · Report this
71
only live here 6 months out of the year.

Is it cherry picking time already?
Posted by emeraldkity on June 4, 2010 at 7:45 PM · Report this
72
ok seattle-
so a local journalist faces an injustice that affects him personally.
are you seriously saying that he should not write about it?
that its some kind of conflict of interest?
because he has a lawyer?

do you even realize what your point implies?

thats right:
closing down newspapers- death squads - curfews and dead reporters.

maybe they are getting paid to post.

thats right move along- nothing to see here

god bless the ol us of a where some one faces injustice- and nobody does shit.

on top they probably think they somehow 'deserved it'

Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 7:51 PM · Report this
73
hey emerald kity you know what? look up my i.p. address:
i live on mercer island - just think about that for a minute-
you probably work for me
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 7:55 PM · Report this
74
naw- I'm retired- perhaps you will get there some day sonny.
Posted by emeraldkity on June 4, 2010 at 8:01 PM · Report this
75
I'me white. Been asked several times not to wear perfume at work, by other white people. Asked to leave my doctors office once for wearing perfume because my doctor was allergic and there were signs posted "please no fragrances". The doctor was white too. If the exact same thing happened to Muddede he would think it was a racist attack against him and his family for being "brown".

I'm married to a black, er as Muddede likes to say "brown" man. My kids are bi-racial too.

My advice: save the powerful race card for where you need to call attantion to a truly racist act. Don't waste it. Otherwise you are creating a boy who cried wolf situation and when you really need it nobody will believe you.

Q: Why do you think the teacher waited until the last few weeks of school to single your daughter out? Did she suddenly become aware of your daughter being bi-racial?
Posted by Joplin on June 4, 2010 at 8:14 PM · Report this
76
I'me white. Been asked several times not to wear perfume at work, by other white people. Asked to leave my doctors office once for wearing perfume because my doctor was allergic and there were signs posted "please no fragrances". The doctor was white too. If the exact same thing happened to Muddede he would think it was a racist attack against him and his family for being "brown".

I'm married to a black, er as Muddede likes to say "brown" man. My kids are bi-racial too.

My advice: save the powerful race card for where you need to call attantion to a truly racist act. Don't waste it. Otherwise you are creating a boy who cried wolf situation and when you really need it nobody will believe you.

Q: Why do you think the teacher waited until the last few weeks of school to single your daughter out? Did she suddenly become aware of your daughter being bi-racial?
Posted by Joplin on June 4, 2010 at 8:17 PM · Report this
77
"would it not be prudent for a person who has such allergies to avoid jobs
that seal them up in a building with hundreds of other people"

Ummmm, would it be prudent for a parent that knows a teacher has an allergy to refrain from using products filled with known allergens?

Two sides to every coin folks. Life is a two way street.

Not saying the teachers actions were right. She could have opened a window and turned on a fan. She could have called the parents into the office and had a face to face conversation with them. She could have had the principal mediate a resolution comfortable for all. She shouldn't have removed the child from the classroom.

The teacher did not make the best choice in this situation, but neither did mudede who should have respected the teachers sensitivities.

But I don't buy for one minute that it was a racist act. That's just ridiculous. This isn't Zimbabwe.
Posted by Joplin on June 4, 2010 at 8:24 PM · Report this
78
Testing to see why my comments are being deleted??
Posted by Joplin on June 4, 2010 at 8:45 PM · Report this
79
Hopefully this episode of Charles displaying his innate TNB will turn the teacher into a n-wordmaniac. Come on over to n-wordmania dot com! All races of humans welcome! No n-words allowed since they are not human! Just replace the "word" part of the n-word with "you know what" in the URL!
Posted by N word mania dot com on June 4, 2010 at 8:47 PM · Report this
80
Whoops that should have been dot net
Posted by "nword"mania dot net on June 4, 2010 at 9:05 PM · Report this
81
Why has slog totally and seemingly deliberately ignored the story of Shane McClellan, the white West Seattle teen who was beaten almost to death and burned while being held captive for hours by a black and an Pacific Islander (Samoan probably), all because he is WHITE?

Why has slog completely ignored this important story? IT IS NATIONAL NEWS YOU STONED LIBERAL DIPSHITS!
Posted by Reality just doesn't fit slog's libtarded narrative on June 4, 2010 at 9:14 PM · Report this
82
no, not zimbabwe don't even fucking go there you idiot-
you guys sound like apartheid era south african boers!!

you sound like slave drivers!

you dont get the whole point of this! seattle is not as liberal as you may think. what do you think your hip asian or black friend really thinks about you?
or the scene here?
ask them!

racism is very well and alive here, no matter what you say.

just look around- and don't give me any of this reverse
racism shit.

typical- the ones in power are now oppressed by the minority?
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 10:04 PM · Report this
83
It's frustrating to see the lack of understanding and the extreme defensiveness that accompanies the claim that this is a cultural issue. Can you not put yourself in the position of an eight year old girl being removed from her classroom because her hair "smells?" Her hair that is very different from the hair of her peers. My nine year old daughter is bi-racial, and believe me that the majority of our race identity conversations have begun because of something to do with her hair. For her, her hair is a concrete symbol of otherness. Natural black hair needs a lot of care - it isn't simply a wash and go thing. And going with absolutely no product or oil is NOT an option. We've used the product in question, precisely because it has a mild, inoffensive smell. Far less than most conditioners. My heart hurts for Mr. Mudede's daughter, because I can so easily imagine the situation and subsequent feelings of isolation that go with it. Whatever the teacher's intentions; this was handled with a complete lack of sensitivity. To insist otherwise is to willfully embrace the same sensitivity failure.
Posted by Squirrel Girl on June 4, 2010 at 10:08 PM · Report this
84
just so things are nice and transparent- i have never met mr. mudede, nor does he know me. i am simply a local resident and Stranger reader, who will not shut up when the monster of friendly fascim (always racist, those damned fascists) rears its ugly head
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 11:21 PM · Report this
85
look it up if you think i am mistaken

1. seattle police shoot black people in the back for stealing cigarettes

2. a seattle teacher was punished for calling a student a nigger

3. a local weekly somehow thought trains where things white people liked, but other races avoided

you really want to tell me i pulled the race card to soon ?

FUCK YOU
Posted by on_the_lake on June 4, 2010 at 11:45 PM · Report this
86
If douchebag Mudede doesn't like it here he can head back to Zimbabwe and kiss the ass of a dictator like his dear, old opportunistic parents.
Posted by Mudede Can Blow Robert Mugabe on June 5, 2010 at 5:12 AM · Report this
87
Gotta love the feigned outrage of many commentors that Charles Mudede has a personal interest in this story. Maybe that would be a problem if he'd failed to disclose that the child was his daughter. But he was about as open as he could possibly be about that.

So, is the problem that, somehow, it just isn't fair that Charles Mudede has access to a wider audience than most of us? If that's it, I'd suggest the solution isn't for him to clam up, but to find ways to give more parents a public voice. Unless, of course, the real issue is that some folks just don't want to hear about race-related problems. In that case, silence is best.

In the end, it's impossible to know precisely what's going on in somebody's head. Maybe the teacher didn't consciously think to herself, "I'm going to find an excuse to boot this mixed kid from my class, and put her where she belongs". But evidently the teacher was almost completely unaware of how her actions would appear, and what they would feel like to the child and her family. That amounts to racial and cultural insensitivity, which is one of the things people are talking about when they use the word 'racism'.

In my opinion, there's much room for discussion about how to address this situation with some semblance of wisdom and compassion. This is no doubt turning out to be an extremely painful experience for the teacher, and nobody would want this kind of public exposure. I think there should be a productive solution somewhere between 'angry mob attack' and 'pretending there isn't a problem'.
Posted by SeattleM+M on June 5, 2010 at 5:21 AM · Report this
88
#87: Wish I coulda said that.

Posted by 2embarassed2byTP on June 5, 2010 at 7:45 AM · Report this
89
Unless, of course, the real issue is that some folks just don't want to hear about race-related problems.

Unless,of course, some people don't think this is a race related problem.

I think the teacher had a (physical not racial) reaction to the childs hair care product. A product which by the way that has a long list of ingredients that are known allergens. It also has some ingredients that have been banned for use in other countries due to their high allergens.

The teacher shouldn't have removed the child from the classroom, that's for sure. But Mudede needs to man up and take some responsibility too. The teacher sent a letter home a the beginning of the year to THE ENTIRE CLASS letting them know she had sensitive allergies and requesting their kids not wear heavily scented products to class. She also sent another letter home to all families after this little girl wore the hair care product to class that made her sick. Mudede chose to ignore the teacher attepts that didn't single his child out. So he plays a big role in this situation too.

This whole thing should have been handled better by all parties.

Now it's time to fix the situation Mudede. Go to the school, get a mediator, and sit down with the teacher, principal, and any other involved parites, and come to an agreeable solution for all. GET YOUR CHILD BACK IN SCHOOL. Let her finish her year and say goodbye to her friends.

You have done her more damage by making a media spectacle of her, that could possibly have been done by her sitting in another classroom until you changed hair care products.

And by the way your child HAIR isn't what made the teacher sick. It was her HAIR CARE PRODUCT. Don't lie.
Posted by Joplin on June 5, 2010 at 8:03 AM · Report this
90
Kill yourself today, Mudede.
Posted by Blow your brains out today on June 5, 2010 at 8:07 AM · Report this
91
My daughter was in that teacher's class last year. My daughter was asked at the beginning of the year not to wear lotions or personal care products with odors due to the teacher's allergies/sensitivities. All the other children in the class, as well as the parents knew of this issue as well. Children of all races wear products with odors that bother her, and she makes it clear that the products are not welcome in her classroom as they make her nauseous. As to the issue of the child being asked to go to another room, it is not a "lower" classroom, it is a same-grade classroom next door. The teachers at the school all rely on one another on a daily basis to temporarily take children from other classes for various reasons. When I volunteer in my son's Advanced Placement Program class, there are frequently children from the general education ALO class next door sitting at a table doing work or quietly reading. What does Mr. Mudede make of the predominently African American children being asked to sit in a class that is predominently white and asian? The APP and ALO teachers rely on one another for supporting all of the children in the school. For Mr. Mudede to lable the same grade ALO class next door as somehow a "lower" class shows his own insensitivities to other children and teachers who are part of the same school community. As to his use of the "f" word in responding to reader comments, is that the best journalism he can do?
Posted by TMParent on June 5, 2010 at 8:11 AM · Report this
92
This is The Stranger we're talking about. The f-word gets used in f-ing headlines. And frankly, if I'd spent two weeks with trolls going on at me about why my daughter smelled, I'd be on edge enough to drop an f-bomb or two myself on the next person who made me mad.

Once again, context matters.
Posted by janedeau on June 5, 2010 at 8:17 AM · Report this
93
(Off topic; but, maybe, straight to the heart of the matter):

#60 (Re: Self-Portrait) & (Brevitized 4 Clarity, and fun!):

"what you see is in fact an enlargement of i."

"understand i can, actually, enlarge the picture even more, and it only gets worse."

No, no, Charles; I really think you look Great!

(You may want to re-think the peering-around-the-corner-bit though. This is Seattle, and here we are, in the Twenty-First! Century.)
Posted by 2embarassed2byTP on June 5, 2010 at 8:31 AM · Report this
94 Comment Pulled (Trolling) Comment Policy
95
Secrete more apocrine? Isn't that like saying they bleed more artery?
Posted by janedeau on June 5, 2010 at 9:21 AM · Report this
96
In a situation of extreme allergies, it is up to the allergic person to plant the seeds of solution.
Why did she not talk to the child discreetly & then contact the parents immediatly in order to come up with a solution?
A caring, decent teacher would have at least done a google seach to help choose a product that would not cause a reaction, & then had a dialogue with the parents.
Instead, she chose to act like an imperial princess, used to having everyone drop & roll when she sniffles.

It shows what type of teacher she is, & not a good one.
Posted by Techjockey on June 5, 2010 at 10:57 AM · Report this
97
None of the people who say what the teacher SHOULD have done know, with any confidence, what the teacher actually did. So they should temper their comments with that doubt in mind.

Mr. Mudede's account of the events is not reliable. He acknowledges that he got it second-hand from an 8-year-old. He does not describe any conversation with the teacher. He does not describe any conversations with the principal. He does describe demands he made - demands that went unanswered.

He intentionally mischaracterizes the situation by writing: "my daughter... was ordered out of the classroom because her teacher did not like the smell of her hair." That's a false statement and he knows it. He persists in trying to perform some sort of verbal sleight of hand to make an allergic reaction to the ingredients of a cosmetic appear to be an aesthetic - and cultural - response to his child's hair. I'm discouraged to see how many people, including more repuatable journalists, were deceived by him in this obvious way.

This situation could have been resolved very quickly and easily if Mr. Mudede didn't choose to regard his daughter's removal from the class as a monumental, life-scarring humiliation, didn't choose to see racism in an allergic reaction, and didn't choose to be unnecessarily confrontational. How hard would it have been for him to choose another hair care product for his daughter or to talk to the teacher to seek a mutually acceptable resolution?

By the way, his daughter's continued use of the product is a violation of Seattle Public Schools rules that make it every student's responsibility to "Dress appropriately for school in ways that will not cause safety or health problems, or disruptions;"

In addition to this rule the handbook says:

"Students will also be disciplined if they fail to comply with any of the written rules and regulations in any other setting having a real and substantial relationship to the operation of Seattle Public Schools, including, but not limited to, the preservation of the health and safety of students and employees and the preservation of an educational process which is conducive to learning."
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 5, 2010 at 11:28 AM · Report this
98
As a kid I remember many smelly kids that maybe should have been kicked out of class, but never one who was overly fragrant.

This whole sensitive to scent thing has gotten out of hand and I had never even heard of asking someone to not wear a certain perfume or lotion etc. until I moved to the overly sensitive or scent-sitive northwest.

wokka wokka

Posted by alphagrrl on June 5, 2010 at 11:46 AM · Report this
99
I hope this little girl is not scarred for life by the actions of her insensitive teacher and parents. She is the true innocent in this situation.
Posted by That's What's Up on June 5, 2010 at 2:49 PM · Report this
100
The teacher should be on medical leave if she's that sensitive. And she shouldn't have treated the child like a piece of carpet or a lamp.

The school clearly mishandled this.
Posted by chloebear on June 5, 2010 at 3:18 PM · Report this
101
Mudede tends to hyperventilate over anything that doesn't fit within his world view, and leaps like a maniac into making sure That Justice Is Done, even if it's basically being a whiny bitch in the Stranger about it.

It's entirely possible that the teacher at the school is, in point of fact, allergic or intolerant of a hair product, something Mudede isn't even remotely considering. Hell, I've known people to whine about the gluten in the air at a brewpub and start making faces when bread comes out of the oven (and seriously, dude. You will not go into a celiac disease blowout just because I made some goddamn biscuits).

I can't deal with people wearing too much perfume at work; I've a reaction to it. So rather than donning the mantle of Expertly Oppressed Man, as Mudede does nearly every issue of the Stranger, maybe taking a little time out to figure out what the issue is may help.

99% of Charles Mudede's work for the Stranger seems to be "SOCIAL JUSTICE! To the SOCIAL JUSTICE MACHINE, OPPRESSED GIRL!" and 1% "And then that one time, when I was poor, and it was awesome." Reading this article, I wasn't shocked at all about the content or the way Mudede leapt into "action". It's pretty much the trick he's taught the pony to do, and as long as he draws dollars for it from the Stranger, he'll keep doing it as long as he can.
Posted by Malachi on June 5, 2010 at 6:34 PM · Report this
102
"As to his use of the "f" word in responding to reader comments, is that the best journalism he can do?"

...have you READ anything else he's written? I'm wondering if this is a rhetorical question, or if the general populace just reads the byline and goes "Oh, fuck, Mudede again, more self-aggrandizing wankery in print" and skips it, like I do.
Posted by Malachi on June 5, 2010 at 6:48 PM · Report this
103
Well Charles this article explains a lot, that you are racist along with your wife and daughter. According to you it’s always there, all I know is that I have worked and met a lot of minorities and the only people around them making an issue about their race was them. There is such a double standard it makes me sick, if I as a white person make a big deal and show pride in being white I am a racist but if a minority does it they are not and they are just showing pride in their culture. Unfortunately my experiences along with close family and friends leads me to believe the people like your self are responsible for the way people perceive you, you act like a racist so people treat you as one. You always play the race card because that’s the only way you can win a disagreement because you’re not smart enough to win a disagreement on its merits. The good thing is that you work for a rag that will put up with your racism, and not for a reputable paper that actually has a large readership. By the way, way to go in brainwashing your family and others on this site, at least you’re good at something
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 5, 2010 at 7:30 PM · Report this
104
I work with the public and understand the sensitivity to smells and fragrances, a coworker of mine was exposed to smell and or fragrance for extended period of time in an enclosed area. The results they had to book off sick for three days along with the loss of pay. The symptoms where before leaving work was severe headache, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, was hospitalized for 12 hours before they would send them home. But as long the customer got what they needed. No need to worry about the health of the employee. All because someone had to have a shower in a can rather than taking responsibility for their personal hygiene. As usual a weak minded man plays the race card because he has no other way of winning a disagreement and he also has manage to brain wash his family into seeing racism where there is none. And I am also amazed that the stranger lets this lying bullshit to be published but ignore a blatant hate crime that happened to a white person. I guess the only way to get attention around here is to be a whinny black asshole, cause I can guarantee you if a hate crime happened to a black man all hell would break lose, and Charles would be leading the charge. What a fucking asshole how in the fuck do you sleep at night or look yourself in the mirror.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 5, 2010 at 7:56 PM · Report this
105
Yes, the overly scent-sitive population are a problem in Seattle, and I'm not sure I agree that they have the right to tell others what they can and can't wear in the work place, in the classroom, on the bus, etc.

However, I think this is a PC, Seattle, over educated middle class over dramatized allergy issue, not a racial issue.
Posted by Joplin on June 5, 2010 at 7:58 PM · Report this
106
hey by the lake wtf your a fucking no life low life who robs and steals from the country you came to and then whines when they get called on it one day you will get what you deserve oh and by the way fuck you asshole racist mother fucker
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 5, 2010 at 8:01 PM · Report this
107
After reading the Seattle Times article, Mudede's article, the response in the Dominick Holden article, and the comments to both Stranger pieces, I have no doubt that none of us has enough information to come to any worthwhile conclusion.

However, Mr. Mudede plays the race card early and often, offering no evidence whatsoever that his "brown" daughter was a victim of racism. Then he plays the "It's a black thang, you wouldn't understand" card. Then he plays the race card again. The only thing that seems really clear to me is that Mudede has issues with white people. I sincerely hope that the child was taken aside discreetly and that care was taken to make the transition from one room to the other as normal as it could be. I have no faith that the Seattle School District would be competent enough to ensure that scenario, but it's possible. I'm sure that the Seattle School District has some very good teachers who care about their students. Maybe Mudede's daughter had one of those, maybe she was stuck with some pedantic POS, we may never find that out. I tend to always believe the truth lies somewhere in the middle, but I really hated Mudede's crappy article. So I hope the finger of blame winds up pointed directly at him when this mess gets resolved. White people aren't fucking your kid up Charles, you are.
Posted by IFHTP on June 6, 2010 at 12:15 AM · Report this
108

Funny story. My little cousin once stayed over for a weekend. We went to the store early in the morning, and she happened to see herself in a mirror on a shelf, and ran right out the door. Went outside after her, and she said she had forgotten to take off her night cap and fix her hair that morning and she was so embarrassed. I noticed, but her being 8 at the time, I didn't think she would care. But she did.

I am more concerned for a little girl that is turned out of class, then a nauseous ADULT. Regardless of letters, race, and sensitivity to smell, this was a child who was pointed out by a grown woman. For whatever reason, THAT should have never happened. I remember dreading having to read infront of class, let alone be kick out and singled out for an innocent reason.

Teacher is wrong. Child is scared for life. Does that seem like a fair result?
Posted by little_red_bird on June 6, 2010 at 12:37 AM · Report this
109
Sorry, Mudede, but you are being a jerk. I don't care what race anybody is--wearing fragrances in public indoor spaces is just an asshole move.

It's not your daughter's fault--she's only a kid. But it is you and your wife's fault. It looks like you did get notes home about the teacher's sensitivity. It's like you don't actually think allergies are real. Well, they are.

Your precious princess had to have her special products, and to hell with her teacher's health. It looks like all the other parents in the class found a way to send their children to school not smelling like chemicals, but your daughter needed her leave-in conditioner, because she's a special snowflake.

If this was such a great class that you were so thrilled to have your daughter in, why on earth wouldn't you have more respect for the teacher who has been teaching her all year? That product was making her feel like throwing up all day! Would it have killed you to stop using the damn perfume?

It's like you were looking for an excuse to complain about this teacher, which leads me to believe that there's more to this story than you're telling us. Did your daughter not get the expected A+ on her report card?
Posted by MichelleZB on June 6, 2010 at 7:00 AM · Report this
Canadian Nurse 110
I haven't read past @41 at this point, so someone else might have also said this.

@41:"So your beautiful daughter may not wear it 'daily' -- why wear it at all (assuming there may be a fragrance-free alternative)? "

Is the stuff that's so full of fucking racial privilege it makes me want to pound my head into a wall.

As a black Canadian woman, I've finally found a fragrance-free alternative leave in conditioner. I have to make it myself out of ingredients I order on line. It is double the price of using the stuff Charles; daughter uses and takes four hours to make enough hair product to last a month.

Can you imagine that the parents of a school-age might not have enough time and resources for this?

Remind me never to move to the US Northwest.
Posted by Canadian Nurse on June 6, 2010 at 7:23 AM · Report this
Canadian Nurse 111
MichelleZB @109:
OK. If "wearing fragrances in public indoor spaces is just an asshole move" will you find and/or make appropriate hair care products with no scent for Charles' daughter?

I can send you the recipe I use. I'll even send you the list of online suppliers I buy mail-order ingredients from. The times I've biked around picking up the products instead of ordering online took an additional 6 hours on top of the 4 hours it takes to make the leave-in conditioner.

Lemme know your contact info and you can start doing that for them.
Posted by Canadian Nurse on June 6, 2010 at 7:32 AM · Report this
112
Y'all might want to check out Charles Mudede's past writings about African immigrants assimilating African-American culture.

http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/out-o…

Makes you wonder if he was more upset about his daughter being moved to a classroom full of "the wrong kind of black people" than anything else.
Posted by Natalie on June 6, 2010 at 7:48 AM · Report this
113
Try this: www.thestranger.com/seattle/out-of-afric…;
Or search for: Out of Africa by Charles Mudede
Posted by Natalie on June 6, 2010 at 7:53 AM · Report this
114
To post 91: Exactly.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 6, 2010 at 8:47 AM · Report this
115
"ok seattle-
so a local journalist faces an injustice that affects him personally.
are you seriously saying that he should not write about it?"

on the lake, I think he should have been more objective in his assessment. Instead he started from an assumption and moved from there. It's one thing to write about institutionalized racism in our schools, it's another to call a teacher who has a very long and detailed history of medical problems a racist for being afriad she might pass out.

"do you even realize what your point implies?

thats right:
closing down newspapers- death squads - curfews and dead reporters."

A call for less emotion and greater objectivity (my main criticism) is hardly a silencing of dissent. I think it's a valid point that this story is lop-sided and it could have been done with greater tact while maintaining its necessary diligence. It's not unreasonable to suggest his monetary attachment (he makes his living in part off how many readers he attracts) is a conflict of interest here. Had he been more fair-handed, I wouldn't have to agree so readily that it begs the question.
To everyone else:
I find it amazing how many people act as if they were in a position to have a fecking clue about the reality of this situation. Here's a not-so-humble suggestion: learn the difference between facts and opinions; then respect the fact that your opinions aren't always in a position to be facts.
I feel my misanthrope on the rise now, so good day to you all and may someone not piss in your wheaties and call it milk.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 6, 2010 at 9:33 AM · Report this
116
Nobody asked Mudede's daughter to refrain from using a culturally needed african american hair care product on his daughters head. What was asked was that he not use THAT particular product (with it's abundance of known allergens) becuase that particular product made the teacher sick. This is America where we have shelves full of hair care products. Did Mudede try any others? Did Muded work with the teacher to find a compromise that would work for all parties? My husband is african american and he uses natural, minimally scented products. So do my bi-racial kids. Mudede should have made some effort. If anyone is racist it's Mudede, not the teacher, that send home multiple letters and requests before resorting to removing his daughter from class. Mudede may be married to a white woman but he definately has a problem with white people. That's clear from almost everything he writes, which is why I stopped reading his stuff.

I really feel for his daughter that will now have to put up with a huge media storm, the NAACP, lawyers, trials, certain ridicule from other children, etc., when all Mudede had to do was change hair care products. Geez Mudede.
Posted by Joplin on June 6, 2010 at 10:54 AM · Report this
117
I've taken the time to read all the articles I can find, and every single comment on this board.

What Not One Single Person has mentioned is that you don't have to be black, African, African-American, brown, whatever, to have curly hair of a certain texture.

I know plenty of "white" people that need products to tame their wild locks.

Mr. Mudede is just looking for an uprising.

Also, Mr. Mudede, the gentleman that you so kindly said "fuck you" to is of a discriminated group as well, but he's too classy to mention that -- or to, shall we say, "play his card."

City_Gal
Posted by CityGal on June 6, 2010 at 10:55 AM · Report this
118
I agree it sounds like it went too far for your daughter to be ordered out of the classroom on account of the smell of her hair...

I must say this, however: I clearly remember in 6th grade when we were studying Greece & Rome during social studies; one of the items the teachers had us see/touch/smell was a bottle of olive oil. When I took a sniff, I almost threw up. As an adult I still nauseated by full strength olive oil. For cooking, I always use extra light extra virgin olive oil, often in one of those spray pump mister bottles.

Perhaps that is an option for you & your wife to consider?
Posted by reddirt on June 6, 2010 at 11:41 AM · Report this
119
for awhile, I thought the author was white. What with the whining and all. Notice also, newcasts never mention the race of perps.?
Posted by torrent on June 6, 2010 at 11:52 AM · Report this
120
Seems like the real problem here is the unending racial problems of Thurgood Marshall and the APP program. If they had really integrated the school, made access to advanced learning accessible to more students, and reduced the racial tensions in the school and its programs... we probably wouldn't be seeing this flap at all. Would it really be such an abomination to mix the APP students with the "others"? Try integration, it works.
Posted by Anonnnny on June 6, 2010 at 12:03 PM · Report this
Some Old Nobodaddy Logged In 121
@91

What the hell is this person doing teaching kids?

If I've got an allergy to dogs, I don't apply to a pet store for a job.

I also have a personal story: I've got food allergies. I'm a good cook, but I never once considered becoming a chef, because I'd have to handle crap that puffs and swells out my mucus membranes. I have some humility, so I'm not going to get hired, then demand the owner take x, y & z off the menu so I can work.

If she's a teacher, she's obviously had some education, but it looks like she's an arrogant POS who 1)knows she's sensitive to personal hygiene products, 2) chooses a career where she'll be around multitudes of different people year after year, and 3) expects everyone to dance to her tune.

Fuck her.

(This doesn't address Mr. Mudede's hyper-sensitivity to race. As he's from Zimbabwe, it's understandable. That's one fucked-up country that has no end of bigotry, from both blacks & whites.)

Even if she _isn't_ a bigot, she's a major arrogant bullshit cookie calling herself a teacher.
Posted by Some Old Nobodaddy Logged In on June 6, 2010 at 1:08 PM · Report this
122
I challenge your assertion that "Getting entangled in a racial dilemma is something most black parents do not want for their children. It's just not worth the trouble."

I think that Black parents as educators who are charged with armoring their children in a racist society look at these situations as a part of real life - and an opportunity for real life training on how to stand up for oneself and challenge this conduct.

This personal anger that you direct toward her is valid, but it is misdirected only in the sense that this is not about this one teacher - but about a white supremacist system that has allowed these incidents to be perpetrated against Black children in this country's educational system for hundreds of years.

In other words, you and your daughter need to know that this is a continuation of some of the disrespectful incidents that Sojourner Truth - Harriet Tubman were subjected to.

Terry Howcott

Posted by Terry on June 6, 2010 at 1:54 PM · Report this
123
I gotta say, I just love the unaware KIRO commenter who wonders why the white 'family objected to the daughter being placed with black students'. HA ha ha...ha... interesting.
Seriously though.,
I would object to ANY child singled out for anything, publicly. and ANY child demoted for non-brain issues (and sometimes that too!)(At least the school lawyers agree with you.)
I think white commenters fail to understand the singling-out of the visible hair product vs the invisible hair product. Remember Jheri url? Afro-Sheen? Remember it on bus windows? I do. It was messy. But then I also remember white people (who thought they weren't racist) making jokes about do rags. People completely removed from any other way of living other than the white-bread way.
At first I thought that teacher wasn't racist but scentist - but the fact that she demoted a kid (and that all the kids in that demoted class were black) makes me wonder.
Charles, that teacher is seriously confused at least. If the teacher's allergies are that far gone, she deserves a medical leave. I say that honestly.
I would ask the teacher for an apology & an explanation so both child & teacher understand if not agree. Probably the teacher doesn't realize, but she MUST talk with you - for your own selves at least. For your knowledge -and for the kid's. So your child knows that grownups, including teachers, are sometimes confused, and sometimes fucked up, but she is beautiful.
Full disclosure - I am biased, as are all people.
I love Mudede's reviews
And I am a woman from SE D.C.
Who always wished for a silky curtain of blond hair, like in the ads,
Yet always envied the girls with cornrows and ponytail holders (evidence of maternal care & grooming)
And wished her Little Orphan Annie hair would disappear, like herself. (which is why I write this inebriated.)
More...
Posted by izzy on June 6, 2010 at 3:19 PM · Report this
124
@111 I did not know that wearing a fragrance of some kind or another was a medical necessity of life, how shocking to hear. Do you realize that being exposed to certain fragrances and smells are a medical issue it can cause a wide variety of symptoms such as migraine headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, blurred vision, just to name a few. How would you like to put your health at risk so someone can wear perfume or cologne or scented hair care product. No one has the right to endanger anyone’s health in the name of vanity their right to wear such thing end when it infringes on my right to good health, just as no one is allowed to smoke in public places anymore because to do so would endangers everyone else health and their right to not be subject to something that may cause serious health issues.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 6, 2010 at 6:28 PM · Report this
125
Mr.Mudede, I hope this is finding you well and in good health.

I wanted to make a few comments directly to you about this situation with your daughter and her school.
I am having a REAL hard time with this teacher treating a 8 year old child in this way.
(Maybe I am sensitive a bit, I have a 7 year old grand-daughter.)
I do not understand why the teacher(OF ALL PEOPLE) would choose to treat a child this way.

I have argued back and forth with several people about this and I will stand strong.
This teacher is WRONG!
You or your wife SHOULD OF BEEN CALLED by either the teacher/principle/district.

I totally understand the reasonings for the need to use oil/lotion in your girls hair.
My 2 grown daughters are bi-racial(black&white) and Ive always had product in their hair.

I feel that if this teacher is not able to teach the kids because of her whatever she calls it, then she should find another career.
I figure that there on average is 30 kids in her class X 25 years of her teaching career. THAT equals to 750 children. THIS didtrit feels 750 children should have to give up all lotions/perfumes/hair products/laundry soap...ect. because of 1 teacher?

I SAY HELL NO.

And it is sad that your daughter has now been made to feel bad about herself, as well as being confuesed, among alot more emotions.
I commend you for teaching her to be proud of WHO she is and WHERE she came from. Without seeing her, I can say, I already know she is BEAUTIFUL! Keep praising her, and she WILL be a strong young lady when she grows up.
You and your wife STAY strong and God bless you!
Posted by BuMama2you on June 6, 2010 at 6:35 PM · Report this
126
Woops, I forgot......

KEEP USING WHATEVER YOU CHOOSE TO PUT IN YOUR DAUGHTERS HAIR!!

PISS ON THAT TEACHER!!
Posted by BuMama2you on June 6, 2010 at 6:38 PM · Report this
127
Some people have a way with words.Charles not have way.
Posted by dani girl on June 6, 2010 at 6:55 PM · Report this
128
You assholes all you care about is someone’s right to pollute the air with their fragrances and colognes ok fine tell you what how about I just started to smoke in every restaurant in the Pacific North West because my right to smoke is more important than your right to good health. What a bunch of morons the teacher has a right to work in a safe environment. What should she do if a parent came in to the class room smoking a cigarette according to you nothing get a grip and but down your bong
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 6, 2010 at 7:09 PM · Report this
129
@111
You said: "OK. If "wearing fragrances in public indoor spaces is just an asshole move" will you find and/or make appropriate hair care products with no scent for Charles' daughter? "

My god, we've become so privileged that we've lost all perspective. It doesn't MATTER if she can't find the perfect scent-free product for her hair. You do not have a human right to the perfect hair care product!

We DO, however, have a right to a safe work environment. That teacher had a right to not be made physically ill so an 8-year-old could tame her frizz.

Though, for the record, here are your fragrance-free hair products: elastics, hairbands, and bobby pins.
Posted by MichelleZB on June 6, 2010 at 7:37 PM · Report this
130
Our son is in this class and he told us that the teacher went into the hall and nearly passed out. The teacher next door went into the hall to help and offered to bring the girl into her class for the rest of the day. I agree that the school should have communicated better and dropped the ball big time.

BUT,the worst part is that kids in the class are questioning if their teacher is a racist. Lame! This non-issue became 'news' because the parent abused his position in the media instead of handling it like anyone else would: TALKING directly to the two teachers who were involved! We almost made it a year without a race issue at Thurgood Marshall...I hope the teacher sues for defamation of character and slander!
Posted by dr_thompson on June 6, 2010 at 8:44 PM · Report this
131
I think this is much more complex and personal issue for Charles than his daughter.

A man who writes about race issues and how it disturbs him to find individuals of color subjugated to the predominant cultures views. From white dolls to white teachers he sees victims in all that are exposed to it.

Yes we get that your daughter is black, but half black as you are married to a WHITE woman. Interesting for one so attuned to a culture and a race that you could not find a black woman to marry when there are fewer and fewer black men available to black women. But this is not about that.

This is about the perception of racism to your daughter the LONE APP student in a school that just became an AP school this year. A school that prior to it had a series of academic problems and in a district that is largely populated by mostly poor and black students. A district that saw its black academy closed at the hand of a Superintendent who is a black woman and in a district largely (at least at JSCC) run by black women.

The schools are managed at many levels by minority Administrators and while many teachers are white they find themselves frequently if not regularly accused of being Racist. The term Racist is so frequently and regularly used that students in between labeling Educators as such do so to each other and frequently to those of another race.

Yes this is about Racism in Seattle. About a man who is so sensitized to race he had to make a mountain out of a molehill to dramatize his own problems with it.

If you were truly upset about racism you would move to a chocolate city...Oakland, Detroit or another where you could help those like yourself do more for your people. But who are your people Black Americans or African. You see right there is a whole 'nother issue.

But good deflection and blame laying. Very expected and very well ordinary at least here in Seattle and in the Seattle Schools
More...
Posted by GlamGal on June 6, 2010 at 9:07 PM · Report this
132
Kudos for hiring an attorney and working with the press.

The school and the school board, especially this ex-corporate waterboy Steve Sundquist, are too eager to sweep the behavior of teachers, principals and administrators under the rug.
Posted by WeeSchools on June 6, 2010 at 9:30 PM · Report this
133
@ 122 A racist society you say, the only person that has made race an issue is Charles and other minorities. The minorities from these third world back water countries are the racist ones, they hope to guilt everyone into being ashamed of the great western society that we have built and are jealous and envious of it because they lack the ingenuity to create anything on their own. They hope by playing the race card all the time they are saying gibbs me a dollar.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 6, 2010 at 10:09 PM · Report this
134
Mr Mudede,

I think we all understand that the product has been used all year.

But there was a parent commenting up there that the teacher was said to be hypersensitive because of the chemicals being used by some workers at her house. So this is just a recent thing, it wouldnt have been there all year long.

So please stop repeating this all year long thing and also consider that comment "your daughter has been black all year, too" thing.

I understand that its really embarrassing to leave because of this, and I don't think the teacher did the right thing. Maybe she shoud've stayed home til she gets better or something. Or just leave class and talk to you in person, explaining what her problem is. She had other, much better options and this was very unprofessional.

BUT do you really think you're doing the best thing for your daughter making this huge fuss about it?

"so fuck you and others who think this is really about chemicals and not culture" - is this really the attitude you want to pass down to your daughter?

Did you have a discussion with that teacher, when you tried to listen, too?

Isn't understanding each other the most important thing?

Posted by puck on June 7, 2010 at 12:35 AM · Report this
TVDinner 135
Charles, it's pretty clear that you don't believe chemical sensitivity is a real problem. You, instead, choose to see this as a cultural issue. It is a cultural issue: yours. You refuse to accept that you live in a culture that sees chemical sensitivity as a real and serious problem, and you refuse to accept that the cultural norm is to make a small accommodation to it by not wearing products that make people physically sick.

You immigrated to our country. Do what you want in the privacy of your own home, but respect our public space and our social norms.

You are so far out of line here that you've exposed The Stranger to a libel suit and made your daughter the subject of a public storm. You have so clearly illustrated that you have no understanding of the internal lives of children that I would hope your wife, at least, would have successfully petitioned you to STFU in the public sphere about this incident involving your young daughter.

But then, maybe that's the crux of this issue. You really didn't know what was going on, because you've left your wife in charge of parenting. Maybe you didn't even know that an email had circulated to all parents begging for a minor accommodation to the teacher's increased sensitivities, nor did you know what product was being used in your daughter's hair until after the fact. Maybe like a typical, misogynist man, you've claimed the public sphere to howl your outrage and wear sackcloth and ashes while your wife actually does the nuts and bolts of parenting.

You've already shown yourself to be intellectually devoid of any interesting thought (a simple search on this website for "Hegel" and "Mudede" proves that) and now you've exposed yourself to be an opportunistic fraud at your daughter's expense. You're a disgrace as a journalist, a disgrace as a parent, and a disgrace even as a failed intellectual. I look forward to the day The Stranger hires a real writer in your stead.
More...
Posted by TVDinner http:// on June 7, 2010 at 12:38 AM · Report this
136
I'd have to agree. Jumping to the assumption this is racially based is ignorant, and more improtantly racist in istelf.

What if it was a white child who had the same product, and was ordered out of class for the same reason? No outcry of race there! Again, why are we assuming she's lying about her reasoning? Solely because of the race of the teacher?

This is why we still have racial problems.
Posted by ddd on June 7, 2010 at 6:46 AM · Report this
137
Was that disgusting Voodoo potion really that important to your "blackness"? You should have some compassion for the teacher with allergies.
Posted by Whyte Ruez from North Mexico on June 7, 2010 at 8:34 AM · Report this
138
Does that hair care product contain any bovine urine?
Posted by Whyte Ruize from North Mexico on June 7, 2010 at 8:45 AM · Report this
139
I will save this article to read while I listen to the world's saddest song.
Posted by BowlofOranges on June 7, 2010 at 10:40 AM · Report this
140
everyone looking for an excuse to get free money. change to another hair product, there are many for african -americans.
Posted by redriverdan on June 7, 2010 at 11:50 AM · Report this
141
keep fighting; kids are worth it!
Posted by Virginiadanny on June 7, 2010 at 12:18 PM · Report this
142
Keep fighting, Kids are worth it....A single Dad.
Posted by Daniel Cleghorn on June 7, 2010 at 12:20 PM · Report this
143
Ha ha that teacher is gonna SUE THE SHIT out of mudede and the stranger!!!
Posted by Sue the shit out of them, teach!!!! on June 7, 2010 at 12:28 PM · Report this
144
"Our son is in this class and he told us that the teacher went into the hall and nearly passed out. The teacher next door went into the hall to help and offered to bring the girl into her class for the rest of the day. I agree that the school should have communicated better and dropped the ball big time.

BUT,the worst part is that kids in the class are questioning if their teacher is a racist. Lame! This non-issue became 'news' because the parent abused his position in the media instead of handling it like anyone else would: TALKING directly to the two teachers who were involved! We almost made it a year without a race issue at Thurgood Marshall...I hope the teacher sues for defamation of character and slander!"
I think this bears repeating.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 7, 2010 at 12:29 PM · Report this
145
"Our son is in this class and he told us that the teacher went into the hall and nearly passed out. The teacher next door went into the hall to help and offered to bring the girl into her class for the rest of the day. I agree that the school should have communicated better and dropped the ball big time.

BUT,the worst part is that kids in the class are questioning if their teacher is a racist. Lame! This non-issue became 'news' because the parent abused his position in the media instead of handling it like anyone else would: TALKING directly to the two teachers who were involved! We almost made it a year without a race issue at Thurgood Marshall...I hope the teacher sues for defamation of character and slander!"
I think this bears repeating.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 7, 2010 at 12:33 PM · Report this
146
Ah and also, let me tell you this.

I used to work as an au-pair for two families in London. One of the families had the granny living with them.
She was sensitive to all artificial fragrances, too, so when I went to work for them, I had to change everything: washing detergent, fabric conditioner, shampoo, hair conditioner, deodorant, to an un-scented one. Of course, no parfumes, or any other product that smells was allowed in the house. I, of course, exepted it and changed my products. Now this is a different situation, because I was an employee, I know. But the reason I'm telling you this is to make you aware how this sensitivity works.

She (the granny) was around 36 years old, and never before she had ANY problems with smells. Nothing. She was working in an office. Then, one day someone just didn't like the smell of the air, and started spraying that air-freshener spray, right next to her. Not in her face or anything, but she was standing close. She got a terrible headache and got nauseous and just felt like crap.
After that, she couldn't bear any artificial smells. She would throw up, or faint if she got in contact with a strong smell for a longer period of time. Believe me, its not a very fun way to live. She (for your information, being Indian) always cooked with very strong spices, such as curry. The kitchen always had a very strong (and delicious) smell. She was not bothered by this at all, only the artificial stuff.

Someone said up there that the teacher's condition was triggered by chemicals used around her house by workers.
SO, again, this condition would only be around for not too long, so it doesn't matter that your daughter has been using the product all year.

Some people said in the comments, that the teacher should change professions. Who knows, maybe she will have to! But if you ever worked in a school, you know that its not like you can just take off any time, you have responsibilities.

I still think the teacher(s) shouldn't have pulled your little girl out of class like that, of course.
But calling someone a racist is a very serious thing. Not showing any understanding is also a very serious thing.
Giving you daughter the impression that for any problem she has in life, the correct answer is sewing and making a big mess is very questionable.
More...
Posted by puck on June 7, 2010 at 12:38 PM · Report this
147
A little research - remember research? - has turned up this tidbit from the Seattle Public Schools Handbook of Student Rights and Responsibilities:

"every student must take personal responsibility to:...
Dress appropriately for school in ways that will not cause safety or health problems, or
disruptions"

Mr. Mudede's daughter broke the rules. She dressed in a way that caused a health problem.

The Handbook also says:

"Students will also be disciplined if they fail to comply with any of the written rules and regulations in any other setting having a real and substantial relationship to the operation of Seattle Public Schools, including, but not limited to, the preservation of the health and safety of students and employees and the preservation of an educational process which is conducive to learning."
Posted by The Rules on June 7, 2010 at 12:41 PM · Report this
148
Mr. Mudede,

Why do you think that the teacher is required to provide YOU with a doctor's note? The only people she is legally required to provide with a doctor's note is the district, should they ask.

OK so your daughter was the only person of color in the room; she was also the only person to be wearing a product that made the teacher sick. How is that racisim?

Would you have preferred that the school called you to come take your child home and return her once the offending product was washed out of her hair? If you knew the product had caused a problem the previous day, why did you send her to school with it the next day?

The product contains Peanut Oil. Do you know that there have been people who have become seriously ill and died due to peanut allergies, including a girl who merely kissed a boy who had just eaten a peanut butter sandwich? Would you rather the woman keep your child in her room, and instead, had the Paramedics called due to her allergic reaction? What if her allergies, already peaked because of the construction at home caused her death in the classroom? Don't you think that the teacher becoming ill or possibly dying would cause some sort of trauma for your daughter?

Sir, if you sue, please be prepared for a countersuit from the teacher. You were warned, even if it was that half day that your daughter spent in the other classroom, so you can't say you didn't have knowledge of the teacher's sensitivity.

You know, it's possible that the woman had been "sucking it up" the earlier part of the year until the construction made it all worse. That product could have been making her classroom a hostile work environment. You ever consider that?

A school here would have sent her home with a request to not wear the product, and if she came back with it on to create a disturbance, she would be suspended.

As for the classroom she was put into, isn't it possible that the teacher put her in a classroom where she could see her, and had the knowledge that the teacher could help her better than another classroom teacher could if she had problems.

I think you are making way too much out of this. Any other person would have just said, "honey, don't wear that to school" and let it be the end of it. Seems like you have other agenda. Perhaps it's getting some money out of the school district, perhaps it's publicity for you or your blog, I don't know. What I do know is that something that could have been settled amicably is now all blown out of proportion and that will probably make your daughter much more uncomfortable and could even cause some of the other students to treat her very differently. I believe the terminology is "making a mountain out of a molehill".
More...
Posted by former teacher on June 7, 2010 at 12:55 PM · Report this
149
I feel for you, but especially for your daughter. Please continue your struggle to make this RIGHT! However, please remember to give that teacher the benefit of the doubt. If she truly has allergies (as I do), some scents can be unbearable. The school administration on the other hand needs a swift kick in the rear!
Posted by Nance on June 7, 2010 at 1:04 PM · Report this
150
Mudede, you gonna get raped!

Oops, I mean sued.
Posted by You Gonna Get Raped! on June 7, 2010 at 1:13 PM · Report this
151
No 8-year-old child is responsible for the health of an adult.

Any questions about products, personal hygiene or clothing of a child should be addressed to an adult. Singling out a child in front of the class is damaging and unprofessional.
Posted by daisy-daisy on June 7, 2010 at 1:44 PM · Report this
152 Comment Pulled (No) Comment Policy
153
Putting a stinky, oily mess in a child's hair isn't smart unless she had head lice (which the oil would kill). But to sue is another example of greed, the thought process of an opportunist and low class skankiness. The teacher should never isolate a bright student and should have suggested to the parents to either cover the child's head if it was lice, or to use a less intrusive product which won't soil the backs of chairs and other items the child's head touches. The teacher is stuck in the classroom with this smell which the principal should have removed the teacher from, not remove the child. With different parents this could have been worked out. Not with these fools.
Posted by Lynn on June 7, 2010 at 3:19 PM · Report this
154
i have read and read all the posts on this and i cant believe that in this day and age that we are still using race to justify being a complete dumbass.from everything i have read from other students parents its not the teacher we should be pointing a finger at, its mr mudede.i feel sorry for your little girl and wife.they live in a house where they cant be proud to be white as well.i love african american people.my mom is married to a beautiful black man who has a beautiful family.he once told me that being black,white,orange or blue is only a color its what you do that makes it racial.if there was any harm done to your daughter it was by you and your need to make it about race.we are a great nation of many colors and its people like you that keep us divided.we are all children of the light and its how you live your life that matters and i know from expierence not all african american people use the race card like you like to do. i understand you come from a country that is very racially motivated but you dont live there now you live here and we have enough people using the race card to get what they want.WE DO NOT NEED MORE! how can a man be so filled with hate for the white people have a wife and a half white daughter and still be so racially motivated in a way that isnt fair to them???
Posted by corina on June 7, 2010 at 3:29 PM · Report this
Sir Vic 155
Charles, the reason SLOG got on you about the little girl in Vancouver is that it appeared that your first concern was about the race of the girl and that of her doll. Most of us saw a terrified little girl. Fear & compassion are human emotions, not racial sentiments.

The fact that you can look at a terrified little girl and worry more about her race than her safety .... well, I fell sorry for your daughter. You're playing out your angst with her future. How sad.
Posted by Sir Vic on June 7, 2010 at 3:32 PM · Report this
156
Are people really acting like EVERYONE doesn't use hair products with fragances?

Hello. Herbal Essence. Hello. Mousse. Please.
Posted by Mememe on June 7, 2010 at 3:53 PM · Report this
157
156: (whooosh)
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 7, 2010 at 5:18 PM · Report this
158
So sad you're teaching your daughter to contact lawyers over the fact that your child was placed in another class. Get over it. I doubt the teacher cared if your daughter was biracial or not..

People like you are the reason Racism still continues to thrive, because even if its not racism YOU'LL turn it to that.

You have no proof that its racism just like you have no proof that the childs hair product makes the teacher sick.

So get the facts before you start accusing.

Sounds like you just wanted traffic to your blog, and guess what.... You got it!
Posted by I am Biracial on June 7, 2010 at 5:27 PM · Report this
159
My daughter uses the very same moisturizer and I cannot fathom the idea of her being kicked out of her classroom for a smell that I do love and remind me of her everytime I feel it. Shame on the teacher, shame on the school, wish you the best on the outcome of this whole situatio.
Posted by aladames on June 7, 2010 at 5:33 PM · Report this
kerfuffle 160
I was reading the article while eating dinner and shaking my head, thinking, "How on God's green earth is he getting racism out of this?" and then, "I can't wait to see the comments online."
Charles, way to make a gigantic, explosive mountain out of a molehill. You, sir, are a drama queen. A shit stirrer. A wolf cryer.
A teacher who, after an event that inflamed her already scent-sensitive allergies, sent out a request that people take extra care with the scents they bring into a classroom, reacted to a scent in a product your daughter had in her hair. It does not matter what color your daughter's skin is. It does not matter the texture of her hair. On that particular day, because of outside occurrances, the teacher's allergies we particularly sensitive to that particular scent.
Could she have handled it better? Absolutely. Should the teacher have maybe called in sick until her allergies were under control? Probably. But for you to make an allergy issue about race is just ridiculous.
You're ridiculous, Mr. Mudede.
Posted by kerfuffle on June 7, 2010 at 5:35 PM · Report this
161
We are with you and yours, Brotha. That's just how most of them are. And, on top of that, their gov't condones and protects this type of behavior from them. Funny thing is that this happened in Seattle where I always see and hear white people shoving alleged 'liberal' politics down your throat. The only liberal politics they care about are white liberal politics....period.

WA state is nothing but the TX of the west coast. A bunch of tree hugging rednecks....
Posted by Six Five Son of a Slave on June 7, 2010 at 6:24 PM · Report this
162
We are with you and yours, Brotha. That's just how most of them are. And, on top of that, their gov't condones and protects this type of behavior from them. Funny thing is that this happened in Seattle where I always see and hear white people shoving alleged 'liberal' politics down your throat. The only liberal politics they care about are white liberal politics....period.

WA state is nothing but the TX of the west coast. A bunch of tree hugging rednecks....
Posted by Six Five Son of a Slave on June 7, 2010 at 6:31 PM · Report this
163
We are with you and yours, Brotha. That's just how most of them are. And, on top of that, their gov't condones and protects this type of behavior from them. Funny thing is that this happened in Seattle where I always see and hear white people shoving alleged 'liberal' politics down your throat. The only liberal politics they care about are white liberal politics....period.

WA state is nothing but the TX of the west coast. A bunch of tree hugging rednecks....
Posted by Six Five Son of a Slave on June 7, 2010 at 6:31 PM · Report this
164
OMG! i am so sorry that your daughter had to experience this embarrassing incident. i'm a black american female, and i happen to use the exact same hair moisturizer your daughter does (it is absolutely wonderful, btw!) for the record, it smells like body lotion, if anything. no heavy petroleum smell like with TCB or other products... just a light lotion fragrance. and you have to be right up on the person to smell that! the teacher is full of crap. i'm sure her dog smells 10 times worse than your baby's hair could possibly smell. p.s. i don't know about you, but i am so over people and their weak constitutions & allergies. i guess i am blessed to be a strong, healthy person who doesn't have to whine about my reactions to lactose, heavy fragrances, cigarette smoke, grass, dust, animals, dirt, peanuts, MSG, white flour, white sugar... shut the f up, people. man up or get off the freakin' island. (ok, i rambled a bit, but you get my point.)
Posted by sparkle-in-seattle on June 7, 2010 at 7:04 PM · Report this
165
Sparkle, that's a pretty dull comment...

"but i am so over people and their weak constitutions & allergies. i guess i am blessed to be a strong, healthy person'

God forbid someone not be as blessed as you.
Posted by CityGal on June 7, 2010 at 7:33 PM · Report this
Delishuss 166
I feel like some of you commenters don't really understand what racism is. Sociologically speaking, white people in America can't be victims of racism unless they're in the minority in a community. Racism is only perpetrated when one race uses their position of power to discriminate against another. A white teacher sending the only black girl in the class to a different class with other black students is racist, even if it's not overt Jim Crow racism. Mudede complaining about it and taking action against the teacher may be prejudiced, but it's not racist.
Who gives a shit if the teacher is sensitive to smells? She's a TEACHER. Teachers shouldn't be singling out ANY students the way she did. Why are this grown woman's allergies more important than the psychological damage she did to a child?
Posted by Delishuss on June 7, 2010 at 7:47 PM · Report this
167
Charles, being a mother in a racially diverse family, I can fully understand your frustrations. My hopes for you and your beautiful family is that this ignorance is short lived and your little Miss can return to her class where she belongs I hope she feels no ill affect from this and becomes a stronger person inspite of it. Please keep us abreast of the resolution as I am most interest. To the school and the teacher I can merely say they should be ashamed of the treatment and lack of communication.
Posted by carysegura on June 7, 2010 at 7:53 PM · Report this
168
Good grief Mr. Mudede!!

I came under similar scrutiny when I attended school about my choice of cologne and appearance. I didn't start screaming racism and hiring lawyers. I listened to the faculty and CHANGED MY habits. I had NO problems after that.

Sending your daughter to class wearing that haircare product AFTER receiving notice about the teacher's allergies is just plain old race baiting.

You should be ashamed of yourself and you might want to consider returning to Africa.
Posted by Bibble on June 7, 2010 at 7:53 PM · Report this
169
White people have to deal with this "shit" ALL the time. The difference is we don't coat every fucking interaction in racist overtones.

Shit rains on white people if we have even second though about not enthusiastically accepting a doll of a different race.

You and your way of looking at things are slowly and surely wearing away my considerable outrage at actual racist behavior.
Posted by JimBoy on June 7, 2010 at 8:03 PM · Report this
170
The teacher in this case was COMPLETELY in the wrong. The district needs to be held accountable. You're absolutely right to pursue this with a lawyer. It's not just about what your daughter has been through, it's about making sure that no other child or family has to deal with something as ridiculous as this in the future.

Keep up the good fight, Charles.

Posted by Ohio reader on June 7, 2010 at 8:28 PM · Report this
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Six five son of a slave holy fuck you have just proven why people think black people are so stupid oh and by the way I am sure slavery was outlawed way before you or your father were born fuck are you ever a moron. But then according to statistics compiled by the Federal Board of Education black peoples IQ is about 73 slightly above being mentally retarded in fact in the early sixties they had to low the IQ limit for mental retardation so that not as many black people would be considered mentally retarded and you have prove the statistics right
Sparkle in Seattle I am glad you enjoy the product but I think that your smelly ass covers up the smell to you but to the rest of the humans you and it stinks I say humans cause all the evidence that I have read and seen proves that black people are subhuman beasts.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 7, 2010 at 8:35 PM · Report this
173
@166 WTF now you’re splitting hairs between racism and prejudice because minorities can have racist beliefs just because you’re in the majority does not mean that you cannot be a victim of racism especially state sponsored racism. Such as seeing a job go to a less qualified minority in order to meet some government quota, or how about a scholarship go to a less qualified minority to meet a quota the school may have. So please don’t try and tell me that the majority does not face discrimination or racism. Also who gives a shit if the teacher is sensitive to smells ok then who gives a shit about the way cigarette smoke affects you or anyone else cause that’s not the smoker problem it everybody else’s problem in the restaurant. So guess what myself and my fascist friends will be coming to a restaurant near you soon, cause who gives a shit about your health and sensitivities.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 7, 2010 at 9:01 PM · Report this
174
let's reverse this situation. if a non-white teacher was teaching a predominantly non-white or racially mixed students except for a one white student. one day the teacher tells the one white student to leave the classroom because the student is giving the teacher a headache from the whiteness/brightness that the student is giving out. The teacher sends the student to another class (maybe a class with a white teacher).

Yes, this would be totally RACIST! No social and cultural sensitivity what-so-ever.

Always knew Seattle people were non-tolerant, ignorant, racist, and yes! clique city....no, wait, I mean 'town'....no, no...sorry, more like territory. Without any ounce of culture, compassion, and empathy in it's foundation.
Posted by ghost on June 7, 2010 at 9:16 PM · Report this
175
in refernce to that crazy as shit ramble:
thats the beauty of it. the ol u s of a.
at the stranger we even have to deal with the disgusting posts of some illiterate internet troll from the ozarks.

when i moved here in 89 it was full of skinheads. who knows maybe he's a local
i thought they all went to the peninsula and then to idaho-
but hey i could be wrong.

whats funny is that free thinker like me gets poo poo'd by the stranger on-line community
- but no one says shit to the guy who is by definition, a racist- with nazis and a swastika for an avatar.

good luck 'doubters'

mr mudede: fight that fight! it is a worthy one

Posted by on_the_lake on June 7, 2010 at 9:35 PM · Report this
176
Oh man I just read the story of what happened to your poor daughter. What a horrible embarassment and it's aweful how your daughter must feel. whether the teacher is a racist or not I'm not so sure - if there was a reaction or something weird I understand - the most bizarre stuff sets off my reactive airway distress. but that the school has yet to issue an apology or have that teacher apologize or make any effort to get your daughter back into the school system and back into her advanced classes is outrageous and makes your thought towards rasism stronger in my mind. I hope to god that someone in authority steps in and sets things straight for your daughters sake and those of the students that are to follow in her footsteps for years to come.
now i don't know what this asian girl with a blonde doll thing is all about and why you are so upset about the situation. This might set off a battle cry of craziness - but what the hell! I'm a white girl and as a child i always wanted to know why i couldn't have the black babydoll. of course there weren't very many - but once i asked for one my mom made sure that i had one. (hell i ended up with quit the collection of dolls that looked nothing like me - then again nobody makes dolls that look like me but that's because I'm a rare girl with rare coloring and there aren't very many of me - oh so lucky! ) she said it had never occured to her that that's the type of babydoll i would want. maybe just maybe that's what that little girl wanted - and who are you or anyone else to judge her, the toy industry, her parents or anything else about what she wants to play with..
Posted by monkeypants on June 7, 2010 at 9:57 PM · Report this
177
Put some different shit in your daughters hair and quit whining. You're setting a poor example for your kid. I live in Georgia and know what racism is. This is not it.
Posted by smitty on June 8, 2010 at 7:22 AM · Report this
Delishuss 178
@173 You're right, I am splitting hairs. You're kind of contradicting yourself - minorities don't have the power to perpetrate their discriminatory beliefs on another racial group - because they're in the MINORITY, see? Minority groups can be prejudiced, but they don't perpetrate racism on white people because they don't have POWER.
Racism comes in two forms, one that's obvious and easy to fight against - like Jim Crow laws, internment camps, and lynching, and one that's subtle and easy for the power group to ignore - like an economic and public schooling system that keeps minorities at the bottom of chain. There's a reason that African Americans still make only $.74 to the white dollar, and it's not that they're "lazy" or they "aren't motivated." So you can whine whine whine and try to claim that affirmative action is "state-sponsored racism," but you're just flat-out incorrect. Not only was affirmative action instituted by the group in power, which makes it de facto not racist, but the fact is that white people still get the majority of the economic and educational opportunities in this country. If you didn't get a job because there was an equally-as-qualified minority applying for it as well, then too sad for you. At least affirmative action addresses the issue, I'm sure you'd prefer to ignore it or pretend it doesn't exist.
You equate sitting around smokers to what that teacher did? I can address any of my peers who stink like ash and they can respond in kind, but Mudede's daughter can't. Who has the responsibility to whom? The teacher to the student, or the student to the teacher - as you seem to claim? That teacher's allergies do not give her the right to single out a child in a class room and banish her. There were other ways to handle the situation, and she chose to do it in the way that would cause the most possible psychological damage to that child.
More...
Posted by Delishuss on June 8, 2010 at 9:13 AM · Report this
onion 179
mudede's constant animal-hating is a good sign that he's just as bigoted as anyone else. he hates fur like some white people hate curly black hair. his little jab at the teacher for not being bothered by dog hair is just another item on a loooong loooong list of writings that show his hateful obsession with animals. around here, where most of us are all fairly well-exposed to animals as pets, it is a bad sign when someone just can't get it that animals are worthy of respect and aren't the dirty curs that he insists they are. a lot of psychopaths start out by consistently abusing animals. mudede's animal-hating is kinda nuts.

homophobes that are repeatedly exposed to gays and lesbians often come around and end up respecting and accepting them as equals. those that don't are seen as complete and total assholes. there's a parallel here. pets are decent beings. animals have souls. mudede where the fuck is your soul?

people can have allergies to different things. one person's dog hair is another persons hair product.
Posted by onion on June 8, 2010 at 9:28 AM · Report this
onion 180
i guess i meant to say, i can't respect someone's objection to perceived racism (merited or not) if he consistently shows himself to be a bigot towards animals. the hypocrisy is stunning.

i am curious mudede - do your children have any pets? are they being exposed to the souls of animals at all? or will they grow up to be like you?
Posted by onion on June 8, 2010 at 9:33 AM · Report this
kerfuffle 181
@coolhandluke46, dude, shut up. If you are who I think you are, you're just as much of an ignorant fuck on the internet as you are in person. You are an expert at making a complete and total ass of yourself. There is a legitimate arguement going on here and you're just throwing a bunch of bullshit in the pot.
Also, learn how to use a shift key and some fucking punctuation before you start spouting off about how dumb black people are.
Posted by kerfuffle on June 8, 2010 at 9:43 AM · Report this
182
Sending someone out of the classroom for a bad odor is a terrible thing to do to any child...

why does that make this a race issue just because the child and teacher are not the same colour?

Any comment said to a person of colour should not be construed as a 'racial comment' that is absurd
Posted by n/a on June 8, 2010 at 9:44 AM · Report this
Greenwood 183
I pretty much don't agree with Mudede about anything (except when he's writing about jazz), but it seems like he's in the right on this one. Good luck with this, Charles. I hope this is resolved in a way that your daughter can continue her education.
Posted by Greenwood on June 8, 2010 at 9:46 AM · Report this
Delishuss 184
@172:
That's Cool Hand Luke, raising the bar for everyone.
Posted by Delishuss on June 8, 2010 at 9:47 AM · Report this
185
I notice there are no more comments from Muldede.

I bet his lawyer advised him to shut up as he was making his case even worse.

It amazes me how many people comment who have not even read any of the articles or comments.

This is not a race issue. This is a parent not liking the teacher (for whatever underlying reason) issue.

Oh, and Muldede and all of the rest of you "racist" chanters, Muldede's daughter is only half black.

Was she only half discriminated then? What about her white half? Does it discriminate her black half?

Get real and get over it people.

"People are people, so why should it be, that you and should get along so awfully?"

Posted by CityGal on June 8, 2010 at 9:56 AM · Report this
186
@ on the lake, yes I am a fascist I am not a racist but a realist that refuses to be bullied by the racist minority and there enablers and I do not want to promote violence against any minority group. However I do advocate separation from animals like you, for our protection. As far as you being a free thinker the only way you would have an original thought is to plug your nose cross your legs and blow hard, then and only then you may have a chance of having a original though.Because multiculturalism is a lie, that is portrayed by liberal Marxist media.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 10:04 AM · Report this
187
@181 I am 100 % sure you do not know me, and how dare you tell me to shut up I also have a right to free speech and do so research on the subject and you will see the truth. Oh but wait you believe whatever your told by the media and the minorities cause we all know they would never tell a lie to promote there agenda.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 10:13 AM · Report this
188
@ 178 I disagree because anytime anyone gets or loses an opportunity because of the color of their skin it is racist. Affirmative action is state sponsored racism because they judge you on skin color and not your qualifications, just because you’re in the majority does not mean that you lose opportunities to less qualified people for sake of skin color.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 10:19 AM · Report this
189
@181 Sorry that I was unable to live up to your liberal elitist standards. Just because you lack some punctuation does not make you stupid, But a 73 IQ does. You do not have a counterpoint to make so what do you do is criticize and call names. Black people have a lower IQ just do some research from the Board of Education.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 10:30 AM · Report this
190
@184 the comments made on 172 are facts, but it does not agree with what you think on that subject so you ignore facts. To all if ignorance is bliss then all of you are in paradise. Just to give you something to think about, Hitler was right and Lincoln was wrong.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 10:38 AM · Report this
191
It is amazing to see so much ignorance on this forum. First of all I would like to say for those of you who do not share the same hair type as most African Americans, you do not understand that we have to use particular ingrediants in our hair to make it look presentable. The Olive Oil hair lotion, DOES NOT have a strong smell. I am a chronic sufferer of migraines and I use the product. Everything that we put on our bodies has sometype of smell. However, could it be that she has a reaction to a combination of smells versus one particular smell? Those of you who use hair spray and gel (of the caucasian race)you also products with smells. I do not knock what you use, nor will I state that a product that you use has a greater or lessor smell than the one I use. I would also like to ask why wasn't the parents notified? The school should have notified the parents when this took place. I would be upset to find out that something happened and my child informed me of the situation. Lastly, to 188. I would like for you to do your homework. Affirmative Action is not based upon race. It will also benefit White American women who are also minorities. With that being said, if an African American and a White woman applies for the same job. They both have the interviews, to meet the quota the organization can hire (and in many cases do) the White woman. Also please look at the statistics the Latino and African American race is growing. In the years to come, the White race will be the minority and the others the majority. Based upon Affrimative Action, business will have to ensure that they hire more white people. Be patient, it just may work in your favor. Please educate yourselves.
To Charles, I support you. Please ensure that your daughter is still getting her schoolwork. I do not want them saying she cannot go to the next grade because of incomplete work.
More...
Posted by Astrea on June 8, 2010 at 10:41 AM · Report this
kerfuffle 192
I didn't know grammar and punctuation was a liberal elitist standard. Silly me.
Posted by kerfuffle on June 8, 2010 at 10:58 AM · Report this
193
I agree, kerfulle!

And to Astrea, you miss a few key points.

Did you read the article?

"I would also like to ask why wasn't the parents notified?"

The parents were notified, Muldede chose to defiantly send their daughter with the product the next day.

"The Olive Oil hair lotion, DOES NOT have a strong smell."

Just because olive oil doesn't have a strong smell, doesn't mean that one can not be allergic to it.

And who all those who write about racism, I am not challenging it still exists and affects many people to this day. That is a big issue, but not this issue.

What I am challenging is this specific situation.

If a white girl got kicked out of a predominately "brown" class, [since other parents of students in the class have written in saying Muldede lied about his kid being the only "brown" person in the class] because she did not obey the teachers request, then this would not be news.

I'd really like to hear Muldede answer some of Charlie Mas's questions. (#43)

I supposed the lawyers will be asking them though.

What a waste of our court system.

To quote Mulded himself, "so if i had used just cold water on my daughter and her things, like the other white students evidently did, none of this would have happened. im simply amazed!"

Yes, it is truly amazing!

Posted by CityGal on June 8, 2010 at 11:43 AM · Report this
194
I am so sorry for your daughters situation. I am a up and coming teacher and in those situations I have spoken to the parents and asked them to refrain from allowing that student to wear whatever the scent was. I have a pretty severe case of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity so I understand the student wearing something that makes a person feel ill. This teacher did not handle this well at all, but please keep it in mind that it might not be about race, it might be about a teacher who does not know how to communicate what she needs for her health...
Posted by grr12345558 on June 8, 2010 at 12:27 PM · Report this
195
I am so sorry for your daughters situation. I am a up and coming teacher and in those situations I have spoken to the parents and asked them to refrain from allowing that student to wear whatever the scent was. I have a pretty severe case of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity so I understand the student wearing something that makes a person feel ill. This teacher did not handle this well at all, but please keep it in mind that it might not be about race, it might be about a teacher who does not know how to communicate what she needs for her health...
Posted by grr12345558 on June 8, 2010 at 12:28 PM · Report this
196
I agree, kerfulle!

And to Astrea, you miss a few key points.

Did you read the article?

"I would also like to ask why wasn't the parents notified?"

The parents were notified, Muldede chose to defiantly send their daughter with the product the next day.

"The Olive Oil hair lotion, DOES NOT have a strong smell."

Just because olive oil doesn't have a strong smell, doesn't mean that one can not be allergic to it.

And who all those who write about racism, I am not challenging it still exists and affects many people to this day. That is a big issue, but not this issue.

What I am challenging is this specific situation.

If a white girl got kicked out of a predominately "brown" class, [since other parents of students in the class have written in saying Muldede lied about his kid being the only "brown" person in the class] because she did not obey the teachers request, then this would not be news.

I'd really like to hear Muldede answer some of Charlie Mas's questions. (#43)

I supposed the lawyers will be asking them though.

What a waste of our court system.

To quote Mulded himself, "so if i had used just cold water on my daughter and her things, like the other white students evidently did, none of this would have happened. im simply amazed!"

Yes, it is truly amazing!

Posted by CityGal on June 8, 2010 at 12:39 PM · Report this
197
How long had this student been in this class? Was she a new student? Was this the first time this teacher had come in contact with her? Was this the first time this student used this particular hair care product? Seems odd that a student you've had all year would SUDDENLY make you sick as a dog.
Posted by Primary Colors on June 8, 2010 at 12:50 PM · Report this
198
Its not racism. It is a hair product bothering the teacher. I had the same thing happen to me when I was in school. I am white and the teacher was white. My shampoo had something in it that she was allergic too. I even moved from the front of the class to the back of the class and it didnt help. The thing that bothered me the most was seeing my teacher walking around smelling students. All i did was change my shampoo and nothing ever happened again.
Posted by Drogo Boffin on June 8, 2010 at 1:21 PM · Report this
199
Wait, how CLOSE was the teacher to your daughter??? Seriously, I'd be wondering about the teacher invading your child's personal space.

And, this was recently, right? after your daughter had been in her class ALL SCHOOL YEAR? Gahhh. Now *I* feel sick. Can we get the teacher out of the room, please?
Posted by karma_musings on June 8, 2010 at 1:21 PM · Report this
200
Thanks for the panty shots in the classified ads. The whole office thinks they're a hoot. I'll make sure not to come back again.
Posted by Sitten Spynne on June 8, 2010 at 1:24 PM · Report this
201
I'm a white American with curly hair who uses that product. I wonder if the teacher would find it equally irritable on my hair?
Posted by Kalisa on June 8, 2010 at 1:31 PM · Report this
202
Mr. Mudede-I must say that it is unfortunate you have chosen to handle such a delicate situation in this manner. If your version of events are acurate, then I believe you, the teacher, the school district, and especially your young daughter would all be better served with a more professional approach.

Instead, you are using your daughter in what appears to be a "dear diary" blog and responding uncensored to public readers with no factual knowledge of the situation. How can you be unbiased in your reporting on this circumstance when it is hitting so close to home?

I can understand that you and your family have been hurt by this, but before accusing the entire Seattle Public School system-which educates children of all backgrounds and races-of such overt racism, let us have some unbiased and objective reporting from both sides so that as a public body, we can use such knowledge to support you without question.

My fear in the way you have chosed to act out publicly is that you are making a big stir out of an unfortunate incident that was never intended to hurt your daughter or make her feel inadequate in anyway and that you in fact may be the one doing irreversible psychological damage to her by convincing her of your one-sided point of view.
Posted by misjustice on June 8, 2010 at 2:01 PM · Report this
203
It's possible that the teacher is actually allergic to the hair product the girl uses--it does happen. Reactions to certain scents or strong perfumes in general are pretty common. The symptoms I get around perfumes are like what the teacher supposedly experienced: nausea, headaches, feeling light-headed or faint. I don't know if the hair oil is strongly scented; if not, this may not be a plausible idea at all. But if the teacher really is sensitive to it, she cannot help it, and it has nothing to do with whether she has pets or is allergic to dust, pollen, foods or anything else. You become allergic to each thing on an individual basis--usually based on sporadic exposure.

I don't think Charles is wrong to suspect that there may be a racial element, but the innocent explanation should be ruled out first. And the teacher should have treated the girl more sensitively, regardless, so this wouldn't even have become a question.
Posted by KittyKat on June 8, 2010 at 2:02 PM · Report this
204
coolhandluke46 YOU ARE A RACIST PIECE OF SHIT!!!!!
You are a disgraceful human being and you make me ashamed of being white. You are an example of what's wrong with America. People like you are why we even have racial issues. I hope you are as open with your opinions in person. And I hope you come across a group of black men and tell them your opinions. I would love to witness that!
You are a sorry excuse of a man and I'm sure you will ROT in HELL.
Posted by Ashamed on June 8, 2010 at 2:17 PM · Report this
205
I am disgusted by this teacher's behavior. How insensitive to single out a little girl, tell her her hair nausea-inducing, and make her leave the classroom.

How immature.
Posted by Curlysiren on June 8, 2010 at 2:19 PM · Report this
206
Uh...I dunno. My daughter is half-black, and I am white. She has a couple haircare products that I cannot stand the smell of. And I think one of them might be the brand shown at the top of this page. It is a very strong, pungent smell. Now, I admit I don't notice it when she is across the room, but if she walks past me, or if we are both in the bathroom doing our makeup, the smell is sickening. I would be surprised the stench doesn't bother her, if it weren't for the fact that she likes to wear Axe men's cologne, which has some of the most obnoxious odors on the planet. Still, having smelled the stuff my kid uses on her hair, I would have to guess that perhaps everyone is coming down on that teacher for racism when is could be another issue entirely.
Posted by aboda on June 8, 2010 at 2:46 PM · Report this
207
@ 192 its an elitist tactic to point out errors in puncuation or spelling but to avoid the subject or try to debate it at all costs. you do this because you have no counter points to make,because deep down you know it is the truth.
Posted by bite me you liberal pot heads on June 8, 2010 at 2:47 PM · Report this
208
anger and hatred, as a byproduct of fear, are destructive regardless of race, class, or chemical.

@mudede - true knowing comes from a peaceful place, one that doesn't require the understanding of others. you know that you and your daughter are innocent, let those who stoop rise up to your belief in your own innocence rather than coming down to bicker about comprehension.

Posted by lovewins on June 8, 2010 at 2:54 PM · Report this
209
For those who don't have time to read 300 posts trying to figure out what the Times didn't bother to report: this from an early post:

They didn't report that this teacher, who has severe allergy problems, sent a letter home to all parents earlier in the year respectfully requesting students not wear scented hair supplies and perfumes;

They didn't report that the girl wasn't "kicked out" or told to sit in the hall but that the teacher next door, coming to the aid of the teacher with the allergic reaction, had the girl join her class for the rest of the afternoon;

They didn't report that the teacher DID send home a reminder note about perfumes and scented hair products;

They didn't report that the parents then decided to send their daughter back the next day with the same product that was causing the problems.

Would these parents have their daughter eat a peanut butter sandwich at the severe nut allergy table?
Posted by BlowinYourOwnHorn on June 8, 2010 at 3:07 PM · Report this
Charles Mudede 210
202, seriously, people have to take race seriously. a white teacher does not not call a black parent after his black daughter has been removed from a class because of a common product that is in her black hair. i really do not understand why this "neglect" to call the parents is not taken seriously enough. she did not call me or the mother about a situation that had considerable racial/cultural implications. nor did she ever write and say directly: your girl's hair stinks to me, can you do something about it. never was i informed directly that my daughter's hair was making her sick. never. not at all.

and if any upset parent in her class thinks that some vague notice to two working parents about cleaning products, detergents, spores, and fragrances constitutes a direct message to me about my daughter, then seattle has achieved a new level of passive aggressiveness.

on the day she went to school--and it was i who made her brush her teeth (chemical product), shower (chemical products), put on clean clothes (chemical products), and do her hair (chemical product--and all of this done with the intent of making her presentable and not smelly!)--i had no idea that i was sending the poor girl into a trap.

coincidentally, the only black student in her class happened to be the only student in the whole class who used chemicals in her mouth, body, clothes, and hair that morning.

Posted by Charles Mudede on June 8, 2010 at 3:10 PM · Report this
Delishuss 211
@190 Okay, here's a thought exercise:
I'll take your "facts" as true, although I do so with a MOUNTAIN of salt (I'd love to see some credible sources.) However, your argument presupposes that there's some inherent genetic or biological difference between white and black (or any racial) intelligence. Here's a fact: the genetic difference between races is so infinitesimally small that it has absolutely no bearing on supposed racial intelligence.
(Credible source, BAM: http://wupa.wustl.edu/record_archive/199…)
That would indicate that your facts speak more to the inequities in our national educational system than any inherent difference in intelligence between races. You've just inadvertently made an argument for affirmative action. Well done, you shmuck.
Posted by Delishuss on June 8, 2010 at 3:11 PM · Report this
212
who gives a shit about any of this?
Posted by get a life on June 8, 2010 at 3:13 PM · Report this
213
@ 204 do you have any counter arguments to anything I have said or the best you can do is call names and make veiled threats. Yes I am this vocal with my opinions in person, and fear no man. I am not ashamed of the truth and I am also not ashamed of being white, or my ancestors and I who helped build this society that you are so ashamed of. For your sake I sincerely hope that you wake up to the truth before one of the animals you love so much turn on you or your family. The liberal controlled media hides the fact that there are more black on white racial attacks in the US than white on black, even though the black animal’s percentage of the population is far less than white. You tell me why this is, or is all you can do is call names and tell me I am going to burn in hell. The truth shall set you free but first it hurts, please for your sake try and learns the truth. The reason why the race relations are so bad is because of people like you who enable the black animals and turn a blind eye to their sense of entitlement. I challenge you to listen to some rap music it talks about overthrowing the government and killing whitey but if a white man made a song that said the same thing, he would be thrown in jail, but what happens to the black rapper, he is given millions of dollars. In conclusion I will continue to tell the truth about the black animal, and hope with earnest that you wake up to the truth before the black animal turns on you. When that day comes that you wake up to the truth you will be more than welcome to join my brothers and I in brotherhood and love. Please be careful as I really fear for your safety.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 3:15 PM · Report this
214
This problem was not taken care of properly. Maybe she was allergic to the smell. But handle it properly. I am allergic to lots of different perfumes but i handle the issue with care. Now this is a 8 year old we are talking about and the matter should have been taken to the principle and from there to the parents. And i am sure that the matter could have been taken care of. But, the matter was taken care of in a very disrespectful way. And there is no way that can be said that this was handled in a professional and respectful way.
Posted by Ruby24 on June 8, 2010 at 3:19 PM · Report this
215
@190 I am Sorry to tell you that the studies prove that the black people are little more than a smart ape, as such is an animal and should be treated as such, and there should be no affirmative action for animals. I am truly sorry that we do not see eye to eye on this but I do agree to disagree. There is no reason why you should call me names and insult me. When you do that you seem desperate and unintelligent. By the way you present yourself I know that is not true.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 3:25 PM · Report this
216
"and if any upset parent in her class thinks that some vague notice to two working parents about cleaning products, detergents, spores, and fragrances constitutes a direct message to me about my daughter, then Seattle has achieved a new level of passive aggressiveness."
Well Charles, you want your child's teachers to call you personally every time something comes up? The other parents in this class, whom I'm sure also work and are busy and distracted, managed to remember that they got the notice and what it said. Sending out class-wide notices is how things are done in schools. Or did you never get a permission slip for a field trip or special activity?
This wasn't abut the color of your daughter's skin until you made so.
Posted by BakerB on June 8, 2010 at 3:28 PM · Report this
kerfuffle 217
@207 - if you read up to 160, you'll see my opinion on Mr. Mudede's article.

@coolhandluke46 - odd how as soon as someone calls you on it, you suddenly start using punctuation and the shift keys. Good job! Thank you for conforming to my liberal elitist standards. I feel much better now.
Posted by kerfuffle on June 8, 2010 at 3:41 PM · Report this
218
Mudede, you are doing more to isolate your daughter than this insensitive teacher ever could. You constantly point out "white" teacher, "black" girl, "white" wife, "black" father. It is YOU that is enforcing the stereotypical separation that your daughter is, unfortunately, going to feel as a result of all this. I understand the issue needed to be addressed, and the school should have notified you and your wife of the teacher's sensitivity to perfumes via phone or in-person, but why are you the one shouting racism and being so quick to file a lawsuit? What could have easily been solved during a parent-teacher conference has turned into something that sounds pretty opportunistic to me. So sue the school, get your millions in compensation for your daughter's therapy, and send her off to an elite prep school, leaving her previous school to languish in horrific budget cuts as a result. Which will result in lower-paid, crappier teachers for someone else's child. But hey, you played the race card and won, so screw everyone else, right?

Posted by hellisotherpeople on June 8, 2010 at 3:44 PM · Report this
Charles Mudede 219
209, and this is the last time im going to say this: we recieved not one direct message from anyone about my daughter's hair. and, she was removed from the classroom by the teacher in front of other students. please, get your facts right.

i know who was sitting next to my daughter, i know what was said to her, and also know my daughter was sitting right next to embalming fluid. yes, chickens were being embalmed right next to her smelly hair.

there was no direct call or letter about my daughter's hair. and this is how racist the situation is--you really believe i was some uppity indifferent negro who willfully (maybe a shuffle with my daughter to the bus stop) challenged a directly communicated concern about her white teacher's health.

and also listen to your self here: "They didn't report that the girl wasn't "kicked out" or told to sit in the hall but that the teacher next door, coming to the aid of the teacher with the allergic reaction, had the girl join her class for the rest of the afternoon"

so my daughter stank the school up so much that the teacher from another class, without notice or call for help but just by smell and smell alone, came into her class and just in time rescued the fainting teacher from her smelly black hair. this is exactly what you are saying. that my daughter's teacher was rescued by another teacher without a single call or even whisper for aid or help. such was the alarm caused by a common hair commodity.

it is amazing how you guys will do anything to not see a situation as it is. it's utterly embarrassing. i say no more from here on.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 8, 2010 at 3:47 PM · Report this
Charles Mudede 220
216, im sorry. i have to break your heart. but all of this is not about smell. i wish it was, but it's not.
Posted by Charles Mudede on June 8, 2010 at 4:02 PM · Report this
221
I'm horrified by some of the nasty comments here. The treatment your daughter received from her teacher and the school is reprehensible. Thank you for demanding better treatment for her.
Posted by AZDee on June 8, 2010 at 4:20 PM · Report this
222
Indeed i must say that the situation is confusing for an onlooker who questions what it is that had happened. One might say that it is as simple as your daughter being removed for "racial reasons" but a thinking human might as well fault all that come upon the podium as being biased for reason that are hard to comprehend. We must agree that at times the obsessive use of various chemicals upon human body can cause sensations that are distracting. I have been subject to such instances my self on many occasions, whereby the use of scent and other personal care products has caused my attention to be whacked with extreme attention towards the object of origin (think school). TO remove the significance of this would be to remove the significance of human sense of smell... I love smell for it does illicit such visceral response. It would help to recall that a creature of reason does gather it's approach from the collection of sense which is contains.

So what did happen? Under what conditions was your daughter removed. It is wise to suggest that medical information regarding the instance be obtained, for this will provide much needed insight from all parties involved. To forfeit opportunity that is a mistake from those on the other end. Then again, many medical practitioners will view the sense of smell and the visceral responses it induces as merely insignificant things to be overcome by pure reason...
total nonsense.
Posted by billytheinorganic on June 8, 2010 at 4:26 PM · Report this
223
Charles, PLEASE, Do NOT stop defending your daughter.........
Fight for her until the end!
Screw that teacher, if she cant handle different smells then maybe....just maybe she should seek out a different line of work!
Shoot, if I was 'sensitive' to dogs and cats....
WHY WOULD I WORK FOR THE POUND?

MANY HAVE SCREWED UP WITH THIS.....

I say, make it right for your daughter.
Posted by BuMama2you on June 8, 2010 at 4:36 PM · Report this
224
I figure it safe than to also say that this teacher must NOT go out to dinner anywhere(people will be there with 'sents') NO mall shopping (again, people and their smells) NO grocery shopping(yep, once again, people with the smells) NO movies, NO public Libraries, NO bingo, NO casinos, NO public places at all!!!

I truly do not feel that ALL of these families should have to conform their HOME life(washing soap, hair product and so on) to comfort this 1 teacher. Plus all of the past and future students and families that HAVE been OR WILL be effected by her.
Seattle public school system should find her a job out in the woods far away from people and their kids and FAR away from any SMELLS!!!
Posted by BuMama2you on June 8, 2010 at 4:44 PM · Report this
225
Mr. Mudede,

I understand this dilemma and I wish somebody was there to fight for me when I was a little kid. As it was I got shoved aside and ignored in school, then beaten when I got home.

It was only later in life that I found out that I was NOT stupid and actually could have amounted to something. At my age I'm still trying, but I know the damage is already done.

I don't live in Seattle anymore and while I loved the place, it didn't take much to see and feel how very polar it really is.

The majority proselytize and intellectualize about things they could never really understand. I guess they feel threatened about not having the spotlight.

Posted by #7 Bus on June 8, 2010 at 5:03 PM · Report this
226
Mr. Mudede, I think comment 210 did much to clarify your position. It seems like you are trying to use this situation as a "teachable moment", which has kind of been lost in all of this. I don't actually detect as much venom towards the teacher in particular as I do the over-arching societal mores in play; The mores that blinded the teacher to the opportunity to be sensitive to race in a situation where sensitivity is so important (allergies or no). More than anything, I buy that you are a father trying to make the world a better place for his daughter. That isn't always comfortable and it might cause your daughter some pain in the near term, but I don't believe that you would use your daughter as link bait. If my 8 year old was in a situation where I felt his esteem, self-worth and sense of place were threatened I would do my best to right the situation. If I felt that his treatment represented a larger wrong, I would use whatever means I could to amplify my message. Let's not make this about hair products and allergies. Let's make it about how we deal with our children, especially those in various minorities where they frankly have a steep hill to climb just to reach the plateau that those in the majority start from. Keep strong.
Posted by anativeson on June 8, 2010 at 5:15 PM · Report this
227
I'm stunned that embalming fluid was being used in the classroom and that it wasn't immediately suspect as the problem! I remember perfectly healthy high school classmates having to leave the room because of the smell when this was part of our lesson.I would think that a chemically sensitive person would stay VERY far away from it!

I've seen the posts listing the "dangerous" and "allergenic' ingredients in the hair oil and really, wouldn't EMBALMING fluid pretty much be one giant danger to a person with chemical alleries?

My daughter goes to this school and confirms that the class in question WAS in fact, embalming chickens in class. Surely THAT set off the teacher rather than hair oil!

As the mother of a biracial girl, I can tell anyone reading this blog that the hair issues start early-about when the kids start noticing all the cute, white, blond little girls in all the hair, soap and laundry detergent commercials, while the black girls are the ones in the anti-drug ads. I think my daughter was about 3 when she cried wishing she was white and had blond hair.

So sending a little girl out of class when she is the ONLY black child and blaming it on her hair is really just confirming the perception these little girls are picking up from the media every day.

But back to the embalming fluid-I just can't shake that. It's like standing next to a raging building fire and saying the smoke in the air is from someone's tea light candle to say that a hair product is worse than embalming fluid being used by an entire class. Now I can completely believe that THAT could cause someone to faint!
Posted by agibean on June 8, 2010 at 5:40 PM · Report this
228
"it is amazing how you guys will do anything to not see a situation as it is. it's utterly embarrassing."

What IS the situation Mudede?!

As far as I can tell, you have made a fucking mountain out of a mole-hill. You have cried "racism" to the masses via your blog, television, and newspapers. You've retained an attorney(s), involved the NAACP, and PULLED YOUR DAUGHTER OUT OF SCHOOL in an act of spite.

From what I've seen/read, NO ONE has all the facts related to this matter at this time, yet you seem to think it's okay to bring new "facts" to light as it suits your argument, while chastising others as they proffer opinions of their own.

Here's the most likely reality of this "situation": Poor communication on behalf of both the school and you. End of story.

Grow the fuck up. Get over yourself. Do your daughter and the rest of us a favor, let this overblown bullshit go, get your child back into the classroom and continue to write about important things, like how "Cats are not Dogs"...

what. the. fuck.

Posted by Un-fuckin-believable on June 8, 2010 at 5:47 PM · Report this
230
Regardless of the situation, your writing is terrible. Pick either first or third person and stick with it, please.
Posted by ijaas on June 8, 2010 at 7:29 PM · Report this
231 Comment Pulled (Trolling) Comment Policy
232
I can barely stand to read these comments; my daughter is in the class, I have no idea what the facts are other than the version told to me via my 9 year old. But I really have a hard time reading the "screw the teacher" comments. There have been ongoing health issues with this teacher all year, including fainting, so to say that things have been fine up until the moment Charles' daugher was asked to leave is very disingenuous. Now the teacher has left for the remainder of the year without having a chance to say goodbye to her kids and they'll have substitutes for the remainder of the year. Not a happy ending for anyone.
Posted by sad on June 8, 2010 at 8:08 PM · Report this
233
None of this, absolutely none of this, changes the fact that the person of authority in a room of children was not able to perform to the standard that is required of an educator. If you know that you could/will have "allergic reactions" that can keep you from preforming a certain job, THEN YOU ARE NOT FIT TO DO THE JOB.

Taking race completely out of the picture for a moment, and just looking at the facts, this woman is still not a fit teacher because she is not generally healthy enough to deal with the smells of a classroom.

Some have said that it was a "sensitivity" from remodeling at her home? I have never heard of that, but even if we do pretend like that makes any sense, she still should have taken a leave of absence. Her students would have been much better off with a capable and healthy substitute than with a ticking time bomb of a teacher quivering with fear that the wind might blow in the wrong direction and she might smell someone's lunch.
Posted by aclark21 http://www.satori-group.com on June 8, 2010 at 8:24 PM · Report this
234
I'm not sure how I feel about this.

On the one hand I think the teacher was way out of line to force the child out of the classroom...why not wait and send a note home at the end of the day? I'm not a teacher, but I know if I were I would hate to make a child feel different, alienated, or wrong. Childhood is hard enough.

On the other hand, I think I would have been as "sweet as pie" about the whole thing. "Oh, that smell makes you sick? I'm so sorry. We will start using a new product right away." That way when the bitch strikes again everyone will get to see her true colors. I'm more of a "let them drown themselves" rather than a "hold them under" person. I think it's so much more rewarding.

I'm also a) not a parent and b) not a minority...so I'm pretty sure nothing I say about this situation counts...and quite rightly.
Posted by RuthieD on June 8, 2010 at 8:27 PM · Report this
235
And now that I see it, comments such as #231's are disgusting, but that is bait that's not even worth touching.
Posted by sad on June 8, 2010 at 8:27 PM · Report this
236
@217 see you are still doing it lets not discuss or debate the subject at hand, instead let’s change the subject and call names. Classic liberal elitist tactic and kerfuffle you have learned it well.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 8, 2010 at 8:44 PM · Report this
237
Mudede said "seriously, people have to take race seriously. a white teacher does not not call a black parent after his black daughter has been removed from a class because of a common product that is in her black hair."

Let's use the same sentence but take black and white out of it:

A teacher does not not call a parent after his daughter has been removed from a class because of a common product that is in her hair.

The problem was the teacher not communicating with the parent, not a black/white thang.

Get it Mudede?
Posted by Joplin on June 8, 2010 at 8:51 PM · Report this
238
Mr Mudede, are you sure that your daughter being temporarily moved into a class full of "the wrong type of blacks" didn't have any bearing on your reaction to the incident? Was really just about the white teacher's racism? Your own issues about assimilating African-American culture were not a factor?

Does the following sound familiar? It should. you wrote it.

"Despite my absorption of black American culture from hiphop to black literature, I maintained my African/British identity, and never became an African American. But now I have two kids, who, despite being mixed (white/black), are considered black in this
society--the sad legacy of the "one drop rule" [...]. Will I react like my mother if my son comes home from school in sagging pants, saying nigger this and nigger that? At present, I really don't know. And maybe I don't want to contemplate such a terrible question."
Posted by Time to wake up! on June 8, 2010 at 8:53 PM · Report this
239
@238. Snap!
Posted by RuthieD on June 8, 2010 at 8:59 PM · Report this
240
@ 238. Snap. I love well supported comments like this!
Posted by RuthieD on June 8, 2010 at 9:05 PM · Report this
241
It's just unbelievable that this issue was even allowed to be reported by Charles. Yes, The Stranger is fairly alternative for being mainstream, but mainstream it is and doesn't Savage or someone think that there should be at least a little editorial accountability here?
The moment I read his article I wondered why he would make it so public and inflammatory.

Granted, this could have been handled better but why didn't Charles or his wife promptly talk to the teacher first thing the next morning? Or the TM administration? Or remember the notices about the teacher's allergies?

He's using his daughter for his agenda. EVERY situation is NOT race-related. Yes, some of us should be more "culturally sensitive" but why is it so hard to believe that some of us are just socially inept, tired & cranky, ignorant or maybe nauseous enough that we aren't thinking clearly and should excuse ourselves before we make a mistake in judgement? That mistake in judgement is not what his daughter's therapy bills will be for. They will be for having to deal with the giant chip Dad is always carrying around.
Posted by kerala on June 8, 2010 at 9:06 PM · Report this
242
Oh good grief. I don't see anything racist here other than that the author wants us all to think it's racist. For the people claiming, "OMG We're black people! We have to use products so our hair will look good!" Um, don't speak for all of us. You know what I use? Plain mousse, spritz, and hair gel on wet hair in the summer for curls, and regular hair grease on dry hair for flat ironing in the winter when frizz possibilities are less and my hair is perfectly fine. My mother and my sister both have hair that is usually associated with mixed races and you know what they use? Water and hair grease. You do not HAVE to use these things for your hair to look nice.

This woman was made PHYSICALLY ILL by the smell of this girl's hair. Her PARENTS should have heeded the note sent out in the beginning and actually tried to help the situation instead of saying they don't care and making it worse. I feel sorry for the girl, because she has a father who cares more about his agenda than he does other human beings.
Posted by Tired of the BS on June 8, 2010 at 9:18 PM · Report this
243
Thank you Joplin, #237.

"Mudede said "seriously, people have to take race seriously. a white teacher does not not call a black parent after his black daughter has been removed from a class because of a common product that is in her black hair."

Let's use the same sentence but take black and white out of it:

A teacher does not not call a parent after his daughter has been removed from a class because of a common product that is in her hair.

The problem was the teacher not communicating with the parent, not a black/white thang."

-----
I've been trying to write the same thing! No one responds to my comments though.

Muldede doesn't want to respond to direct questions.

Take another look at Post #196 or answer this, Muldede:

What makes this a race issue and not a teacher/parent/child issue?

What makes this any different than any other race kid in the same situation?

How embarrassing for you when the court tells you the same thing.

What a shame for your daughter... I wish her the best and that in 10 years from now she will still not be embarrassed over this.

Unfortunately, she'll be googlable and you have put her our there for her lifetime, or at least until she is no longer a Muldede.

Posted by CityGal on June 8, 2010 at 9:52 PM · Report this
244
The one piece I want to add - as my wife is an elementary school teacher - is that the concept of a teacher asking a fellow teacher from the same grade to take one of their students for the rest of the day is more normal than you'd think. My wife would swap kids sometimes if there were some kind of thing going on between two kids, to diffuse things.

And remember, unlike most of our job these days, teachers don't have the liberty to just take breaks when they want, to go to the bathroom or get a breath of fresh air. Their same-grade teachers are an important part of their support.

Posted by TeachersHubby on June 8, 2010 at 10:02 PM · Report this
245
dear Charles, I feel your familys pain. Please stop trying to defend yourself, you need not explain anything to those who will not listen. Seattleites think that everyone here is above racism. The Seattle School Board immediately assures one that nothing is racially motivated here. How the hell do they know? Not everyone is from here, they bring their racial prejudice with them, don't any of you dare pretend that racial prejudice is not alive and well in America. I am very careful to not raise the issue of race unless I can logically find no other reason to support another individuals actions against my ethnically mixed children. Even though a great number of Seattleites are above racism, please remember that there are plenty of uneducated rednecked prejudiced MF's out there and to deny this fact is willfull ignorance and denial of reality.
Posted by keeptawkin on June 8, 2010 at 10:04 PM · Report this
246
You will drive yourself crazy if you go through life trying to read and weave racism into everything that happens to you. Unfortunately, you'll drive your kid crazy too.
Posted by Joplin on June 8, 2010 at 10:25 PM · Report this
Toasterhedgehog 247
@7 and probably many others.

This is an off topic post, and has nothing to do with Charles' daughter and/or her teacher's reaction, which seems to be purely racist.

Off topic: Chemical sensitivity is more prevalent in upper middle class white people because they bought into the marketing of bleach and industrial cleaners as the only way to have a healthy home. Growing up in a sterile environment with cancer causing cleansing chemicals because your mom believed in better living through chemistry fucks up your immune system.

Once again, this has absolutely nothing to do with what's going on with Charles. Chemical sensitivity is not a psychiatric problem.
Posted by Toasterhedgehog on June 8, 2010 at 11:00 PM · Report this
248
Oh I have SOO much stupidity to address and intelligence to commend... but I don't have time for all that shit, so I will just say a few things.

1st. As a Black woman I know that when kinky/curly hair is treated properly it gives off some sort of aroma. In order to keep the hair from falling out our heads a lot of time, energy, money, and hair products are needed. So denying a young "brown" girl the usage of the products that keep her hair intact and healthy is just plain wrong. And although some will not touch on this subject, the products used on naturally straight hair hold far more offensive scents than those normally used on Black hair; I know this because I use both. So to deny this child the simple right of looking presentable at school is deplorable. Kids are innocent, ignorant, and naive which, when coupled with the abnormal, creates viciousness without regard. I remember in grade school how badly kids who were less than presentable were treated; whether it be their own neglect, parental indifference to their appearance, etc. Add on to that a teacher reacting in disgust to a young girl's appearance.

If the teacher was so dramatic that she was about to pass out then plain and simple SHE SHOULDN'T BE TEACHING WHILE HER AILMENT IS PRESENT. As it was said earlier, the amount of offensive smells emitted by children do not fare well a high sensitivity to smells. No child should ever be made to accommodate to the needs of a teacher. EVER. period. I don't want to go into the psychology of responsibility and accountability, but basically children don't fully develop responsibility, accountability, action=consequence, etc. skills until they get to about 18-20 years old (mind you this has been scientifically proven). So asking a child to change a routine for a reason they might not understand, because they aren't fully capable to empathize with the other party, and with an outcome that is not in their favor is unreasonable.

2nd. I can't say whether I agree or disagree with the racist portion of Mr. Mudede's argument. But I will say that if there is even an inkling of evidence that your child was being treated unfairly for whatever reason would you not retaliate accordingly and bring the offender to justice. Bottom line, racism or not, Mr. Mudede's daughter was mistreated by her teacher, and said teacher needs to suffer some consequences. If he/she think's that it is OK to handle the situation in that fashion (obviously the teacher does because Mr. Mudede speaks of no apology to himself or his child), they do not need to teaching.

@129

She has the right to wear whatever she wants in her hair if she feels good doing it. The teacher should have removed his/herself from the situation if it was THAT much of a problem. Obviously said teacher was the only one offended by the scent (which is very mild, I know because I have used that product in the past) so to make the child feel bad about herself for something she likes to do to make herself feel beautiful is WRONG. And as abundant many people here want to think Black hair care products are, it's trial and error. Because there is no uniform kinky/curly hair texture every product does not work for every hair type. So when you find something that works, you stick with it.

I am pretty sure you are a person of the 'lighter variety' with straight hair because of your comment. I have nothing against that but you are ignorant of the experience of having kinky or tightly curled hair. In a society where girls as young as 4 and 5 are getting their hair permed with toxic and dangerous chemicals this little girl DOES have the right to 'tame her frizz'. Just because the 1 (if I could underline this I would) teacher is made uncomfortable by a mild hair product that has not affected anyone but him/herself does NOT mean the little girl has to accommodate her.

And to address your 3rd point, elastics, headbands, bobby pins, hair clips, etc., etc., etc. do not keep kinky or curly hair in check. Plain and simple no explanation needed. They ASSIST in laying the hair down, but they would cause a frizzy, matted, tangled mess if used alone on kinky/curly hair. Any person who has every dealt with Black hair knows this. You shouldn't remark about things you know nothing about.

@151
"No 8-year-old child is responsible for the health of an adult.

Any questions about products, personal hygiene or clothing of a child should be addressed to an adult. Singling out a child in front of the class is damaging and unprofessional."

I completely agree!!!

@153
"Putting a stinky, oily mess in a child's hair isn't smart unless she had head lice (which the oil would kill). But to sue is another example of greed, the thought process of an opportunist and low class skankiness. The teacher should never isolate a bright student and should have suggested to the parents to either cover the child's head if it was lice, or to use a less intrusive product which won't soil the backs of chairs and other items the child's head touches. The teacher is stuck in the classroom with this smell which the principal should have removed the teacher from, not remove the child. With different parents this could have been worked out. Not with these fools."

Again with the ignorance. Most people with kinky/curly hair do not get lice. The hair product is VERY common, evidence by the above comments with others who have personally encountered it and have no qualms with it. The product CONTAINS olive oil but it's not like dumping olive oil on your head. As was said earlier, the product resembles lotion in scent and texture. Shampoo is more commonly used to eliminate lice, so your argument is invalid.

Overall, Mr. Mudede, I believe you made the correct decision and took the correct actions in defending your daughter. This ordeal should have less of a psychological effect on her if she realizes what was done to her is wrong. Also, your willingness to fight for her should strengthen your relationship and her self-confidence. I wish you the best in your endeavors, and I hope you win your lawsuit.
More...
Posted by tropicana on June 8, 2010 at 11:29 PM · Report this
249
What influences me to think that this incident WAS in fact motivated by race is that neither the teacher or the school even spoke to the parents before moving their child to an entirely different class. That's a huge red flag. If any child is moved to a different class for any reason -- even something like behavioural problems -- the parents should always be consulted BEFOREHAND in the decision to move the child.
Posted by Amanda on June 9, 2010 at 1:32 AM · Report this
250
keeptawkin, if you honestly believe these hair-care products do not cause allergic reactions simply because they are "all-natural", then your opinion regarding the colour of orange juice is no longer of any interest to me.

When I was a boy of about twelve years, I one day woke up with a massive rash all over my body. The skin of my buttocks swelled to a point where I could not sit down properly. I ended up scratching myself so hard that I bled in several places. After an injection of anti-allergy meds, blood was drawn and sent to a lab for testing. The result that came back was that this reaction had been triggered by exposure to a grass type so common that tracing it back to the actual location where the reaction started would be impossible.

I also have allergic reactions to household dust, a natural element so common that it figures in comedic or horror story routines.

People have a right to education and fair treatment regardless of their race. But they also have a right to raise objections when someone they are pushed into an environment with is exposing them to a product that is actually making them physically ill.

I will lay money down betting that this child is going to one day go into the world and say that Person X can't possibly be allergic to her whateverproduct because it is "all natural" and wonder why she got angrily chewed out.

For the really dense people out there: disease, bacteria, deadly fungii, and many other things that directly cause deaths... hey, they happen to be All Natural, too!
Posted by nautilus on June 9, 2010 at 4:40 AM · Report this
251
As a teacher myself, some things I would like to know:

1.) Is this the first time your daughter ever wore this product to school?
2.) Is it the first time she's ever been ejected from the classroom? If so, how long had she been a student in that class before this incident?
3.) How was the teachers demeanor while asking her to leave?

Given the absence of detail in your report, I'm inclined to just assume your overly sensitive to issues of race, and see issues when there are none. We've all had times when we feel unwell and where a particularly strong smell (even if it's not repugnant) can exacerbate that feeling.

Also, it's not as out of the ordinary to temporarily send students to another room as some of the commentors are making it seem, I do it regularly myself when it comes to behavioral problems. If the teacher has no previous history of racial bias (which is another detail you fail to inform us on), you should give the teacher the benefit of your doubts (considering your racial hypersensitivity!)
Posted by Samvega on June 9, 2010 at 5:11 AM · Report this
252
I agree that this is racist. You may ask which "this" to which I refer but you would only be exposing your racism. If more people would admit their racism the world would be a better place. Or something like that. If you disagree with that you are a racist. If you say I am race-baiting, you are a racist. Racist. Racist. Racist.

By the way, my culture is big on peanut butter but some racists have tried to prevent us from bringing any peanut butter products to school. They mumble some nonsense about allergies but they are racists.
Posted by Cletus on June 9, 2010 at 7:45 AM · Report this
253
Thank you for your blog. What the teacher did is wrong and clearly racist. I recently bought that same product. It has little smell and is quite pleasant. In fact it is made with olive oil which many white products are also made with. The teacher is clearly a racist and lying about the product making her sick. I too am allergic to perfumes and am sensitive to certain smells but as a teacher myself I am not allowed to pick out certain students and condemn them for their beauty product choices. I think the teacher is just uncomfortable having a black/mixed race kid in her accelerated class.

Like your daughter I was one of a very small number of black and mixed race kids in my accelerated class thirty years ago. As a child one is well aware of the fact that one is a minority in a smart class ad that the white kids are always wondering why you are there. Keep fighting for your daughter.
Posted by drvest on June 9, 2010 at 7:54 AM · Report this
254
Charles, I don't know how you can stand to read most of these heartless, ignorant comments. How anyone who has ever loved a child--how mothers and fathers of children who are your daughter's age--can spew such hateful rhetoric upon you and your family is beyond me.

Most of the comments indicate the failure of our society to understand racism in any terms other than intentional, hateful prejudice. Yes, I doubt the teacher *intended* to communicate racism to her students. To intend such a message, in 2010, would be, well, insane. But it was communicated nonetheless. Anyone who knows anything about the history of racial stereotypes in this country would recognize the meaning of the teacher's action--a meaning that exists regardless of her conscious intent.
Posted by Alex76 on June 9, 2010 at 8:06 AM · Report this
255
Wow. How incredibly sad and unacceptable. Even if race were not an issue here (and I believe it probably is) then this teacher's actions would still be reprehensible, based solely on the horrifyingly public humiliation your daughter endured. No teacher should ever single a child out like that. If she was feeling ill, she should have asked someone else to step into her classroom for her until she could deal with her problem. If the problem really was the hair product, then a very private note should have been sent home, a private phone call made, or a conference scheduled. Publicly humiliating a child for some innate portion of their identity, regardless of race, is never acceptable.
Posted by leaf on June 9, 2010 at 8:17 AM · Report this
256
Clearly, this is an opportunity missed by the teacher and the school to create an open dialogue with the parents. If in fact, the teacher is really sensitive to the fragrance of this hair product (which none of us will ever really know whether this to be true)a simple discussion with these concerned parents choice of fragrent products and her supposed sensitivity to this fragrance would have been far more appropriate. Personally, I would consider putting teacher's abash to a test, as well. (Not that I believe it would be a sound test.) Simply, consider changing her hair care product to a non-fragrant variety and re-introduce the young girl back into the class. Regardless of whatever the choice solution, however, I suspect with all the media uproar the teacher will find for some strange reason she is no longer nauseated by the presence of this child.
Posted by James3102 on June 9, 2010 at 9:13 AM · Report this
257
The school's lack of response and this teacher's reaction is uncalled for. When I was in school kids would douse themselves with heavily scented perfume even though it was banned and others were allergic and no one was ever kicked out of class--I have trouble believing your daughter's hair product is so strong smelling that it made that teacher physically ill.
In relation to the Chinese girl with the blonde doll--another example would be in the Sex and the City movie when Charlotte's adopted Chinese daughter dresses as Cinderella for Halloween complete with a mask of a white face with blonde hair. I was so disturbed by this image that I felt sick throughout the rest of the movie.
Posted by linz on June 9, 2010 at 9:32 AM · Report this
258
Re the embalming: from what I remember when my son was in that class, they mummified Cornish game hens with salt. See http://www.mummytombs.com/mummymaking/mu… for a similar project. I don't remember them using anything resembling embalming fluid at all, and I would be very surprised if it were allowed for third graders. (While the hens aren't supposed to smell if you do it right, generally someone doesn't, and I remember them getting a bit whiffy.)

Incidentally, while I believe the teacher did have an acute reaction to *something*, and I don't think it's actually *impossible* for it to have been an ingredient in the hair lotion to which she had somehow recently become sensitized, I really cannot picture how she could know for sure what it was that caused her reaction. I get rhinitis from allergies, and I sure don't always know whether it was from dust or pollen, for instance. But it isn't usually important to me to know which.
Posted by janedeau on June 9, 2010 at 9:48 AM · Report this
259
It seems pretty clear that if this whole situation was an honest mistake the school and the teacher would be falling all over themselves to apologize--that's how sincere people handle it when they've accidentally caused someone pain. And I've done some teaching, too--if I knew had made one of my students feel like I was picking her out for her race, I would feel terrible and would want to fix it as much as I could.

Obviously, there's a lot to this situation--how genuine are the teacher's chemical sensitivities? How much effort should be expected of parents? How much effort should the school put into communicating this kind of thing? But someone who actually wants not to be racially insensitive steps ups and apologizes--that's the proof.

Also, where the heck are the mods on this site? I co-moderate a news site and garbage about "oh, are black people really as intelligent as whites?" like what's above would be so gone so fast...We'd have the poster's IP and it would be a cold day in hell before that person was commenting on our site again. If Seattle really doesn't want to be a white supremacist town, you've got to stop making space for these maggots. They bring nothing to the table and their repulsive comments drive good people away.
Posted by Greyhands on June 9, 2010 at 9:55 AM · Report this
260
I don't get it. Isn't an easy way to test the whole theory to just switch the conditioner without telling the teacher? That way, if the teacher is still disgusted, you know it's actually racism. If the teacher is fine with it, you know it was never racism in the first place. Why make a huge deal out of it with an article and attorneys without first testing the basic theory of racism? Did you even bother consulting with the teacher before undertaking any of this stuff?
Posted by Jumping to Conclusions on June 9, 2010 at 10:08 AM · Report this
261
You brought up the fact that the teacher owns a dog as part of the offense- "Meaning a dog's hair gives the teacher less problems than my daughter's human but curly hair."

Um, it's not your daughter's HAIR that is causing the problems but the PERFUME in her HAIR PRODUCT. Yes, it is possible your teacher has a chemical sensitivity problem but not an allergy to dog hair. It's not as ironic or suspect as you are trying to make it
Posted by jannet 123 on June 9, 2010 at 10:35 AM · Report this
262
"the support for this teacher's sensitive to smells is matched by a complete indifference to cultural sensitivity."
"so fuck you and others who think this is really about chemicals and not culture."

(both quotes from Charles. Um, ok, Charles. The woman has severe allergies that make her pass out but enough about that... let's talk about culture! Typical. I wonder how you would feel if people refused to accomodate your health needs because they felt this was "culturally insensitive". You make it sound like this woman is a primadonna. Her ability to function is at stake and you want to debate the cultural sensitivity aspects to her needs. YOU are the one that is rude
Posted by Henrinna on June 9, 2010 at 10:54 AM · Report this
263
"It seems pretty clear that if this whole situation was an honest mistake the school and the teacher would be falling all over themselves to apologize--that's how sincere people handle it when they've accidentally caused someone pain."

Actually, no. I mean, you're right about sincere people in general, but the policy at schools is very often to start stonewalling as soon as there's a whiff of a problem. I've had trouble getting teachers or administrators to even answer my email or phone messages when I had a problem to talk about. Not every time there was a problem, thank goodness (and I have known several teachers and administrators who were quite the opposite and very proactive communicators), but it's certainly happened.
Posted by janedeau on June 9, 2010 at 11:34 AM · Report this
264
All I can say is that after working on a large display project with spray adhesives, I developed several immediate health problems - migraines, feeling sick and lightheaded.. even though I was in a ventilated area. To this day, I have a heightened sensitivity to chemicals, fragrances and vapors. I've also discovered I have a heightened sense of smell - to certain smells that do not affect others. By looking at the ingredients in this product I know it would have serious effects for me and I could not be around it. Given the statement above about the teacher's reaction to recent construction work and letters that went out to parents (which you didn't get or chose to ignore)- I totally understand that it was not racially motivated. Don't be so quick to blame it all on race.. and the Chinese girl with a blond doll? Are you kidding me? I have dark hair... I have had blonde and red headed dolls... maybe she has an Anglo parent.. or just liked the doll. Did it ever occur to you that perhaps this girl actually picked out the doll herself. Perhaps you are the racist. You are blinded by your own tunnel vision. Get over yourself.
Posted by Black Irish on June 9, 2010 at 11:45 AM · Report this
kerfuffle 265
@237 - AMEN! Thank you!
Posted by kerfuffle on June 9, 2010 at 12:41 PM · Report this
266
The teacher was insensitive in the way that she thought of her own needs without considering the impact her actions might have upon Mudede's daughter. Singling a child out and placing her in another classroom without adequate and kind explanation as to why was inappropriate. And unfortunately because of the axe her father has to grind, the interpretation that Mudede's daughter will take out of this situation will do her more harm than finding another hair product and continuing her education would have.

Mudede was and is being rather insensitive by immediately determining that the only possible reason that his daughter was removed was because of the color of her skin. His daughter has had an entire years worth of education under this woman. Surely her hatred of brown skinned peoples would have been apparent before! Surely he would have countless examples of how she has mistreated his daughter. But if we asked Mudede's daughter about her teacher, what would she say? Would she remember cold shoulders, smoldering glances, and inexplicably marked down grades? Or would she tell us about a kind woman who didn't treat her any differently from the other kids, who listened attentively, and who had difficulties concentrating on being the best teacher she could be because of her sensitivity to certain chemicals? Characterizing this woman in a city wide rag as being racist due to one incident is cruel. Just as she should have been more sensitive about the unique experience Mudede's daughter went through because of the context her skin tone places upon the situation, Mudede should also be considerate of the teacher's own unique experience and her need for a fragrance free environment and he clearly is not.

It would have been incredibly simple to determine the teacher's intentions: the next day, have your daughter refrain from using the hair lotion. If the teacher continues to have an issue with your daughter, then you can interpret her action as having hidden motivations. But if you force a conflict by sending your daughter to school the next day wearing the same problematic lotion out of defiance then it is you, Mudede, who has created a racially charged situation.
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Posted by gruntled on June 9, 2010 at 1:13 PM · Report this
267
The teacher was insensitive in the way that she thought of her own needs without considering the impact her actions might have upon Mudede's daughter. Singling a child out and placing her in another classroom without adequate and kind explanation as to why was inappropriate. And unfortunately because of the axe her father has to grind, the interpretation that Mudede's daughter will take out of this situation will do her more harm than finding another hair product and continuing her education would have.

Mudede was and is being rather insensitive by immediately determining that the only possible reason that his daughter was removed was because of the color of her skin. His daughter has had an entire years worth of education under this woman. Surely her hatred of brown skinned peoples would have been apparent before! Surely he would have countless examples of how she has mistreated his daughter. But if we asked Mudede's daughter about her teacher, what would she say? Would she remember cold shoulders, smoldering glances, and inexplicably marked down grades? Or would she tell us about a kind woman who didn't treat her any differently from the other kids, who listened attentively, and who had difficulties concentrating on being the best teacher she could be because of her sensitivity to certain chemicals? Characterizing this woman in a city wide rag as being racist due to one incident is cruel. Just as she should have been more sensitive about the unique experience Mudede's daughter went through because of the context her skin tone places upon the situation, Mudede should also be considerate of the teacher's own unique experience and her need for a fragrance free environment and he clearly is not.

It would have been incredibly simple to determine the teacher's intentions: the next day, have your daughter refrain from using the hair lotion. If the teacher continues to have an issue with your daughter, then you can interpret her action as having hidden motivations. But if you force a conflict by sending your daughter to school the next day wearing the same problematic lotion out of defiance then it is you, Mudede, who has created a racially charged situation.

@257 "When I was in school"
A lot has changed since then. We've been bombarded with an increasing array and quantity of chemicals in the last several decades and sensitivities which were previously unheard of or very rare are becoming increasingly common. Reactions can be severe enough to be extremely debilitating or even fatal. Schools have taken steps to protect students with peanut allergies, so why not protect their teachers and students from other similar issues as well?
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Posted by gruntled on June 9, 2010 at 1:23 PM · Report this
268
Now I understand.

This isn't about smell. Actually it never was. All of the people writing about smell just aren't paying attention. The teacher didn't react to the smell; the teacher had an allergic reaction to a chemical in the hair treatment. That's not really in dispute.

Funny thing, this isn't about the teacher's allergic reaction either. I get that now.

This is really about three other things:

1) It's about a teacher or school taking an action in a child's education (in this case having the student in another class for a day and a half) without informing the student's family about that change. That's something that would upset anyone. You want to know what's going on with your child's schooling.

2) It's about Mr. Mudede's report that his daughter was shamed by the episode. Again, this is something that would upset any student's family.

3) It's about Mr. Mudede's contention that his daughter was singled out specifically due to her African heritage. This is the element of Mr. Mudede's complaint which is both the greatest concern to him and point of greatest contention. It presumes a motive for the teacher that is not only not in evidence, but essentially impossible to prove. Near as I can tell, Mr. Mudede bases this belief on the fact that the offending chemical was in a product specifically designed to meet the needs of Black hair.

I am with Mr. Mudede on the first point. As a parent of school-age children I want to be advised of decisions made about my childrens' education. I don't know to what extent it is practical for the school or the teacher to advise families of these sorts of things or how promptly the families should expect to be informed, but I would think that this situation would rise to that level. I understand that the teacher might not have been able to make the call home the first night, but surely it could have been done after the second day.

Are we to understand that no one from the school made any effort at any time to contact the Mudede family about these events? That's not good and some sort of procedure change is definitely called for.

As for the second point, none of us who were not there can say if the teacher was cruel or kind. The child can feel shamed either way. We can't make conjecture about this. It could be that the teacher said or did things in a hurtful way. It could be that the teacher said or did things in a sensitive way but the child felt shamed nonetheless. We weren't there; we don't know. Nonetheless, if the child felt shamed then some action needs to be taken. Legal action probably isn't called for. A talk from the teacher explaining that she does not feel revulsion towards the child but an allergic reaction to a chemical in her hair product would be more helpful.

The third point feels like a stretch. Culture permeates everything in people's lives. Consequently, almost everything that we say or do can be attributed to culture and any negative reaction to something about ourselves can be perceived as a negative reaction to our culture. The option is always there. For example, I'm sure that there are people right now reading these words and reacting negatively. If I were to say that writing like this is my people's way, would we then conclude that their negative reaction is culturally insensitive? Are all negative reactions evidence of cultural insensitivity? In particular, can an allergic reaction to a chemical be perceived as cultural insensitivity?

Here's where I part ways with Mr. Mudede. It is enough for him to complain that he was not contacted about a change in his daughter's schooling and to complain that his daughter was shamed. His claim of racism, however, is unnecessary, unproven, and unsupportable. That part is much more credibly about chemicals and allergies than about culture and racism.
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Posted by Charlie Mas on June 9, 2010 at 3:21 PM · Report this
269
I have a question about the warnings that karma will somehow set things right; that karma will "get" the teacher. What did Charles's daughter do wrong to deserve such an awful experience? This idea of "instant karma" (which is different from the original ideas about karma) is that bad things will happen to bad people. What does that say about people who suffer? That they somehow deserve it? If you want good or bad things to happen, you need to take care of that yourself, instead of waiting for karma- whatever that even means- to do it for you.
Posted by And on June 9, 2010 at 3:22 PM · Report this
270
Mr.Mudede you disgust me. I am so tired of hearing BLACKS pull the race card every time things don't go there way.If anything you and many many but not all blacks are racist I know you have a white wife but that does not mean that you are not a racist there are people who are racist but tolerant some white people.
For example to my point of how blacks are also racist. Me and my boyfriend are on the metro sitting all the way in the back, my boyfriend is six foot five inches in height he can not comfortably sit anywhere else on the bus. So we are sitting on the #43 route in the back I am reading a book we are both minding are own business. There is only about four other people on the bus and this kid who is Black probably about fourteen fifteen gets on walks all the way to the back sits down looks at us and says " I hate white people I wish Obama would hang you all from a tree" I got up told the bus driver who is also a black man he does absolutely nothing about this.
Example number two again me and my boyfriend again are on the #49 at the back of the bus like usual a group of kids gets on the bus and this black kid has his cell phone music on and it is blaring in our ears and we ask him to please turn the music off we remind him of the rules on the bus about music devices must have head phones again we are accused of being racist.
I would also like to bring this up remember a few months back there was an incident in the Metro bus tunnel with a group of kids all who were black beating up a single black girl in an extremely violent manner.So I ask you this Charles Mudede do you know why the security guards did not stop it because the girl was a black minor they were afraid of getting sued by the parents of the girl who was assaulting the other girl. It was because the person doing the fucked up thing was black and most every time a black person is asked to do something they pull the race card as the reason they are being asked to do the same things as anybody else.
Also I would like to mention I am white my hair is also really thick I also put oils and conditioners in my hair, the teacher would have done the same if the little girl was an alien,white ,black ,Asian that was irrelevant.
I'd also like to mention how much I hate certain smells and yes sometimes its odd like patchouli oil I can't stand the shit I am not allergic to it but yes I have thrown up because of the smell. I also cannot stand baby diapers clean or dirty, Dr. Pepper witch reminds me of diapers, Axe body spray, pretty much any perfume that people seem to drown themselves in now days.
Charles you are no different than the black KIDS and I really stress the word KIDS because you act just like them on the bus who call me racist because I as a HUMAN have a right not to have to listen to other peoples idea of music (I DO HATE RAP)let alone what they think smells good to them but may not to me. When people put that much fragrance on I think they are trying to cover up an even fouler odor witch is a sign of an under lining health problem. And yes Charles I also have a right to stay away from people who may be sick with something that could make me ill too.
And last but not least when I started middle school I moved here to Seattle I was sexually assaulted by an eighth grade black student on my school bus. He grabbed my head and pushed his groin in my fucking face. I did the right thing by going to the office and telling an adult they had me go to the vice Principal of Denny middle school ( Mrs.Guilorry) who was yes of course also black she called the boy and his friend into the office while I had to sit there and listen to them tell her that I was lying right in front of me. This was after they had just started putting cameras on the bus so I begged Mrs.Guillorry ( that fucking bitch) to look at the recording of that day on the bus. You want to guess what happened Charles she told me to quote " Quite crying crocodile tears" and that if I lied again about something like this I " WILL BE SUSPENDED"
If I would have been black and the boy was white that kid would still be in trouble because now he would be a sex offender.I know this for a fact because later on that year at Denny our white male gym teacher was caught molesting a black female student and that guy had the book thrown at him ( this would be appropriate no matter what color you are ) How's that for racism CHARLES I really think you need to redefine your definition of racism and shame on the Stranger for hiring you the first rule of journalism is to be completely bias like if I was a journalist I would not put what I just wrote to you as my article about racism. You should not shit where you eat Charles I really hope they fire you and I will never read another article with you as it's author.
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Posted by MistyMoans on June 9, 2010 at 5:01 PM · Report this
271
I am so curious as to what the school's position is on this. That, is absolute nonsense. Unless the teacher can prove that a)she has allergies and b)has allergies to the ingredients in the oil you use on her hair this is all about racism. And she needs to go. And the school owes your daughter an apology, a public apology. This is not the 1950s.
Posted by EJoyce http://www.mybooksmyvoice.yolasite.com on June 9, 2010 at 5:16 PM · Report this
272
I have a work colleague who had some sort of allergic reaction to some body spray I was wearing. She kindly explained the situation to me and I never wore that or any body spray again. I even purchased unscented lotion to wear. The reason I did this, is that she was kind in her explanation. That's all the teacher and the school had to do - call the parents and let them know that the teacher had an allergic reaction to their daughter's hair product and ask them to kindly use another product. Sometimes all we have to do is be nice to one another and most things work out fine.
Posted by mtroulon on June 9, 2010 at 5:50 PM · Report this
273
Wow, this whole thing makes me so sad. I mean, one guy mentioned long ago that plenty of white people have kinky hair.

So what makes this a race issue, exactly?

This is a story of a sick teacher who sent out a message to her class' parents to communicate her needs so she could stay at a job she probably loved but clearly wasn't capable of doing... and a man who did not think the mass email or general comment about allergens applied to him. Certainly the school could have been better at communicating, but so could have Charles. Just WALK INTO THE SCHOOL and talk to them.

No lawsuits necessary. Certainly no Stranger article necessary. WTF.
Posted by kissmyapocalypse on June 9, 2010 at 6:19 PM · Report this
274
Uhhhh I apologize for the horrific white privilege running throughout this thread.

Mr. Mudede, good luck. I wish you and you're daughter all the best. I hope this doesn't hurt her in the long run--I hope she knows she's brave for dealing with all this and that her hair is beautiful!
Posted by Aidan on June 9, 2010 at 7:14 PM · Report this
275
Misty moans @ 270 Bravo, well said. The black race for far too long has been allowed to play the race card with impunity. They also have no honor and will lie for each other or ignore what another black person is doing to another race. The black beasts that have any kind of power use it to promote the hate whitey culture. All though if we say hate the black race we are subject to arrest and punishment of some kind. I agree about rap, I am curious how many white people have listened to the lyrics of the rap music. The lyrics are such as overthrow the government, kill whitey till they are all dead with no mercy. I challenge anyone who doubts this to listen to the lyrics, because we all know what would happen to a white man if he wrote those kind of lyrics, but replace whitey with nigger. He would probably go to jail, but what happens to the black rapper, (if he is not murdered by his own kind) he gets million of dollars. All for promoting violence against white people. But there are no black racist’s right?
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 9, 2010 at 7:54 PM · Report this
276
Adian @ 274 If you want to apologize for anything posted here apologize for yourself only, do not presumed to apologize for any of my post as I have a right to my beliefs and to post such. If you do not like them, too bad! I guess we will have to agree to disagree. Also for your own well being and others around you stop enabling them and making excuses for their behavior, as they will turn on you as soon as you are no longer any use to them.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 9, 2010 at 8:08 PM · Report this
277
"...and also listen to your self here: "They didn't report that the girl wasn't "kicked out" or told to sit in the hall but that the teacher next door, coming to the aid of the teacher with the allergic reaction, had the girl join her class for the rest of the afternoon"

so my daughter stank the school up so much that the teacher from another class, without notice or call for help but just by smell and smell alone,..."
How on Earth do you get the above to equate? "Smell alone?" It just said she came to help your child's teacher. It said nothing about what caused her to do so.

"nor did she ever write and say directly"
Were you ever contacted indirectly?
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 9, 2010 at 8:35 PM · Report this
278
@ReachAroundPuke

That Johnny-come-lately neo-fascists like you embrace Adolf Hitler as your ideal is a gut-busting gift that keeps on giving.

Adolf Hitler was neither Aryan nor supreme. Oh he talked a good talk, but at his core he was an insecure, germophobic little bitch. He could not live up to his own standards, because he was a whore-fucking, closeted Jew.

This much is clear: no amount of suspenders and boot polish will save your kind from the brown tide that's steadily scrubbing you from this Earth. Even if you fucks could manage your finances to the point where you could sufficiently arm yourselves (you can't, and won't hire Jews to do it for you), you don't have nearly enough frail white fingers to pull the number of triggers required to save your asses.

So go down bitching, wee Hitler, cuz you aren't going down fighting.
Posted by Black Rommel on June 9, 2010 at 11:25 PM · Report this
279
@270 Your boyfriend can't handle a 14 year-old kid? You're not dating a man, you're dating a 6'5" clit. Go tell your sob stories to a therapist.
Posted by Black Rommel on June 9, 2010 at 11:38 PM · Report this
280
Keep your head up, Charles. I'm not crazy about you('r writing) when you put naked women up on slog, or try and put too much in a marxist blender; but you're the reason a lot of people who arent seattle hipsters still read the stranger. And never even think of apologizing for being vigilant for your daughter.
Posted by Robert Lashley on June 10, 2010 at 2:52 AM · Report this
281
I fear there will be few people left who will take Charles seriously after his bizarre race-baiting screed here. It is so aggressively hate-filled and intolerant it does nothing more than widen or encourage a divide between races.

To promote such divisiveness may aid Charles' cause but it is harmful to society as a whole. Dang.
Posted by Cletus on June 10, 2010 at 9:13 AM · Report this
282
@ 278 Black Rommel, you have just proved your ignorance of National Socialism. Your rant and misinformation is astounding. Thank you for proving my point about people with no argument, call names and spread lies. I also find amusing the screen name you use, Black Rommel, as if you were anywhere near the man Rommel was. You have proven you lack of understanding and ignorance. You had better get use to saying would you like fries with that, or do you go around begging saying gibs me a dollar. There the black beast goes again promoting violence against the white man. There are no plans for any kind of armed resistance, although we would have the money and manpower if we decided to do so. Our is a resistance of waiting because we are confident that people will wake up to the truth about your kind, and your brown tide and the implications of what that means to them. Faced with those facts the will resist you and take appropriate actions. I try not to call names or anything like that, because it is not part of a constructive discussion or debate, however in light of your comments, you are an ignorant dumb ass fucker, but what is one to expect from a black beast.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 10, 2010 at 9:16 AM · Report this
283
Black Rommel, if her boyfriend was to do anything to the 14 year black boy he would go to jail cause he b raycist, you are A stupid moronic black beast and prove it every time you open those flapping lips of yours.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 10, 2010 at 9:24 AM · Report this
284
Sorry Charles. Kicking a student out of class for her ethnic hair products is unacceptable. I don't need to have kinky hair to know that.

A Chinese girl carrying a white doll is acceptable. Should she also be able to carry a Chinese-looking doll? But of course.

In fact, it seems to me that suggesting that a Chinese girl should have to carry a Chinese doll is only slightly less racist than a school making a black girl sit in a predominantly black class because her teacher isn't accustomed to her hair lotion.
Posted by madcap on June 10, 2010 at 10:11 AM · Report this
285
Now I appreciate the Slog for it's lack of censorship, I can say, for example, how I like to fuck donkey shit and the system isn't going to flag me.

But I'm really tired of reading coolhandluke's bullshit rants.

Now I don't agree with Muldede, but there's no need to spout obvious racist rants.

Yes, you have the right to believe whatever you want.

But we don't want to hear it.
Posted by CityGal on June 10, 2010 at 10:34 AM · Report this
286
"its" lack of censorship. Sorry.
Posted by CityGal on June 10, 2010 at 11:10 AM · Report this
287
That's interesting, one of my posts from last night didn't seem to make it. At any rate...

Um, FoolBlandDupe, you've used plenty of insulting language and I'll have to read more of your posts because your "arguments" I've seen so far aren't so great. Much like Charles' article, you seem to speak with agenda first and critical thinking second...my opinion, of course.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 10, 2010 at 12:08 PM · Report this
kerfuffle 288
But coolhandluke46 is SO charming! And he's teaching us such valuable and credible lessons! Let's give him a hug.
Posted by kerfuffle on June 10, 2010 at 12:36 PM · Report this
289
Madcap said: "In fact, it seems to me that suggesting that a Chinese girl should have to carry a Chinese doll is only slightly less racist than a school making a black girl sit in a predominantly black class because her teacher isn't accustomed to her hair lotion."
Never mind that the latter portion seems to be a mischaracterization, according to a lot more people (apparently) than Charles, including other parents and other faculty. Never mind that he has not been concerned for any point of view other than his own and that he implied it was the school who prevented her from returning to class when that was his call.
He's said he never received any direct contact, which implies to me he received indirect contact. Other parents assert they understood the situation regarding the teacher's health and seem to suggest they disagree with Charles, even going so far as to express the hope for counter-suit. Having some contact with the school and hearing what I have heard, I would have to agree, though I have no idea about the laws that deal with these things.
I believe Charles is creating fuel for the coolhandlukes of this world and is more worried about being angry at a perceived biggotry than at respecting his own ignorance of what could have happened. And to what effect? That remains to be seen, but already it has created a lot more pressure on a group of people who already have a high-pressure job...which just also happens to provide the best free-ish childcare available.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 10, 2010 at 12:46 PM · Report this
290
Ok kerfuffle. Hugs are free I guess. I can spare only ONE! ;-)
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 10, 2010 at 12:56 PM · Report this
291
I don't get why he didn't just change the hair products, or maybe even pretend to change them if it's so necessary for his daughter to have THAT particular olive oil moisturizer. No reason for a little girl to be wrapped up in an adults battle, and especially a battle that never needed to be fought in the first place.
Posted by Dissonance on June 10, 2010 at 2:03 PM · Report this
292
Charles...come out, come out wherever you are.......:)
Posted by BuMama2you on June 10, 2010 at 5:52 PM · Report this
293
City gal @285 Just to set the record straight I am not a racist I am a realist, and firmly believe in the truth because the truth will set you free, but at first it hurts. I also have noticed how you have ignored BlackRommels comments and how he advocates Violence against White people, why so silent on that? I have never advocated violence against any human or beast; however I do advocate separation for the protection of all. I guess it alright in your mind to advocate violence but not to tell the truth. Also kerfuffle @288 I appreciate the sediment of a hug for me but based on peoples reaction to the truth including yours, I would take you up on that if I was not so worried that you may have a knife in your hand so you could stab me in the back as you hugged me.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 10, 2010 at 8:18 PM · Report this
294
Even though I am white person who was raised in the central district and as a minority all through grade school, it took me a long time to come to the point of acknowledging racism in this form. I believe Charles is correct, and I feel terrible that I have spent much of my life not legitimizing claims like this.

Please, everyone, watch a video called The Color of Fear. Here's an excerpt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vAbpJW_x…
Posted by B-Ro on June 10, 2010 at 9:06 PM · Report this
295
Wow... Suddenly I feel like I am back in GA again. Oh gee golly how fun. While it seems that this teachers response was pretty fucked up and quite possibly fueled by racism, it also seems that you are trying your hardest to use the race card yourself. I spent most of my life in the south and if there is anything I am sick of is race dilemmas, most of which in my experience has actually been reverse. Example? How is it that a black girl can punch a white girl in the heard on a public school bus, but suffer no consequence? Because the school system is worried about it becoming a race issue, yet if the tables were turned there would be hell on earth. I can name MANY similar situations. How is it, that it is only whites seen as racist? Everyone on earth has suffered due to ignorance or some sort of prejudice, Asians, Jews, American Indians...the list can go on. The difference is they don't dwell on it like you, they suck it up, realize this person is an ignorant POS, and move on. That being said, it's horrifying that your daughter has to be involved, things like that can have a negative effect on someone so young. I just hope that she doesn't become as hostile about it as you.
Oh, also, I have used the mentioned product on clients when I was in cosmetology school and the smell did make feel sick as well as give me hives when it got on me. Allergies DO exist, and there are many products out there now catering to courser, curlier hair. Keep that in consideration before you shout RACIST and save this community the ear-ache.
Posted by Sammich on June 10, 2010 at 9:15 PM · Report this
296
Please also watch this:

Good doll/bad doll: why black girls prefer white dolls

http://www.komonews.com/home/video/50018…
Posted by B-Ro on June 10, 2010 at 9:16 PM · Report this
297
This teacher was trained to be a professional. When dealing with peoples feelings, especially children, there are better way of dealing with a problem rather than embarassing them in front of others. I think the parents are right in dealing with it this way so that the child will not have a problem with her heritage like so many others do. It seems if the product smelled, the teacher should have talked to the parents like an adult first. So many Blacks are lost and feel they have to act, talk, and do like white people in order to be a decent person. All races have different things we do for good hygiene and that should be accepted.
Posted by deb in phoenix on June 10, 2010 at 9:29 PM · Report this
298
in the film 'cool hand luke' the protagonist was arrested for breaking parking meters.
today in the united states of america, we have many prison inmates who are arrested for simply being non-white.

Posted by on_the_lake on June 10, 2010 at 10:43 PM · Report this
299
THIS is why I'm so happy to have left Seattle forever. I can't believe most of you are actually feeding into this crap! Take a trip to New York and realize that Seattle is pretty much a racist little town. The worst racist here, however, is the writer of this article. He NOTICED a Chinese girl with a white doll? Um, not racist? Seeing any kid with any color/race doll shouldn't faze anyone in this day and age. HE is scarring his poor daughter for life, not the teacher. Plus he is a non-present dad, (until something comes up where he can vent in his semi-'famous' articles and feel superior, as well as getting people to chime in 'Yeah! Right on, brother! Power!' that just feeds into the problem as a whole) What does he get out of this? I feel so sorry for the child - to have a dad like him. I also feel bad for the teacher; she has an allergic reaction to a product (that I get sick of myself) and now her career is over. Didn't she send out a notice about wearing strong odors in class? YES, she did. Oh, that's right. Most non-present dads don't read the memos from school.

This is not a racist act. It's fucking JUNE! Don't you think that if she had racial issues it would have come out a tad bit earlier??? Yeah. I think so. Kids have been sent out of class millions of times for many things and now (because of one black racist's article, used to blow off some steam because he has guilt about only sleeping with white woman (i know people who know him personally and say this is true - I mean what's that about? Issues? Think about it.) what teacher can ever send ANY kid out of class without consequence now? And, how can Seattle ever get out of this trap?! Can't you find something REAL to bitch about, writer? I don't even want to give him the credit to utter his name - plus, my gag reflex kicks in. People, the product has a WARNING sign on the label, meaning; DON'T WEAR THIS AROUND SENSITIVE, ALLERGIC PEOPLE. What's-his-name is a dick. (just had to throw that in). OH, and a little personal note - My daughter is mixed, most people do not think she is even partially white. She's 'African American' and 'Caucasian' (said with a sort of snide, polite, kind-o-fake accent) dare I say 'Black and White' in your politically correct world? Shame, shame, shame. Go back to where you belong, writer, and stop causing more problems in an already difficult area. In closing, I'm so happy to be out of there.
More...
Posted by PrincessofPoliticallyCorrect on June 10, 2010 at 11:07 PM · Report this
300
On the lake @296 you are so full of shit, any black beast that’s in jail is in there because he broke the law. Probably for doing more than vandalizing a parking meter. Have you watched the movie Cool hand Luke, I do not recall seeing any black people in that prison. I wonder where they all where if they go to jail for the simple fact of not being white. Your ignorance is only surpassed by your flapping lips.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 10, 2010 at 11:09 PM · Report this
301
B ro @ 294 and 296 that is some interesting propaganda you have there. Maybe you should check out these videos of the unreported crimes that happen in the real world. You may also want to check out the video of Jeremiah Wright. Maybe you should try and get your information from sources other than the liberal controlled media such as ABC, CBS, NBC or CNBC; all they do is promote the elitist liberal agenda which will be the destruction of western civilization.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_qROcVAZow&feature=related or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpHWMLeRI… and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jc2FCJ7zW…
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 10, 2010 at 11:20 PM · Report this
302
"stop causing more problems in an already difficult area" @299

you mean we should stop denouncing injustice?

Posted by on_the_lake on June 10, 2010 at 11:37 PM · Report this
303
Princess of politically correct, I usually dont feed the trolls here but you are

A: pathologically sensitive about race( Charles explained the dynamic in great detail

B: Are sick of your "mixed" daughters hair cair products.

C: Have a "mixed" child.

I say this in all seriousness, and as a "mixed" child myself. If you love your daughter, give her up for adoption instead of having her endure years and years of torture from a passive aggressive bigot.
Posted by Robert Lashley on June 10, 2010 at 11:50 PM · Report this
304
A point I am compelled to make to all of those who have decried insensitivity to the teachers sensitivity and, moreso, to the people who have blatantly accused everyone who's ever worn a perfumed product of being an "asshole":

I *totally* understand MCS. I do not diminish it's severity for those who suffer it.

I also totally get that the MCS-afflicted population is a MINORITY.

It's not fair. MCS'ers, you should totally stomp your feet and shout epithets to your god and the makers of fragrance. But what you SHOULD NOT do is expect the MAJORITY population of non MCS sufferers to bend to YOUR needs. On what planet does the minority get to put restrictions on the majority?

That the students and their parents needed to be sensitive to a pre-delivered declaration and request is obvious. They're trapped in a little room, and all parties should make efforts to make that as productive and painless a situation as possible. But to insist that everyone just use bobby pins and elastics because they have no right to deal with their hair as they see fit is just as flawed as the presumption that a student has the right to wear heavily scented products in an environment where doing so is a known problem.
Posted by FragranceLover on June 11, 2010 at 8:18 AM · Report this
305
White privilege is invisible to whites.

Example: I ride the bus every day and I usually am carrying a piece of toast I can eat on the bus. I have never encountered an issue, and didn't realize there could be one- UNTIL a black woman (another frequent rider) was chastised by the SAME driver who smiled and said hello to me each morning, toast and all. He yelled at her, "No eating on the bus!" She said, "you're a racist motherfucker, aren't you?"

And then he kicked her off.

THAT is an example of white privilege- one that I was absolutely unaware of before this woman was humiliated.
Posted by B-Ro on June 11, 2010 at 11:46 AM · Report this
306
It seems unlikely that anyone could be allergic to the smell of an olive oil product. Olive oil is used in a great many foods, and I've never heard of anyone being allergic to olive oil in foods, whereas we've all heard of people being allergic to mushrooms or peanuts. I think requesting that the teacher provide medical documentation of this bizarre supposed-allergy is not too much to ask. The fact that she hasn't done so seems suspicious since olive oil would be hard to avoid.
Posted by Diagoras on June 11, 2010 at 3:05 PM · Report this
307
I can't believe the initial article so blatantly omitted the fact that they where asked specifically to not let their child wear anything scented to class. Doesn't lend much credence to Mr. Mudede's argument.
Some how I feel knowing this fact the teacher's version of event would be a lot different than Charles'. Pretty poor journalism in my opinion.
Posted by SomethingSmellsFishy on June 11, 2010 at 3:30 PM · Report this
308
Here's a possible way for you to find out if the teacher's actions really were racially motivated:

If the school or district arranges a meeting between the teacher and you and your daughter, have your daughter wash her hair with the most neutral, unscented shampoo and conditioner available, just in preparation for that meeting. Then, at the meeting, claim that your daughter is still using the same product as before and ask the teacher to explain what is so offensive about it. If it's really just the unfamiliar smell of melanin that offends her, this test should make it very obvious.
Posted by DovS on June 11, 2010 at 6:32 PM · Report this
309
I have a caregiver who is from Somalia - some of the hair products are highly fragranced. I have severe asthma and have a violent action to them. "Organic" does not really mean healthy for you or your child. The ingredients in this product include:

Water - Aqua, Coconut Oil - Cocos Nucifera, Sorbitol, Trimonium Methosulfate, Cetearyl Alcohol , Petrolatum, Cyclomethicone, Peanut Oil - Arachi Hypogaea , Castor Oil - Ricinus Communis, Cetyl Esters, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil - Olea Europaea, Stearic Acid, Triethanolamine, DMDM Hydantoin, Propylene Glycol, Methyl Paraben, Propyl Paraben, Carbomer , Cetearyl Alcohol , Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate, PEG-25 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Fragrance - Parfum , Benzyl Alcohol , Benzyl Salicylate , Geraniol, Hexylcinnamicaldehyde, Lillial, D'Limonene, Linalool, Lyral, Alpha Isomethyl Ionone, BHT , Blue No. 1 - CI 42090, Yellow No. 5 - CI 19140

Skin Deep is a good source to check the toxicity of hair products.
http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/product…

Sometimes it isn't racism.
Posted by stillonline on June 11, 2010 at 10:34 PM · Report this
310
I have a caregiver who is from Somalia - some of the hair products are highly fragranced. I have severe asthma and have a violent reaction to them. I mean VIOLENT life threatening asthma attack.

"Organic" does not really mean healthy for you or your child. You have to read the ingredients and it's best to avoid products that include "fragrance" since it usually means ingredients they want to keep secret. CNN is doing a special report on Toxic America. Of the 80,000 chemicals commonly used only 200 have been tested.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/05/31/che…

The ingredients in this product include:

Water - Aqua, Coconut Oil - Cocos Nucifera, Sorbitol, Trimonium Methosulfate, Cetearyl Alcohol , Petrolatum, Cyclomethicone, Peanut Oil - Arachi Hypogaea , Castor Oil - Ricinus Communis, Cetyl Esters, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil - Olea Europaea, Stearic Acid, Triethanolamine, DMDM Hydantoin, Propylene Glycol, Methyl Paraben, Propyl Paraben, Carbomer , Cetearyl Alcohol , Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate, PEG-25 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Fragrance - Parfum , Benzyl Alcohol , Benzyl Salicylate , Geraniol, Hexylcinnamicaldehyde, Lillial, D'Limonene, Linalool, Lyral, Alpha Isomethyl Ionone, BHT , Blue No. 1 - CI 42090, Yellow No. 5 - CI 19140
This is a HIGHLY TOXIC product.

Skin Deep is a good source to check the toxicity of hair products.
http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/product

Sometimes it isn't racism.
Posted by stillonline on June 11, 2010 at 11:00 PM · Report this
311
Holy crap do you come out the clown here, Charles.

Your child's teacher makes a special request of the students to take into account her sensitivities (which, for some reason you don't believe to be real). You react by screaming "racist" and using your position as a minor journalist to make this a public matter.

This will back-fire and I hope, after reading you here, that it does so spectacularly.

You have people of colour in here telling you that even they find themselves sensitive to that product, yet you continue to deny that that's possible and the only possible explanation is racism.

Never noticed you before the barbie thing. Now I find you funny. Keep entertaining us please, especially when you get counter-sued.
Posted by Doot on June 12, 2010 at 3:53 AM · Report this
312
The allergies excuse is ridiculous as the school year has been on for quite sometime and the teacher has been fine all these months.
Posted by clarity on June 12, 2010 at 12:58 PM · Report this
313
Mr.Muede, the incident that happened to your child is one that comes pretty close to what I had to deal with as the only black kid in a predominately (at that time)Caucasian classroom, in the late 1970's(no hair product issues, but I was (by default) the Black culture representative to my teachers and classmates) . Even if the teacher had the reaction to your daughter's hair products(and I really don't like the or use Organic Root Stimulator products because of all the chemical additives),she was extremely inappropriate and humiliated your child in front of her peers. I hope that your daughter gets a public apology from that teacher for her behavior, and maybe she shouldn't be teaching Advanced anything since she isn't that advanced in her character.
Posted by cocobakerchica on June 12, 2010 at 2:44 PM · Report this
314
A couple of things have happened here.
1) Because of the rush to judgement and the failure to present all the facts, I will never again look at anything with this man's name as the author without questioning it's honesty. Hyperbole is not journalism.

2) It's odd that the true racism is ignored. Why is it that the brown and black people always get the smallpox blankets, the lead paint buildings or the toxic products? You can bet your sweet ass that none of that poison is in conditioner for little white girls.

Posted by stillonline on June 12, 2010 at 6:50 PM · Report this
315
B-Ro (#305):
That is not a case of white priveledge or invisible racism. If you're allowed to eat on the bus because you're white, that's overt racism. White priveledge has to do with the fact that white neighborhoods generally have deeper financial roots. What racists like coolhand fail to recognize is the pervasive depressive effects slavery and the "Reconstruction" produced. It was almost 100 years after the Civil War before Jim Crow was outlawed and that wasn't that long ago. The institutionalized effects of racism are real, but I don't think they're at play in this case.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 12, 2010 at 8:00 PM · Report this
316
@116-Unless you are of African descent, you have no idea of the limited availability of hair products that are appropriate for the hair texture that many African-Americans and people of multi-ethnic backgrounds have. This availability decreases drastically when the desired products are to be both organic and scent-free. Furthermore, from Garnier Frutis to Herbal Essence to Aveda to Burt's Bees, the vast majority of the hair products in this country have strong fragances-particularly to those who do not use said product.

@Charles: You should be angry. Educators above all others should know how sensitive young children are, and to throw a child out of a classroom when no misbehavior was invovled is highly inappropriate regardless of race, color, or creed.

However, Charles, I hope you and your wife has taken your little girl to buy some Carol's Daughter or Design Essentials products. They are much better quality products and smell significantly better. My sister and I unfortunately went through something similar as young girls and found these products actually worked better in our hair while having a much more palatable smell.
Posted by Southernbelle2 on June 12, 2010 at 11:24 PM · Report this
317
If this teacher did have some sort of chemical allergy (doubtful, but let's play what if), then what explains her not having any reaction until the end of school and apparently not having any reaction to the multiple products used by other students and school staff members who are not in her class, but attend the school? Does she have this reaction to GArnier Fructis? Peach and strawberry shampoo? Deodorant? Body powder? As a teacher, at THURGOOD MARSHALL school no less, she is swimming in beauty products, and janitorial products on a daily basis and she had to pinpoint this child? No dice. She doesn't deserve the public trust to be influencing children. Maybe she can find a job teaching online where her "sensitivity" isn't allowed to cut the knees out from under innocent impressionable children.
Posted by NSpirit on June 13, 2010 at 8:45 AM · Report this
318
NSpirit:
Why is it "doubtful" the teacher has a chemical allergy? Also, we have reports that there are other factors involved which probably increased her sensitivity.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 13, 2010 at 10:01 AM · Report this
319
I don't have much doubt that the teacher had a severe reaction to *something*. I don't even think it's impossible that it was an ingredient in the hair product. But how on earth could she TELL what she was reacting to? That's the weak link, as far as I am concerned.
Posted by janedeau on June 13, 2010 at 10:40 AM · Report this
320
I am so glad to be done with SPS! Our children are out. We enrolled our daughter at Seattle Girls School because the middle schools in Seattle are atrocious, and she's a thriving college student now. We just gave our son permission to drop out of his ridiculously bad high school, and he's now in college a year early. Both of our kids chose to finish their high school careers at Seattle Central Community College - a stellar institution.

Mr. Mudede, please consider Seattle Girls School for your daughter. It is an amazing place. And they do have scholarships.
Posted by Clematis on June 13, 2010 at 11:09 AM · Report this
321
Yes, Harry Knuckles, there WERE other factors, like embalmed chickens, Febreeze, and I'd imagine, an entire class of kids using scented products at home-IS there any such thing as unscented toothpaste, for example?

The stories I've heard involve the little girl being clearly and obviously singled out as the SOLE cause of this teacher's reaction. I side with poster "janedeau". Unless the teacher went around sniffing each child up close-she COULDN'T know.

And there's the problem. If I were an 8 -year-old put in that position as the sole black child, I'd be pretty upset too. Perception is a mighty powerful thing.
Posted by banana on June 13, 2010 at 11:23 AM · Report this
322
My understanding is that the student shouldn't have been pulled out of class.
I don't know about the other substances, but apparently she wasn't allergic to them. Also, i imagine she was able to tell where it came from through proximity, but I couldn't honestly say for sure.
I know this teacher. She has a detailed history of health issues. For me the charges of racism seem ridiculous considering the context. This is my single point of contention apart from the fact that a bunch of people like to think they have a clue about a person they know next to nothing about; all because a dad rightfully acted protective of his daughter in what I believe was the wrong way to go about it. The only thing his article served, again in my opinion, was to bully a teacher into finishing out her year on sick leave.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 13, 2010 at 2:23 PM · Report this
323
Repeated from the comments thread on http://newlynatural.com/blog/2010/06/lit…

"It’s a complex story, and I get the impression that those involved on all sides ended up doing some things right and some things wrong. I have a problem with people trying to find a definite villain — I think many people would be happy if they could say “This was done by someone who is much dumber and/or more villainous than I am; I could never have contributed to any such situation,” when the reality is most of us probably have, one way or another. We’ve all been too self-centered to understand a different person’s point of view; we’ve all been too angry to take in relevant factual information; we’ve all been culturally and racially insensitive; we’ve all been afraid to communicate openly for fear of being blamed or shamed; we’ve all been ignorant about what it’s like living with a particular disability … I could go on and on."
Posted by janedeau on June 13, 2010 at 5:24 PM · Report this
324
Harry Knuckles @ 315 Once again lets set the record straight, I am NOT A RACIST! I am a REALIST! All you want to do is make excuses for the black beast. They have been given every opportunity and hand out /up that the federal government could come up with, and still they fail miserably. The reason why they are in the shape they are in is their own doing. Instead of ignoring the truth, do some research into how the black race is racist and violent against the white race. I find it unfathomable in many parts of the European Union and North America, you can be arrested , tried, face serious fines and even long prison terms for uttering the word nigger yet there are lyrics like this: We’re having thoughts of overthrowing the government…….the brothers and sisters threw their fists in the air…..it’s open season on you crackers, you know; the morgue will be full of Caucasian John Doe’s …….I make the Riot shit look like a fairy tale…. Oh my god , Allah, have mercy; I’m killing them devils cause they ‘re not worthy to walk the earth with the original black man; they must be forgetting; it’s time for Armageddon , and I won’t rest till they are all dead. An excerpt from Going Bananas: Da Lench Mob, Planet of da Apes, 1994, Priority Records, Thorn EMI; now called The EMI Group, The United Kingdom. Not good enough for you how about a little more, this is an excerpt of some rap music written by some of your favorite rap artists and published by Multinational Billion dollar conglomerates like, Time Warner of the United States. Time Warner is the parent company of America on Line and if you are a member you know the quickest way to get banned is to disparage AOL’s highly protected class of pet niggers. Kill the white people; we gonna make them hurt; kill the white people; but buy my record first; ha, ha, ha; kill the white people. Apache, Apache Ain’t Shit, 1993, Tommy Boy Music, Time Warner U.S.A. One more to see if you get the point, These devils make me sick; I love to fill them full of holes; kill them all in the day time, broad motherfucking daylight; 12 o’clock, grab the glock; why wait for night. Sweating Bullets; Brand Nubian, Everything is Everything, 1994, Elektra Entertainment, Warner Communications, Time Warner, U.S.A. There are many more examples, check it out on your own. Any white man, who was to write such lyrics about overthrowing the government and killing black people, would be under investigation by authorities and brought in for questioning, if not charged and imprisoned. What happens to the black rapper, a multimillion dollar contract and fame. Wake Up!!
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Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 13, 2010 at 6:17 PM · Report this
325
Luke, you're a racist because you say black people are inferior. Your bias is based on race: that's the definition of racism. Saying you're a realist is a clever tag-line, but you're still a racist by definition.
The only thing I've heard you say that has any validity I am aware of is the standardized test scores of African Americans is on average lower than whites. That is not proof of a lack of ability, only of where the money tends to be and how the community values Formal Education. When you don't expect the education system to help you, you won't try as hard to do well in that system. This is the kind of thing which came about from the racism which was and still is so abundant in this otherwise great country.
There are plenty of people who fall into the victim mentality.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 13, 2010 at 7:52 PM · Report this
ex-neocon poly wife 326
Regardless of the racial issue--which, I believe you have a very strong case for, this was VERY unprofessional behavior for a teacher! You do not simply remove a child from a class because they have something that smells noxious to you, personally. Children have all kinds of odors. I have had children rip "the big one" in class, use perfumed products when they shouldn't have, kids eat different kinds of foods, forget to bathe, etc., and you don't send the kid out of the room for that stuff--unless they've done something directly against school policy!

Teachers are expected, as professionals, to manage their illnesses and discomforts in PROFESSIONAL ways. Teachers often have to go to school ill--because they have children they are responsible for. Teachers can have allergic reactions, migraines, car accidents, sudden family emergencies, you name it, and STILL have to handle these things professionally. This teacher violated that professionalism--and did it in such an irresponsible way that there is no reason these parents should NOT be up in arms. Anyone who thinks differently does NOT know the profession. The Seattle School District isn't responding--because they are obviously doing everything they can to cover their asses. Period. End of story. Kudos to dad. You two have a case and a responsibility to social justice. Keep fighting. We need more racially diverse students in advanced courses and they all need to know that when they get there they will be treated with dignity.
Posted by ex-neocon poly wife http://aphroditesdreams.blogspot.com/ on June 13, 2010 at 8:41 PM · Report this
327
Harry Knuckles @235 I ‘am sorry to inform you that it is not a tag line it is the truth, the truth will set you free but at first it hurts. I regret that you do not seem to be willing to do any research on the intelligence issue; you say it’s a matter of money because they are under privileged, yeah ok. I do believe from all evidence considered from all sources, such as Africa the place of origin for the black people in America, that civilization has not evolved any in thousands of years except where influenced by Europeans; they are inferior in almost every aspect of life and civilization. You refuse to open your eyes because of the collective guilt that has been misplaced on the white people by blacks and other liberal whites. Your action only enables them and emboldens them to ask for more undeserved handouts. I also have noticed that you do not comment on the black hatred towards the Whiteman in the rap music and the unreported hate crimes against the white man committed by the blacks, and if you bother to do the math you will see that on a per capita basis that the black on white crimes significantly outnumber the white on black crimes. I ‘am sorry to say that you have been successfully brain washed by the liberal controlled media, and until it happens to you, and it will, you will be set in your misguided ways. However when you discover the truth, I would be glad to welcome you to our growing brotherhood with love and friendship. In conclusion, I do have a certain amount of respect for you as you have refrained for the most part in calling names and You try to make valid points, however you are unwilling to look at any other points or evidence that supports the fact that the black race is inferior and are far more violent with the white man and themselves, rape, theft, and murder are crimes not culture. I think because in your mind that if you acknowledge the truth then you will have to label yourself as a racist, because anything else is a tag. I digress I do have a certain amount of respect for you but unfortunately we are going to have to agree to disagree on this matter.
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Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 13, 2010 at 8:52 PM · Report this
328
Let me provide you with some education about a condition known as Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. This is NOT about racism. This is about a teacher who suffers from a condition known as chemical sensitivity as do at least 6% of the public according to research studies that have been done since 1993. It is about a product that contains ingredients that make her ill - not about a child. The teacher would have done the same thing regardless of the ethnicity of the child.

This product is NOT "organic" as advertised. That is just marketing hype. The label shows it has the following ingredients: Aqua (Water) , Cocos Nucifera Oil (Coconut) , Sorbitol , Petrolatum , Cyclopentasiloxane , Carthamus Tinctorius Seed Oil (Safflower) , Ricinus Communis Seed Oil (Castor) , Cetyl Esters , Cetearyl Alcohol , Sodium Cetearyl Sulfate , Stearic Acid , Olea Europaea Fruit Oil (Olive) , PPG-3 Benzyl Ether Myristate , Dimethicone , Glyceryl Glycol , Triethanolamine , Carbomer , Disodium EDTA , BHT , Fragrance , Benzyl Alcohol , Benzyl Salicylate , Geraniol , Hexyl Cinnamal , Lilial , D-Limonene , Linalool , Lyral Methyl Ionone , CI 42090 (Blue #1) , CI 19140 (Yellow #5).

Following are the principle chemicals found in scented products and their affect on humans:

ACETONE (in: cologne, dishwashing liquid and detergent, nail enamel remover) - On EPA, RCRA, CERCLA Hazardous Waste lists. "Inhalation can cause dryness of the mouth and throat; dizziness, nausea, incoordination, slurred speech, drowsiness, and, in severe exposures, coma." "Acts primarily as a central nervous system (CNS) depressant."

BENZALDEHYDE (in: perfume, cologne, hairspray, laundry bleach, deodorants, detergent, Vaseline lotion, shaving cream, shampoo, bar soap, dishwasher detergent) - Narcotic. Sensitizer. "Local anesthetic, CNS depressant"... "irritation to the mouth, throat, eyes, skin, lungs, and GI tract causing nausea and abdominal pain." "May cause kidney damage." "Do not use with contact lenses."

BENZYL ACETATE (in: perfume, cologne, shampoo, fabric softener, stickup air freshener, dishwashing liquid and detergent, soap, hairspray, bleach, after shave, deodorants) - Carcinogenic (linked to pancreatic cancer); "From vapors: irritating to eyes and respiratory passages, exciting cough." "In mice: hyperaemia of the lungs." "Can be absorbed through the skin causing systemic effects." "Do not flush to sewer."

BENZYL ALCOHOL (in: perfume, cologne, soap, shampoo, nail enamel remover, air freshener, laundry bleach and detergent, Vaseline lotion, deodorants, fabric softener) - "irritating to the upper respiratory tract" ... "headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, drop in blood pressure, CNS depression, and death in severe cases due to respiratory failure."

CAMPHOR (in: perfume, shaving cream, nail enamel, fabric softener, dishwasher detergent, nail color, stickup air freshener) -"local irritant and CNS stimulant" ..."readily absorbed through body tissues" ..."irritation of eyes, nose and throat" ..."dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles and convulsions" "Avoid inhalation of vapors."

ETHANOL (in: perfume, hairspray, shampoo, fabric softener, dishwashing liquid and detergent, laundry detergent, shaving cream, soap, Vaseline lotion, air fresheners, nail color and remover, paint and varnish remover)-On EPA Hazardous Waste list; symptoms: "...fatigue; irritating to eyes and upper respiratory tract even in low concentrations..." "Inhalation of ethanol vapors can have effects similar to those characteristic of ingestion. These include an initial stimulatory effect followed by drowsiness, impaired vision, ataxia, stupor..." Causes CNS disorder.

ETHYL ACETATE (in: after shave, cologne, perfume, shampoo, nail color, nail enamel remover, fabric softener, dishwashing liquid) -Narcotic. On EPA Hazardous Waste list; "...irritating to the eyes and respiratory tract" ..."may cause headache and narcosis (stupor)" ..."defatting effect on skin and may cause drying and cracking" ..."may cause anemia with leukocytosis and damage to liver and kidneys" "Wash thoroughly after handling."

LIMONENE (in: perfume, cologne, disinfectant spray, bar soap, shaving cream, deodorants, nail color and remover, fabric softener, dishwashing liquid, air fresheners, after shave, bleach, paint and varnish remover) - Carcinogenic. "Prevent its contact with skin or eyes because it is an irritant and sensitizer." "Always wash thoroughly after using this material and before eating, drinking, ...applying cosmetics. Do not inhale limonene vapor."

LINALOOL (in: perfume, cologne, bar soap, shampoo, hand lotion, nail enamel remover, hairspray, laundry detergent, dishwashing liquid, Vaseline lotion, air fresheners, bleach powder, fabric softener, shaving cream, after shave, solid deodorant) - Narcotic . ..."respiratory disturbances" ... "Attracts bees." "In animal tests: ataxic gait, reduced spontaneous motor activity and depression ... development of respiratory disturbances leading to death." ..."depressed frog-heart activity." Causes CNS disorder.

METHYLENE CHLORIDE (in: shampoo, cologne, paint and varnish remover) -Banned by the FDA in 1988! No enforcement possible due to trade secret laws protecting chemical fragrance industry. On EPA, RCRA, CERCLA Hazardous Waste lists. "Carcinogenic" ... "Absorbed, stored in body fat, it metabolizes to carbon monoxide, reducing oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood." "Headache, giddiness, stupor, irritability, fatigue, tingling in the limbs." Causes CNS disorder.

a-PINENE (in: bar and liquid soap, cologne, perfume, shaving cream, deodorants, dishwashing liquid, air freshener) - Sensitizer (damaging to the immune system).

g-TERPINENE (in: cologne, perfume, soap, shaving cream, deodorant, air freshener) - "Causes asthma and CNS disorders."

a-TERPINEOL (in: perfume, cologne, laundry detergent, bleach powder, laundry bleach, fabric softener, stickup air freshener, vaseline lotion, cologne, soap, hairspray, after shave, roll-on deodorant) - ..."highly irritating to mucous membranes"... "Aspiration into the lungs can produce pneumonitis or even fatal edema." Can also cause "excitement, ataxia (loss of muscular coordination), hypothermia, CNS and respiratory depression, and headache." "Prevent repeated or prolonged skin contact."

I ask you what responsible parent would expose their 8-year-old child to these things many of which are on the hazardous waste list? This little girl who is just developing an immune system and ability to cope with the environmental toxins is accumulating toxins through her skin - her scalp, the part of her skin that sits closest to her developing brain.

So before you condemn this teacher who is just desperately trying to hold onto her job while trying to avoid the fumes of products used by people, please try to understand that in doing so she may be saving your child, you and many others from the same fate she suffers.

It is hard enough living with this disability without having to constantly trying to prove to others that you are indeed having a reaction that leaves you unable to function. I know because I have lived with this for 22 years and have been forced out of the workplace onto disability because others who feel they have the right to spew fumes of toxic chemicals called "fragrance" everywhere they go.

So empathy and understanding is what this teacher needs - not attacks from people who are uneducated about a disability that 6% of the population suffer from. It could be you one day who is in the situation, so live by the golden rule - you know what that is.

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Posted by BettyJK on June 14, 2010 at 11:17 AM · Report this
329
I was a teacher with Chemical Intolerance (aka MCS), too. It is a complex issue to explain to others who seem to be able to efficiently detoxify synthetics. I evetually had to leave teaching because I could not tolerate the pesticides being used in and around the buildings. There is much ignorance on this issue here. After reading most of the posts here (and particularly from parents of children of parents in the class), I do NOT believe this is a race issue. Chemically sensitivity people are a minority, too. It seems the best remediation for ignorance is education. We all have much yet to learn. The wise keep their minds open. There is great wisdom in diversity and it seems some writers here have yet to learn of that lesson.
Posted by Don on June 14, 2010 at 5:06 PM · Report this
330
Seattle learnt nothing from Lord Maurice Clemmons
http://www.scribd.com/doc/24094269/Marty…
Posted by National Whistleblower on June 14, 2010 at 7:24 PM · Report this
331
Charles Mudede is, without a doubt, the Strangers worst writer. Is it so hard to fathom that maybe your daughter's hair actually smelled bad? This is the type of extreme reactionary rhetoric that is eroding the credibility of well-intentioned activists such as Sharpton and Shapiro. NOT EVERY ISSUE IS A RACE ISSUE! Just because your daughter has darker skin does not mean that this is a race issue. Mountains out of mole hills.
Posted by TonyShoelaces on June 15, 2010 at 6:27 AM · Report this
332
I see some really dumb comments on this blog, such as "stay away from people", "go find a job in the woods", Or "I wouldn't get a job in a pound if I was allergic to dogs and cats." That's like saying if you have to be in a wheel chair stay home. Don't both us with your need of ramps, elevators, and doors that open automatically for you - just stay home because you are just too much bother for us. Oh, and then there is "just manage your allergies in a professional way." This is not about not liking certain smells. This is not about simple allergies. This is about ingesting chemicals that are dangerous and when they hit your brain they affect your brain and body in ways you cannot imagine if you aren't chemically sensitive. It isn't as simple as saying "don't use it," or "stay away from it" because just like second-hand smoke, you are a user even if you don't use it because these things are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) specifically designed to continually out-gas (spew) their chemicals into the air around you. And they are pervasive in our society that is of the belief that everything from their hair to their carpet must smell of something. Here is a link about Petroleum Products in Perfume - that includes anything that has "fragrance" listed as an ingredient. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stacy-malk…
Posted by BettyJK on June 15, 2010 at 8:02 AM · Report this
333
I think you've done your daughter an incredibly thoughtless disservice. How does she know this is based on race? Because of the way you've raised her? You're implying that the teacher was not made ill by the product in the girl's hair. So her motive MUST be racial.
You don't give enough facts here for us to make an educated judgement. But there are people out there who are very sensitive to chemicals and are made miserable when exposed to them. That a teacher would fake this just to ostracize a little girl is just not believable. More facts, please.
Posted by ggg on June 15, 2010 at 10:46 AM · Report this
334
Luke @327: Yes, probably going to have to agree to disagree (Amen for the 1st amendment eh?). It seems clear to me; I could give a fuck about what most people think when it comes to what I believe so your reasoning seems flawed to me on almost every level.
Geneticists argue over whether race even exists because of what they've found through the physical sciences. I'm sorry, but you're using anectdotal evidence to argue against science: science wins, never mind my personal observations fit more with the non-racist view of race dynamics. And if you really want to use standardized tests as the measure, don't forget to bow down to the Asian population for their superiority. Last I saw they were, on average, better than white scores.
Anyhow, there ya go.
May good always prevail.
Posted by Harry Knuckles on June 15, 2010 at 1:01 PM · Report this
335
First, while obtaining my Masters in a health field and having a background in biochemistry (mother was in medicine so I grew up reading medical texts from a young age) (and more, chemistry of arts so on) I ended up with chemical injury after a building fire and renovations were not done according to various laws/codes (such as exhaust fans). This did not happen overnight but slowly I lost my health and more and more could not be around (now all) man made synthetic products and some natural (all plants have toxins in them our livers have evolved to eliminate them IF healthy)

The various mechanisms involved are extremely complicated, but involve the brain, liver, kidneys, immune system and really all organs. The brain is greatly damaged (think dish soap that dissolves dish grease - your brain is mostly forms of fat and these products are based on toxic petroleum products and damage your brain and nerve endings (and more).

Neurogenic inflammation - that's when the brain swells upon minute exposures and passing out, vomiting so on incur. In extreme nadir situations, seizures and even light and radiation must be avoided (where I ended up).

These same products (floor strippers, finishers, two part bath epoxy, paints and more) that caused me to end up with multi organ failure, internal bleeding, brain damage and basically vegetative for decades before holistic therapies created improvement to where I can function better, are the same classes of chemicals found in most all common household products. (fabric softeners, "fragrances" plug ins, soaps, deodorizers and on and on) ALL ARE EXTREMELY TOXIC.

Most people are actually in stage one - where you may not notice (ever feel "dizzy" around "perfumes" - banned in France btw only natural oils allowed in that country) That is your brain cells dying and reacting...

When I am around the classes of chemicals I am now sensitized to (any chemical can cause sensitization some cause anesthetization most fit both classes. This is an actual natural phenomenon of the body's physiology. This is why I ended up "paralyzed" and yes they are the same classes of chemicals doctors use when putting you under for surgery. Do you really want to wear these on a daily basis - remember we all started out where "they didn't bother us" (they were silently doing their damage however).

Hundreds of thousands here in America are living homeless, in cars, tents with no income (or very little).. up to 40% die and others commit suicide, both from pain of organ failure and sheer isolation often for decades!

This teacher represents a person who is visible and valiantly trying to hang on (as we all did)... most are "invisible" to society and living miserable lives due to this same ignorance of education, jump to conclusions and misunderstanding.

But because it is increasing each year world wide more and more will end up with this or another related to your ongoing exposures.

Even with a doctor's medical letter (by law) many companies would not provide the msds (material safety data sheet) that would allow me to find out chemical ingredients not listed on the label but under the title of "fragrance" up to 5k "ingredients" and more often in each group (all made from left over oil sludge the companies do not wish to dispose of properly).

On the way "down" I read OSHA publications on trade names, and other chemistry books - amazing any of these products are allowed on the market but yes, these companies are in bed with Congress. (minor in City Government and statistics)

(and all btw tested in the eyes of rabbits with throats cut out so no one can hear them scream, or down the throats of dogs, draize eye rabbit and 50/50 - my research paper for my psychology degree... do you really want to support a billion dollar "business" that tortures those "outside our realm of consideration" because YOU want to wear a highly damaging toxic product? (all have been tested zillions of times prior - the equipment and other grants are funded by the companies that make these toxic products and institutions do not wish to loose these vast sums - often taxpayers, of money so it keeps going) and skin graft and computer models can now be used).

This paradigm will eventually end in disaster as it already is - no cure for "cancer" MS or many other man made ills created by these products and horrible food sources (another topic)

It is time for each of us to examine our use (well with MCS not an issue any longer) of these toxic products that are dumped down the toilet into our oceans, into our air, and on our person and create a nightmare for innocent animals that someone decided will provide "safety" for us.... I would never use a product that causes such pain that the rabbits in their attempt to escape their neck braces often break their necks.

Maybe dear father - you can educate yourself and then eliminate these products for your daughter - telling her and teaching her something of REAL value. I doubt she felt singled out until you taught her that. (and welcome to the real world - as a kid I was bullied and my gay brother (twin was beaten half to death almost every day he existed)

You can tell her it had NOTHING to do with her, but that her teacher was "allergic" to something she was wearing on her person. A big difference don't you think.

Now, like many with chemical injury (MCS is much misleading) I live in a bubble and after years of bed with horrific symptoms go out twice a week midday if able.

That is to a local "fellowship" of people mostly from Africa (yes Africa not African Americans) and after I explained to them that the "perfume" and hair care products made it so I had to sit far away (and not join in the group prayer so on) while they do not really understand the science they would NEVER think of me - the only Finnish American as a racist!

This degradation of multi organs which causes life threatening reactions (and unfortunately this teacher will probably get sicker and sicker as most do until she is completely disabled because of the lack of understanding - the pharmaceuticals make most of these toxic products and are targeting people who have gotten sick by them - think Bayer Aspirin Bayer Pesticides and then do some real research).

Not all disabilities are obvious... this teacher was trying to hang on to life as she knows it - as an abyss most of you do not realize is as bad as cancer, brain tumors or any other life threatening disease is.

Been there done that - it is a horrific condition to have and more horrific in that people have put cigarettes out in my face, told me I was horrible for needing to sit in the disability section of Amtrak (supposed to be protected by laws) and a Canadian woman wanted it for her children (whispering into my ear how horrible a person I was).

This teacher is brave - the father is the real racist (sees it everywhere he goes - look in the mirror) and maybe he will do some real soul searching and read up on this condition and how it impacts her life (teacher) and his child's.

These chemicals bio accumulate by the way - it never goes away and there is no cure. Poisons poison - either one major impact or slowly over time which is worse as the body can not recover and all must be avoided.

MCSers are canaries in our modern world's cave - beware what you label it - it is not racism.

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Posted by bettaboy on June 15, 2010 at 1:02 PM · Report this
336
Harry Knuckles @ 334 Yes you are right science does prevail over ideas, maybe you should check out this site. http://www.news-medical.net/news/2005/04… , and get back to me about your geneticist. Yes you are correct about the Asian test results; I have never stated their lack of intelligence. I also have never said anything about anybody bowing down to another, I have said we need to live separate in our own communities for the safety of all. Multiculturalism is a hoax, which has been imposed on western civilization by the liberal elitists. Multiculturalism drags the western civilization down to the lowest common denominator, because it is far easier to pull down a great society than it is to raise the third world up to our expectations. I also agree good will always prevail, so will the truth. I am confident that when the people wake up to the lies they have been told by their government and the liberal controlled media there will be a revolution the likes they have not been seen since the American Revolution. I sincerely wish the best for you and hope that you will awake from the lies before it is too late, I feel that you are a good man that is doing what he believes is right, I can respect that.
Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 15, 2010 at 3:48 PM · Report this
337
This hair product was not Afro Sheen, so nothing racist about it. If a white girl wore this stuff to the class, the teacher would have complained the same way.
Posted by Honkey on June 15, 2010 at 6:07 PM · Report this
338
thurgood marshall is widely regarded as the least intelligent supreme court justice in the history of the court, and the prototype for afro action tokenism
Posted by nelson mandela on June 16, 2010 at 1:40 PM · Report this
339
Mr.Mudede, I have a simple solution to your hygiene problems, one you should seriously consider because you and your daughter will encounter similar episodes for the rest of your lives: Move to africa! living among your own people will make your life so much better, you share the same culture, habits, foods, so any odors emanating from your daughter will be celebrated instead of ridiculed. please take your wife too!
Posted by nelson mandela on June 16, 2010 at 2:21 PM · Report this
340
I suspect Mr. Mudede is a negro in search of a payday, and salad oil and a child will be his ticket. It has become easier for negroes in america to game the system than to actually work, which explains why africa is home to the lowest standard of living among all of the worlds 180 countries. they hone their craft in africa, working the e-mail scam, the food aid ripoffs, when they get good enough the make their way to america and set up shop. Hopefully the School district will see through this fraud and call mr mudede's bluff and not offer any kind of settlement.
Posted by nelson mandela on June 16, 2010 at 2:30 PM · Report this
342
A recent survey determined that the ave IQ for a sub-saharan african (negroid) was only 67.
Posted by nelson mandela on June 16, 2010 at 4:24 PM · Report this
Rev.Smith 343
@340:

180 countries? what decade are you living in???
Posted by Rev.Smith on June 17, 2010 at 2:04 AM · Report this
344
Even if this wasn't racially motivated, it was handled very poorly. And, echoing the sentiment of many above, someone who suffers fainting spells as a result of being in the same room with a person who has shampooed or conditioned their hair should not be working with the public.
Posted by Amanda on June 17, 2010 at 2:16 AM · Report this
345
Even if this wasn't racially motivated, it was handled very poorly. And, echoing the sentiment of many above, someone who suffers fainting spells as a result of being in the same room with a person who has shampooed or conditioned their hair should not be working with the public.
Posted by Amanda on June 17, 2010 at 2:16 AM · Report this
Rev.Smith 346
@336: those liberal elitists who first thought multiculturalism might be a noble ideal were named adams, jefferson, hamilton, franklin, et al - they fought for liberty for liberty's sake. You might recall something about 'all men created equal'...? The american revolution was a fight to GET that "liberal, elite" idealism and make it law (though I think back then liberal elitism was actually called 'educated enlightenment').

...
that historic western civilation you allude to, and the lowest common denominator: sounds a lot like keywords in the definition of
democracy where even back to the ancient greeks the lowliest stable shoveler got to vote on the same candidates the rich politician got to vote on. Likewise, the US allows anyone deemed old enough to vote as they want... third class ticket holder or not.
Your POV only makes sense if it were given from a redcoat monarch loyalist, not a modern bill-of-rights-defending american.
In any case, Here's a toast to the freedom of speech & press, friend. CHEERS
Posted by Rev.Smith on June 17, 2010 at 2:20 AM · Report this
347
Mr. Mudede, I'm sure your daughter's hair texture, while curly, is closer to American standards than my daughter's kinky hair from two black parents. I thought about what I would do if I was in your wife's situation and I would have handled it differently. Since education, not race, is a priority in my household, my daughter would have worn her hair in cornrows the entire year, rather than risk my daughter being singled out for being anything other than special. I would have been able to alter her hairstyle because as her mother I know how to manage her hair because it is like my own.

I do not respect most racism claims from blacks in interracial marriages, especially blacks who make their living off racism claims, black studies (academics) black art (Kara Walker), etc. I, in no way imply that love was not a motivating factor in your union with your wife, but I would like people to admit to the upgrade aspect of marrying white. Though it is not true whites are less likely to have poor credit, criminal history or more likely to raise better children, it is certainly perceived that way in society and so technically you married into the very white privilege you get paid to enviscerate. This is an issue to you because you get paid to be a persecuted black man, but your daughter does not have to be weighed down with the burden of being black when she is not. The real issue is that you married a white woman who can't do her daughter's hair properly and all of this could have been avoided if you took your daughter to a salon in the black part of town to get her hair braided.

Please stop trying to turn your daughter into Rosa Parks.
Posted by jennifa0jenny on June 17, 2010 at 2:49 AM · Report this
348
Well spoken, JennifaOjenny!
Posted by CityGal on June 17, 2010 at 11:58 AM · Report this
349
Rev Smith @ 346; That’s quite the revisionist history you have there, you say that Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton, and Franklin were the original multiculturalists’, Excuse me? maybe you can enlighten me to all the non- European Peoples that emigrated to colonial United States of their own free will. Yes you are right all men are created equal, however the black race is not human, they are subhuman, according to D.N.A evidence on intelligence, and the fact that in Sub-Sahara Africa the civilization has not changed in hundreds of years, and the average IQ is 67, and if I remember correctly that around the mental retardation level. The American Revolution was fought to fight oppression from the Crown, and to get representation in the English Parliament, at the time taxation without representation was considered very oppressive, thus the Revolutionary War. Your right about the origins of Democracy, however you had to be a citizen to vote and a lowly stable boy would not have been a citizen, more likely a slave. Besides I was under the impression that the United States of America was a Republic not a Democracy. You are also sadly mistaken about my view point; I see tax payer’s money given out at nausea to minorities, along with affirmative action, the lowering of standards at schools, universities, and jobs. To help the minorities, so they can compete with humans, thus the comment of minorities drags us down You are 100% Right freedom of speech is essential to freedom, and Justice, but as far as freedom of the press is concerned, what freedom of the press, have you watched any mass media lately or read a national news paper, they all sing the same song in Unisom, no dissenting voice anywhere. I have yet to see any reporting on the black on white violence that happens more that white on black crime. The Department of Justice statistics 2005 there is 50% more black on white crime than white on black crime, but why do we never hear about that. How about reporting on the hate that is preached towards the white man and the U.S.A. in black churches, or how about the violent racist kill whitey that is portrayed in rap music, I have many examples, but for space I will give you a short example, kill the white people; we gonna make them hurt; kill the white people; but buy my record first; ha, ha, ha; kill d’ White People. Apache, Apache Ain’t Shit, 1993, Tommy Boy Music, Time Warner, U.S.A.
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Posted by coolhandluke46 on June 17, 2010 at 9:12 PM · Report this
350
"... a dog's hair gives the teacher FEWER problems than my daughter's human but curly hair" is the correct usage! Sheesh.

Posted by MoBettaGrammar on June 18, 2010 at 8:25 AM · Report this
351
"... a dog's hair gives the teacher FEWER problems than my daughter's human but curly hair" is the correct usage! Sheesh. That teacher better focus on teaching child and parent correct grammar instead of whining about the girl's hair.
Posted by MoBettaGrammar on June 18, 2010 at 8:29 AM · Report this
352
and the super ugly move back to Africa, uppity black people remarks make me sick to my stomach and convince him he's right. This was a poor judgement by the teacher issue (call the parent immediately if you remove the child). I don't think it was racially motivated, and the response by the parents was way over the top, but I do think a lot of stuff of this comment blog is sad and ignorant.
Posted by tired on June 18, 2010 at 12:22 PM · Report this
353
As a teacher, white, with extremely curly hair... I see a few sides of this issue.
Personally, I would never, ever, dream of kicking a kid out- even if it was killing me, allergy-wise. And I do have some sensitivity at times to smells. Thankfully, I haven't had a kid send me over the edge, yet. I'd have someone cover my room, and load up on some allergy meds.
That is how I would handle it. It is semi-reasonable to request a reduction in fragrances in a room, if I had a serious issue with allergies... and asking, in person, that if a particular hair product is causing a reaction, kindly requesting a switch to another might be reasonable (and I personally, would have offered to cover some cost of getting a different product, just to demonstrate an understanding of the inconvenience of the whole thing)
At the same time, it is difficult to find good products for curly hair/ethnic hair. In general. In particular in the Pacific Northwest from when I lived there. But in general. It is more expensive, harder to find, and can have a variety of products in it that you may not want in your hair/on your body. For most white people, they can't fathom not going to any store and finding the product they need. So it is not culturally sensitive to expect all students to be able to comply with a fragrance-free zone. That should have been something dealt with a class switch early in the year.

Saying go all-natural doesn't always work, either... because there is still such a stigma associated with curly, big hair. Socially, big, poofy hair, may well lead to harassment, bullying, or teasing. Great for any child to have to go through. (Especially when it is a part of who you are, and in fact, beautiful!)

The other issue being, making sure that when dealing with potential cultural insensitivity, to first educate and inform, stay cool and level headed, and avoid public or private outcries of racism until all the facts are collected and organized and analyzed. Why? Because it closes doors and minds. You, may get labeled as the family that "pulls the race card" whenever there is an issue, your child may turn to believe that the odds are stacked against her early in life, and respond accordingly, vs. striving for her best, and when things get turned into a stand off, everyone loses.

Wouldn't it be wrong to cost a teacher her career if she really did have a legitimate severe allergy to the product your child was using? Wouldn't it be wrong to further humiliate your daughter by making her the center of a media frenzy over hair product? She's 8- you all picked the product, but she's facing unknown repercussions for it- and it sounds like you all knew about the allergy thing, and repeatedly sent her with the product even after the fact. She pays a price for a political stand against injustices real or perceived.
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Posted by Blah De Blah on June 18, 2010 at 1:40 PM · Report this
354
The only 'racism' in this article is purely, wholly, fully on the part of the writer.

A stink is a stink. Many public and private facilities are designated as scent-free (let alone stink-free) zones. To hide behind the race card is despicable enough, but to stick your innocent daughter as the vehicle for your apparent racism for her teacher is just vile.

It is pointless to judge the smell of a product by simply sniffing it within the bottle. Perfumed scents respond differently when placed on human hair or skin.

Apologize to the teacher immediately and wash your daughter's hair properly - or risk having your daughter seized by government authorities and placed in a proper, respectful adoptive home.
Posted by Truth B Known on June 18, 2010 at 4:41 PM · Report this
355
What machew and Blah De Blah said.
Posted by wintersmith on June 19, 2010 at 7:27 AM · Report this
356
I'd have to know a few more details before I could make a judgement call on this one.

1. Does this teacher have any kind of history of covert or overt racism towards the children in her class?

2. Has she had issues with smells with other kids in the past? I sat next to a girl on the bus on the way to school as a kid and I don't know WHAT she put in her hair, but it was nauseating. I almost got sick.

3. (Similar to question 1) Has she ever acted differently to his daughter in particular vs. the other children?

I'm not saying that she should have singled the child out; sending her out of the room was inappropriate because it is shaming to a child to be singled out in such a way. However, jumping to the conclusion that it was out and out racism is not something that should be done as a knee jerk reaction. I was a nanny for an African American family and the mother was incensed that when we took her daughter to the ER that the dr. asked for a "high-five". She felt that he was only doing that because her daughter was black and when I pointed out that I can remember doing that all the time as a kid in a white neighborhood; that that action had assimilated into white culture, she was disbelieving at first. So it is easy to jump to that conclusion.... and no wonder. It's always easy to talk about fairness and equality and how one believes that minorities are using the race card whenever something happens when you're the race essentially with all the power. Not having grown up with people looking at me differently or having my parents or antecedents being treated with disdain and cruelty, I could easily be shrugging this off as just someone with a chip on their shoulder. So I don't want to do that. I do feel, however, that knowing what was going on on both sides is the only way to make a fair assessment of what really happened. If it turns out that she truly was sickened by the smell, then she should at least be taught to show more sensitivity to a child who should never be singled out like that. Also, if she had a real issue she could have easily asked the parents about any products OR put up a general notice to ALL parents informing them that she was allergic to perfumes, she can't go into Bath and Body Works, etc. Another note: You can be allergic to smells and not dog hair at the same time.

I hope I managed to convey what I am trying to articulate without coming across as racially insensitive. If the teacher turns out to have singled out this child due to race, then proper action should be taken. I also don't want this woman to be disciplined or lose her job because of a reaction to a product merely because it would be used on African American hair vs. Caucasian hair. She would then be stuck in the untenable position of not being able to say anything about the subject and have to deal with her reaction to the product because she would be accused of racism for bringing it up - That's why I think a general notice to ALL parents about her allergy to perfumes would have been the best course of action.
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Posted by happy time on June 20, 2010 at 11:36 AM · Report this
357
And I always thought that Mudede was simply a pseudonym behind which the incredibly stupid editors of the Stranger hid their worst efforts.
Posted by Bobito on June 20, 2010 at 11:41 PM · Report this
358
I continue to be astonished by the general stupidity reflected in the comments on this story.

Of course the comments about race and intelligence are stupid and ill-informed, but we must presume that they are intended to incite anger and it is difficult to believe that they represent anyone's actual understanding.

Then there are those who write things like this:
"this was VERY unprofessional behavior for a teacher!" @326. This person wasn't there and has absolutely no idea what the teacher's behavior was like, yet doesn't hesitate to have an opinion about it. What's that about? They have read to much into this and are allowing their imagination to get the better of them. The inability to discern between fantasy and reality in these people is deeply disturbing.

There are those who persist in believing that the teacher's problem was with a smell rather than a chemical. They have read too little about this and reflects a sort of willful ignorance that is beneath contempt.

Finally, there are those who think that someone with allergies should not take a job as a teacher. These folks clearly didn't note that the vast majority of the time the allergies do not pose this sort of problem. And really, if Mr. Mudede's family would just not use this hair product it would not be a problem this time.

There are only three real issues here and no one seems interested in addressing them:

1) When and how should the parents have been contacted about the events of the first day and when and how should the parents have been contacted about the events of the second day. And when and how were the parents contacted. Mr. Mudede has been vague about this point.

2) Were the teachers (there were two involved) mindful of the girl's feelings when the girl was temporarily moved to the other classroom? They are responsible for their words and actions, not for the girl's reaction to the decision. We don't know what the teachers' words and actions were like. Mr. Mudede has been silent about this point.

3) Does an allergic reaction to a chemical in a cosmetic constitute cultural insensitivity? I think all thinking people can agree that it does not, but this is Mr. Mudede's charge. He regards the teacher's allergic reaction to a chemical in the hair product as indisputable evidence of the most literal insensitivity to his - and his daughter's - culture. She literally could not tolerate the chemical, the chemical is in a product intended for use by people with African hair, therefore she can't tolerate Africans. This line of reasoning is absurd and does not stand up under any kind of examination. Mr. Mudede's response to this critique of his reasoning was "Fuck You". Well, it is hard to argue with that.

In short, unless you were there - and Mr. Mudede wasn't - or you want to ponder the real issues listed above - and Mr. Mudede certainly doesn't - you really don't have much to add to this discussion.
More...
Posted by Charlie Mas on June 21, 2010 at 12:55 PM · Report this
359
@ jennifaOjenny@citygal:
You ignorant, separatist heffers! Thank God you don't speak for black women in general. I have two black parents, and I married a black man (could have easily fallen in love with a white man also, but I didn't) we have two children. My momma was from the school of relaxers. I didn't grow up braiding my hair, and didn't know what I was doing when I had my daughter. My "white" friend, who happened to fall in love with and marry a black man, had 4 beautiful children. She had the audacity to believe that if she was going to take care of their hair properly, she should learn how. She studied, and practiced, not because she didn't want to take them to "black salons", but because she thought that as their mother, she would be more then capable of learning. And she did. She braids protective styles better then the majority of my "black" friends. She taught ME how to take care of my BLACK children's hair. If you want to stay in your carefully built box of walls, skin color and crackerjack judgements about the real reason two human beings fall in love and get married, (no pun intended) do so, but keep "black women" as a rule out of it. No where did it say that this woman did not care for her daughters hair properly. The product in question is WIDELY used in the black community, and I'm sure she's just as concerned with her daughters education as you are, you insufferable bitches.
Posted by Chanell on June 21, 2010 at 7:14 PM · Report this
echizen_kurage 360
@ Happy Time:

That's why I think a general notice to ALL parents about her allergy to perfumes would have been the best course of action.

Apparently, the teacher sent the following e-mail to all parents:

Dear Parents,

With Spring upon us, allergies are in full bloom! I, unfortunately, suffer from allergies all year long. I am allergic to perfume - including perfume which may be found in lotion, hair products, even flowers! As a result of perfume exposure I get blurry vision, headache, trouble breathing, which results in my not being as sharp as I should be as well as uncomfortable. I cannot be an effective teacher for your children under these circumstances. Your child may or may not have mentioned I was out yesterday due to a severe reaction to perfume. So, a reminder: please refrain from any form of perfume if you are dealing with the class, including field trips. If you show up with perfume, one of us will have to leave!

Thanks again for your continuing support.

Yours in allergies,

[name redacted]


(Copied and pasted from the comments on this post on the "Save Seattle Schools" blog)

Whether or not the race of Mr. Mudede's daughter had some influence on the way the teacher handled this incident -- and we really have no way of knowing -- it seems pretty indisputable that the teacher did have genuine allergies and made an effort to notify parents of her needs.
Posted by echizen_kurage on June 22, 2010 at 9:19 AM · Report this
361
If you read the saveseattleschools thread carefully, it says that the letter quoted above was from some years ago, not one that was sent out this year (though it's fair to assume that something similar was sent this year). As I've stated several times on this thread, it's possible and even likely that the teacher had a reaction to something in the vicinity. But how did she know what? It's not as if there was any shortage of options.

Does an allergic reaction to a chemical in a cosmetic constitute cultural insensitivity? I think all thinking people can agree that it does not

I think all thinking people ought to be able to see that it is perfectly possible for racial or cultural insensitivity to exist alongside any physical condition whatsoever. There's nothing preventing this story from being about BOTH culture and chemicals.
Posted by janedeau on June 22, 2010 at 6:08 PM · Report this
362
Mr. Mudede,
Remember that the one constant in all the "racist" interactions you've had in your life... is you.

Please consider the likelihood that some of the incidents of racist injustice you believe you've suffered were in fact your own racial prejudices projected onto your perceived oppressors. It will be helpful during this exercise to disabuse yourself of the common misconception that racial prejudice is an ill suffered solely by blacks, that it is practiced predominantly and ubiquitously by whites, and that whites are immune from experiencing it.

It's apparent from your own telling of this story that all your conclusions are based solely on the color of the teacher's skin and not the content of her character. Take a look, take a long look, at yourself and ask, "How am I different from the racists I hate?"

When you attain colorblindness I'll listen to your wisdom about the folly of our prejudices. In the meantime, I applaud your efforts to improve yourself.
Posted by Landa on June 23, 2010 at 1:46 AM · Report this
363
I use that exact hair product, and others from the line. And I have never noticed a strong smell, much less an "odor". May I also add that I am white. I can't help but wonder if a white child in that class room using that hair product would have made the teacher ill.
Posted by Jessican on June 24, 2010 at 9:58 AM · Report this
364
Chanell#359 said, "You ignorant, separatist heffers!" and "insufferable bitches."

Wow. Did you even get my point?

All sorts of people from all kinds of races and mixes of races can have "curly hair of a certain texture that needs certain products to control it."

If saying that makes me an ignorant, separatist insufferable (did you mean to say "heifer?")-bitch, ... oh well. At least I'm not you.

Posted by CityGal on June 24, 2010 at 10:11 AM · Report this
365
Jessican #353,

Wouldn't the easy way for Muldede to find out if that was the case would be to send her to school without the product and see if she was still treated the same way?

No, it's easier to cry race card and write and article to promote himself.
Posted by CityGal on June 24, 2010 at 10:14 AM · Report this
366
If this is a commentary, fine. But if this is supposed to be a news story, I'd feel a lot better if it were being reported by a person who is one of the principals of the story. This is like asking George Bush to write a news story about U.S.-sanctioned torture of prisoners. Bad news. One-sided reporting.
Posted by H.T. Katt on June 25, 2010 at 3:31 PM · Report this
UnderSerf 367
@366, I think you meant "ISN'T" a principal of th story. And yes, Seattle IS racist. I cannot find the Asian-American Academy, the Latin-American Academy, the Indian-American Academy, the Russian American Academy, the Native-American Academy, the European-American Academy, the Chinese-American Academy, the Meso-American Academy etc. But the African-American Academy is up on Beacon Hill. Racism is as racism does.
Posted by UnderSerf on June 26, 2010 at 8:49 AM · Report this
368
I guess you think the Seattle Girls School is horrifically sexist, then? (And just by the by, the African American Academy is no more.)
Posted by janedeau on June 27, 2010 at 10:11 AM · Report this
369
This incident is not race motivated. The teacher did not handle the situation well, nor did the parent. Mr. Mudede, it's not because your child's hair stinks, the teacher is allergic to the scent. Something in the oil is making her physically ill. The hair product may not be a strong scent to alot of people, but to her and other people who are hypersensitive, just being in the same room with the irritant can lead to anaphylactic shock, which is life threatening. Some people carry epi-pens in case their heart stops during an severe allergic episode. Being stabbed with a syringe full of epinephrene is rather painful too. You cannot tell me you cannot find anything else that can mosturize your little girl's hair. Unscented and natural. Though, if the teachers' allergies to perfume/scented products is that bad, why hasn't she gone for allergy shots? Allergy medications? Or a mixature of both? Doesn't she have health insurance? It must suck to be her, she can't go anywhere or live a normal life, if she can't stand strong scents. Honestly, I feel bad for your child, but if you recieved a call from the teacher about your child's hair, you would have spinned it into something that it's not, which you are doing right now.
Posted by anon220 on June 27, 2010 at 8:33 PM · Report this
370
its funny to me how every time there is anything to do with black people that its automatically racist when the fact of the matter is that you are the racist so clean your daughters hair and and welcome to America 2010 were people like you keep the racism alive. just clean the stank out of the hair and take responsibility for your self. you dropped the ball and on that day you sent your daughter to the school with some over due for a shower hair and it gaged the teacher. guess what, it has happened to me as well and i have came close to throwing up and it wasn't so much the hair but the combo of unshowered body oder and dirty hair (is a bad combo) but of course its racist because if it wasent than you would have to admit that you were a lazy parent...i feel sorry for you...
Posted by obama is not black he is mixed on August 2, 2010 at 2:09 PM · Report this
371
I would like people to admit to the upgrade aspect of marrying white. Though it is not true whites are less likely to have poor credit, criminal history or more likely to raise better children, it is certainly perceived that way in society and so technically you married into the very white privilege you get paid to enviscerate. This is an issue to you because you get paid to be a persecuted black man, but your daughter does not have to be weighed down with the burden of being black when she is not. The real issue is that you married a white woman who can't do her daughter's hair properly and all of this could have been avoided if you took your daughter to a salon in the black part of town to get her hair braided.

Wow! she doesn't have to be weighed down with the 'burden' of being black?!?! is complete ignorance!!!! have you never heard of the KKK? or skinheads? They don't care if there is only 1% in you thats non-white most will want NOTHING to do with you

And you sound VERY racist about your comment that because she's white she can't do her daughters hair I've seen white women who have adopted all black children and can braid cornrows and many other beautiful styles and probably do a better job then you
Posted by KatinCali on August 7, 2010 at 10:40 PM · Report this
372
Everyone on this thread needs to familiarize themselves with the work of Tim Wise. Discrimination is not always obvious; it comes in mnany forms. I don't usually recommend people engage in comments on web stories, due to the lack of intelligent discourse, including ad hominem attacks. However, you've done a nice job of clarifying the argument Charles.
Posted by M.S. Machine on October 4, 2010 at 2:44 PM · Report this
373
Why is it everytime a black person says they are discriminated against some non-black person (usually white b/c most other races know better) chimes in with "No you haven't -- It's all in your head!" That is BULLSHIT. Why can't ya'll just shut the F-up? Nobody cares about what you have to say except ignorant people that are just like you! Ya'll don't know and ya'll will NEVER know what it's like to face BS like this blog describes everyday of you freaking life. You actually think we want to live our lives thinking things that aren't true?! Anyone non-black person who's got something to say about wrongs WE suffer ON THE REG-U-LAR can blow me!
I think Mr. Mudede handled this situation with class and because of this his daughter will always know her worth as a human-being.
Posted by They think they know everything! on December 30, 2010 at 1:05 PM · Report this
374
The teacher absolutely did not behave appropriately in this situation. Regardless if this was the first time the child used this product or the tenth time it was used has no bearing on the teacher's actions. The teacher could have opened a window to get better circulation in the room. Consider this, what if the smell that was making the teacher sick wasn't a hair product. What if it was a child's body odor? Would she have kicked that child out and caused him embarssment too? I seriously doubt it, then again, if she doesn't have any tact she might have. How did the teacher narrow down the smell? Did she walk from child to child taking a whiff untill she felt dizzy?

I agree people have different levels of sensitivity when it comes to smells. I know I do. I too am a teacher and I have students who live in a home where the family incessantly smokes cigerettes. The child, therefore, smells like smoke. I cannot stand it. It makes me weak, however I would not dare kick the child out of my classroom. One year (the ENTIRE year) I taught a child who smelled as if he slept, rolled, and bathed in cat urine (you know THAT distinctive smell), but I dared not kick him out of class. That's insane! I held my breath and taught him like I would anyother child.

The way a child smells... the way anyone smells cannot be controlled. As teachers, dealing with such things is just part of the business.

Imagine if that teacher were told she couldn't come to work because her hair smelled like wet dog... or if she reaked of garlic because she takes garlic supplements... then what kind of conversation would we be having?
Posted by Miss Teacher Lady on January 11, 2011 at 5:57 PM · Report this
375
she was made to sit in a classroom that had more black students in it (the implication being that this is where she really belongs, in the lower class with the other black students- see this sounds alittle fishy to me, your own words. I dont like alot of scents either maybe it was a combination of things and the teacher should have not put her out but sent a note home with regards to allergies or something. I am black and my childrens father is asian, they have very dark thick hair but I dont douse them with product. Some people dont like the smell, not to sound like you but maybe your white wife should take it easy on the products, it's not that serious her main concern should be keeping her hair clean and not playing "fun with my half black baby" at the color people section in walmart, seriously no offense but the schools have better things to concern themselves with I mean you did say the black kids were "lower class"
Posted by Can U Sit Down:) Thanks on March 17, 2011 at 12:30 PM · Report this

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