Melinda S.
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Dec 9, 2013 Melinda S. commented on The Homeschool Apostates.
Sorry my comments were posted twice.
Dec 9, 2013 Melinda S. commented on The Homeschool Apostates.
The problem with increasing supervision of homeschoolers is that it is unlikely to make any actual difference for the children involved. Those who are good and non-abusive parents and careful homeschoolers will continue to be so, though they will be burdened by heavier paperwork and regulations. Historical evidence shows that those who break the laws already (laws against child abuse and laws requiring a decent education of children, which the vast majority of states already have) will find ways around the laws and will continue to be law-breakers, because their way "is better."

Kids who are in public schools, with their enormous layers of bureaucracy and mandatory reporters are still abused almost at the parents' will. Ask any teacher whether they feel current "accountability" measures are helping or hurting their ability to teach their kids well. You will find it adds many layers of burden and weeds out few to none of the bad apples.

Kids who are already known to DCFS and under their direct supervision are still abused by their parents, often for many years. They might eventually be removed or they might not be, but it very often happens that DCFS supervision does little for the kids involved.

Abusive parents have always taught their kids to lie to other adults ("If you tell them the truth, they will put you in foster care and not feed you...."), justify their own actions ("you deserve this because you won't respect me"), and teach their kids that this is normal behavior. Kids who are abused don't know any different, whether they go to a homeschool or a public school. Public school kids might be able to tell a teacher, but they usually think every parent is like this and it's expected.

Abuse has far more to do with the parents than it does with the schooling situation, and adding regulations seems to do little to stop it. It might make people feel better, like they are "doing something about it," but in real life, it winds up hurting those who were doing well and not helping those who weren't.
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Dec 9, 2013 Melinda S. joined My Stranger Face
Dec 9, 2013 Melinda S. commented on The Homeschool Apostates.
The problem with increasing supervision of homeschoolers is that it is unlikely to make any actual difference for the children involved. Those who are good and non-abusive parents and careful homeschoolers will continue to be so, though they will be burdened by heavier paperwork and regulations. Historical evidence shows that those who break the laws already (laws against child abuse and laws requiring a decent education of children, which the vast majority of states already have) will find ways around the laws and will continue to be law-breakers, because their way "is better."

Kids who are in public schools, with their enormous layers of bureaucracy and mandatory reporters are still abused almost at the parents' will. Ask any teacher whether they feel current "accountability" measures are helping or hurting their ability to teach their kids well. You will find it adds many layers of burden and weeds out few to none of the bad apples.

Kids who are already known to DCFS and under their direct supervision are still abused by their parents, often for many years. They might eventually be removed or they might not be, but it very often happens that DCFS supervision does little for the kids involved.

Abusive parents have always taught their kids to lie to other adults ("If you tell them the truth, they will put you in foster care and not feed you...."), justify their own actions ("you deserve this because you won't respect me"), and teach their kids that this is normal behavior. Kids who are abused don't know any different, whether they go to a homeschool or a public school. Public school kids might be able to tell a teacher, but they usually think every parent is like this and it's expected.

Abuse has far more to do with the parents than it does with the schooling situation, and adding regulations seems to do little to stop it. It might make people feel better, like they are "doing something about it," but in real life, it winds up hurting those who were doing well and not helping those who weren't.
More...