Curt Doughty

The Final Seattle Sing Sing

Last Friday at the War Room marked the final installment of Sing Sing, the "hipster" dance night hosted and DJ'd by Clayton Vomero (aka DJ Pretty Titty, CEO of Death of the Party, curator of DJ mix series We Make It Good). After three years in Seattle—first at Havana, then at Chop Suey, and finally at the War Room—Vomero and his night are moving to New York. And while that city isn't exactly desperate for dance nights, if Vomero's hustle and ambition in Seattle is any indication, he should do just fine there. As if to ease the transition, the final edition of Sing Sing hosted NYC's Drop the Lime, a deservedly frequent guest in Seattle. The night's core crowd of Capitol Hill club kids and weekenders from who knows where was out as always, but, approaching midnight, it was still a relatively staid Sing Sing, a casual send-off rather than one big last bang. Which begs the questions: What's going to replace Sing Sing? Will Seattle really hurt for one less bloghouse-y club night, even one with this night's caliber of guests? Is the city sufficiently saturated already?

Emerald City Soul Club's Rare Soul Weekender, Skinheads

Who knows? But one night that's absolutely not hurting for a crowd is Emerald City Soul Club at the Lo-Fi. On Saturday, the third night of their Rare Soul Weekender, there was a line out the door and down the block for hours at the Lo-Fi, while inside, the action on the dual dance floors was just slightly more sharp-dressed and soulful than usual (one DJ even played a $15,000 45). Speaking of SHARP, this Soul Club had an unfortunate brawl between some skinheads (presumably of the antiracist stripe) and some dude in a Sgt. Pepper outfit. If there's one thing more annoying than the Anglophilia involved in soul nights or scooter clubs or dressing up like Sgt. Pepper, it's the violent, thuggish Anglophilia of styling yourself a British-style skinhead. I'm sorry, but the mere virtue of not being a white supremacist (and, again, I'm presuming here) doesn't make it any less lame to go to dance nights to start fights (same goes for you, Sgt. Pepper). I thought I ditched that tough-guy shit when I stopped going to straight-edge hardcore shows.

Past Lives' Record Release Party

Now I only go to post-hardcore shows of the decidedly non-straight-edge variety, such as that same night's show at a warehouse space nearby, where Past Lives were celebrating the release of their new Strange Symmetry EP on Suicide Squeeze. Talbot Tagora opened, and this column has covered both these bands plenty. Suffice it to say, though, that both played stronger and more confident sets than before (Talbot Tagora's vocals were even a little more forceful and up-front), and both seem to have grown into themselves significantly in the past several months. Expect to hear even more and better from them in the near future. recommended