It's not very popular.

a beales
report this user
Nov 17, 2012 a beales commented on 216 Nipples Later.
Just wanna say "thanks" to Cable, Jen and everybody else who's approached this subject reasonably and with some degree of sensitivity. The only real issue here, so far as I can see, is that two women, unsurprisingly, didn't want a crude cartoon of saggy boobs attached to their names in the lobby of their friggin' workplace. How hard can it possibly be to grasp that, in this context, Beres' piece might constitute an invasive, thoughtless and rather creepy form of sexual harassment - regardless of artistic intent?

I can't believe that any compassionate and even semi-progressive adult would downplay that in favor of the easy opportunity to cry "censorship!". The piece isn't being scrubbed from the world. The artist isn't being legally censured. Cornish has merely decided that this venue isn't appropriate for this particular piece - which, come on, is patently obvious. They're right. Their employees deserve at least that much consideration.

It's a cheap rhetorical device, but if you disagree, I want you to imagine your mom, sister or daughter being asked to endure a piece of art consisting of just their name accompanied by of a crude rendering of a vagina (just to up the stakes a little) in the lobby every morning when they show up at work. Art should be free to express itself, sure, but at the same time, men need to be a hell of a lot more aware of the world they create in flexing their unearned privilege.
More...
Nov 17, 2012 a beales joined My Stranger Face
Nov 17, 2012 a beales commented on 216 Nipples Later.
Just wanna say "thanks" to Cable, Jen and everybody else who's approached this subject reasonably and with some degree of sensitivity. The only real issue here, so far as I can see, is that two women, unsurprisingly, didn't want a crude cartoon of saggy boobs attached to their names in the lobby of their friggin' workplace! How hard can it possibly be to grasp that, in this context, Beres' piece might constitute an invasive, thoughtless and rather creepy form of sexual harassment - regardless of artistic intent?

I can't believe that any compassionate and even semi-progressive adult would downplay that in favor of the opportunity to cry "censorship!". The piece isn't being scrubbed from the world. The artist isn't being legally censured. Cornish has merely decided that this venue isn't appropriate for this particular piece - which, come on, is patently obvious. They're right. Their employees deserve at least that much consideration.

It's a cheap rhetorical device, but if you disagree, I want you to imagine your mom, sister or daughter being asked to endure a piece of art consisting of just their name accompanied by of a crude rendering of a vagina (just to up the stakes a little) every morning when they show up at work. Art should be free to express itself, sure, but at the same time, men need to be a hell of a lot more aware of the world they create in flexing their privilege.
More...
 

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC
1535 11th Ave (Third Floor), Seattle, WA 98122
Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy