Music

Data Breaker

Psychemagik, Bankie Phones, Airport, Matt Carlson, Panabrite

Data Breaker

BANKIE PHONES

WEDNESDAY 2/6

PSYCHEMAGIK'S "DREAMS"-Y DISCO

The record-collecting fiends behind British duo Psychemagik have infiltrated the global club circuit via crowd-pleasing remixes/reedits of Fleetwood Mac's "Dreams," the Yardbirds' "For Your Love" (via Chilly), and other nostalgia-triggering tunes. As their name implies, Psychemagik imbue everything they touch with a lush, intensely vivid detail in the arrangements and orchestrations. Theirs is a classy breed of disco that also revels in mucking around with the masses. All this and a methodically rump-shaking track called "Ass Nation"? Yup. With Slowpøke DJs and Trouble. Q, 9 pm, free, 21+.

THURSDAY 2/7

RISKY DISCO WITH BANKIE PHONES, AIRPORT, AND CRYSTAL HELL POOL

Sam Melancon's superb Motor night moves to Electric Tea Garden after a rewarding stint at Lo-Fi. Familiar Motor figures Airport (aka Jayson Kochan) and Crystal Hell Pool (aka Chris Majerus) bring their distinctive versions of disco and drone to the low-ceilinged decadence den that is ETG. Airport—who has a 12-inch titled "Sweat"/"Pleasure" coming out on Melancon's Debacle label March 12—loads his marauding, Moroder-esque rhythms with infinite choir loops and spacey, spine-tingling, Italo-cized signifiers while CHP sheds a blood-red light on his grippingly grim 4/4 dance beats. Bankie Phones (aka producer/.gif master Frankie Crescioni) impressed the hell out of me while opening for Gavin Russom late last year. Mr. Phones has a playful, exceptionally vibrant way with "primordial dankwave," "Wi†çh Høü$£," "pre-post-dubstep" and other half-jokey subgenres that will make your hips clownishly smile. With Xua, DJ Slow, and Jon Carr. Electric Tea Garden, 8 pm, $5, 21+.

SATURDAY 2/9

NIGHT OF THE ANALOG-SYNTH MAGI WITH MATT CARLSON AND PANABRITE

Do you realize how fortunate you are to have two of the country's finest synthesizer magi gathered in one tiny space tonight? Seriously, Portland's Matt Carlson and Seattle's Panabrite (aka Norm Chambers) are like 21st-century equivalents to Morton Subotnick and J D Emmanuel: alchemists of timbre, masters of using analog gear to create a strange language of avian and insectoid phantasms. Cornish grad Carlson's output veers more toward the disjunctive and disturbing, favoring cranky, spluttering tone eructations contoured into engrossing spatial puzzles—gnarled patterns that take hours to untangle, but are so worth the effort. Panabrite's releases generally conjure more pacific feelings, but his electronic paeans and cerulean drones soar into far more transcendental and emotionally profound strata than your typical new-age release. Watch them both turn Cairo into a planetarium. With Secret Colors. Cairo, 8 pm, $5, all ages.

 

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