Yeah, it's a copy of that.

meanderer
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Oct 19, 2012 meanderer commented on No Right to Remain Silent.
Gah sorry about the double post!
Oct 19, 2012 meanderer commented on No Right to Remain Silent.
I found myself in a similar situation once when a federal prosecutor wanted access to my sources for an article I wrote about a shooting. Luckily, I was able to get pro bono counsel and they negotiated a deal - I testified but did not reveal any sources who had not already agreed to come forward.

What I wonder is this: in my case, the shooting I wrote about involved a felon, and therefore the case was a felony case. My attorneys told me that, should I resist a motion to compel in a felony case, I would not just be thrown in jail, I would also become a felon. No trial, no conviction, do not collect $200, go straight to being a felon. I would lose the right to vote in some places, lose the ability to live in many apartments, lose the ability to get a security clearance and probably many jobs (outside of journalism, anyway), and much more. That was scarier to me than jail.

So, I wonder: does the same thing apply here? On top of being thrown in jail for resisting a motion to compel, will Plante and the others now also be felons? (I'm assuming it's felony-level because federal prosecutors are involved, but please correct me if I'm wrong.) If so, the damage here goes well beyond simple imprisonment for up to 18 months. This will follow them for the rest of their lives.
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Oct 19, 2012 meanderer joined My Stranger Face
Oct 19, 2012 meanderer commented on No Right to Remain Silent.
I found myself in a similar situation once when a federal prosecutor wanted access to my sources for an article I wrote about a shooting. Luckily, I was able to get pro bono counsel and they negotiated a deal - I testified but did not reveal any sources who had not already agreed to come forward.

What I wonder is this: in my case, the shooting I wrote about involved a felon, and therefore the case was a felony case. My attorneys told me that, should I resist a motion to compel in a felony case, I would not just be thrown in jail, I would also become a felon. No trial, no conviction, do not collect $200, go straight to being a felon. I would lose the right to vote in some places, lose the ability to live in many apartments, lose the ability to get a security clearance and probably many jobs (outside of journalism, anyway), and much more. That was scarier to me than jail.

So, I wonder: does the same thing apply here? On top of being thrown in jail for resisting a motion to compel, will Plante and the others now also be felons? (I'm assuming it's felony-level because federal prosecutors are involved, but please correct me if I'm wrong.) If so, the damage here goes well beyond simple imprisonment for up to 18 months. This will follow them for the rest of their lives.
More...
 
 

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