MON
SEP 15, 2014


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An Excerpt from ‘Happy Days’

Why: Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days is the one where the lady is partially buried in a pile of dirt the whole time onstage. It’s boundlessly strange and great, and tonight at Solo, New Century Theatre Company treats us all to a free reading featuring the incredible Amy Thone (a certified Stranger Genius), during which we can get good and drunk, just like old Sam would’ve wanted. Will there be dirt?! (This reading’s part of Seattle Beckett Festival, and hell yes for that; it goes through November, see seattlebeckettfest.org.) (Solo Bar, 200 Roy St, solo-bar.com, 7:30 pm, free, 21+)

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TUE
SEP 16, 2014


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‘Love Is Strange’

Why: Ira Sachs’s Love Is Strange is a love story of incredible intimacy and depth, told through an accumulation of scenes that are both lyrical and adamantly life-size. John Lithgow and Alfred Molina star as a longstanding couple whose legal marriage throws their lives into chaos. A job is revoked, a home is lost, and the couple is temporarily split up among welcoming friends and relatives. What follows is an expertly guided tour of the human condition in miniature, with Love Is Strange proving as rich in its ellipses as Boyhood. (Harvard Exit, 807 E Roy St, thestranger.com/film)

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WED
SEP 17, 2014


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Seattle Fringe Festival

Why: Today marks the beginning of the 2014 Seattle Fringe Festival: 22 productions over five days at four locations including Annex Theatre and the Northwest Film Forum. Promising-sounding bets this evening include nervy and hilarious local solo performer Keira McDonald teaming up with NYC performer James Judd in Breathe Normally; award-winning, LA-based fringe darlings Sound and Fury bring their Hamlet and Juliet; and a 10-playwright group, corralled by Stephanie Timm, exploring the idea of passing judgment on strangers in What You Think You Know. (Various times and locations across Capitol Hill, see seattlefringefestival.org for full details)

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THU
SEP 18, 2014


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Hieroglyphic Being

Why: For the last dozen years, Chicago’s Hieroglyphic Being (Jamal Moss) has been tearing up his hometown’s world-famous house-music blueprint and devising new strategies. A restless experimenter, Moss has injected a wide range of bizarre tonalities and strangely angled rhythms into what has become a staid genre. (His “Imaginary Landscapes” series similarly weirds up ambient music.) At 2013’s Debacle Fest, Hieroglyphic Being fused Conrad Schnitzler’s infernal analog-synth machinations with Sun Ra’s unpredictable astral jazz; it was mind-boggling. Expect more of that spectacular boundary-busting tonight. (Kremwerk, 1809 Minor Ave, kremwerk.com, 9 pm, $10, 21+)



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2014 Neddy at Cornish Exhibition

Why: The Neddy Awards—$25,000 each to two winners and $1,500 each to six finalists—are given every year to “individuals who create outstanding work with an applied consciousness of responsibility to society.” This joint exhibition of all their works gives you a chance to consider what the criteria mean and whether you’d have applied them the same way, and it’s also a good survey of strong Seattle artists. This year’s winners are Susanna Bluhm and Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes, and the finalists are Claude Zervas, Mark Calderon, Clyde Petersen, Joey Veltkamp, and Kimberly Trowbridge—painters, sculptors, and collagists whose works touch on landscape, gender, race, music, Western art history, patterning, and grief. It’s a small but big show. (Cornish College of the Arts Main Gallery, 1000 Lenora St, cornish.edu/neddy_at_cornish, noon–5 pm, free, through Oct 18)

FRI
SEP 19, 2014


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Charles Burns

Why: When it comes to comics, there’s a simple rule: You can’t go wrong with Charles Burns. The Seattle-born cartoonist, whose masterpiece Black Hole was, weirdly, just featured in the newest Planet of the Apes movie, will share his brand-new book in a rare reading/party. Sugar Skull is a continuation of Burns’s delightful Tintin riff—a smorgasbord of teen angst, punk rock, and the creepiest birthing scene you’ve read all year. It’s such a fucked-up, beautiful artifact from an obviously fractured psyche that you’ll be shocked when you see how normal Burns seems in person. (Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 1201 S Vale St, fantagraphics.com, 6 pm, free)

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SAT
SEP 20, 2014


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Susan Pascal Quartet

Why: Those wondrous, vaporous, Venusian sounds of the vibraphone never fail to enchant a room. And one of the most noted local masters of this magical instrument is Susan Pascal, who performs regularly at Tula’s. Tonight, she plays with three distinguished musicians: Marc Seales, the professor of jazz piano at the University of Washington, Phil Sparks, a bassist with a deep knowledge of his instrument, and D’Vonne Lewis, a talented young drummer who leads a band, Industrial Revelation, that’s one of the nominees for the 2014 Stranger Genius Award for music. This is a night of local jazz that will reveal the depth of the genre’s history and the beauty of a voluptuous planet. (Tula’s, 2214 Second Ave, tulas.com, 7:30 pm, $15, all ages until 10 pm/21+ after)

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Books

Nothing suggested today, but here's what's coming up!

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SUN
SEP 21, 2014


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Happy Hour at RockCreek

Why: If it’s between 4 and 6 p.m., and you’re in Seattle, head to RockCreek immediately and hope like hell for a seat in the bar. Happy hour there includes $8 cocktails (caipirinhas, recently), $5 glasses of wine, and $25 bottles of bubbly, presented properly in a silver ice bucket. A half-dozen happy-hour plates include a pretty $5 Chioggia beet salad with arugula, ricotta, and hazelnuts, smartly tweaked with pickled onion, and a $9 cornmeal-battered oyster sandwich with Nueske’s bacon and sriracha aioli on a very tasty, challah-like roll. Tuna crudo is usually available, too, for only $7. It’s all really good. (4300 Fremont Ave N, rockcreekseattle.com, daily 4–6 pm and 10 pm–close)

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