Northwest Marijuana Guide

Welcome, Stoners!

Don't Call Him the "Pot Czar"

The Pioneers

Shit Just Got Real, Stoners!

A Few Little Pot Districts

What Happens If the Feds Sue?

Beyond Cheech & Chong

Where to Stash Your Cash?


The Timeline

Rub It In

Can the Medical Pot Law Be Saved?

Will Pot Ruin Your Manhood?

The Ideal Legal Joint: Low in Potency, High in Flavor

Don't Smoke Pot

Council Tries to Ban Medical Marijuana

Cannabis Calendar

Cannabis Calendar

The Stranger's Green Business Guide

Even before Initiative 502 passed, friends, and friends of friends, have asked me to pick up bud for them from dispensaries. Now, I would like to buy the world a toke. But I'm not a drug mule (unless it's Christmas and I'm traveling home to Mom's). And I'm not a drug dealer (anymore). Card-carrying friends like me—that is, people with authorizations for legal medical cannabis—may seem like your pot fairies, but before you ask them, ask yourself a few questions:

Why do you want them to buy you pot? Is it because you don't have a reliable connection? Is this person close to you? Would you listen to them talk about their dead grandpa/ex-girlfriend/failed college exam while they cry for an extended period of time? If not, don't ask them to commit a felony for you. Are you smoking a bunch of weed with your friend? Are they agreeing to buy drugs for you so that you will stop mooching?

If you still think it's worth asking, be discreet.

Do not leave a digital trail: Do not hit up your friend on Facespace; do not send them a text message about pot. Sharing or trading in medical marijuana with nonpatients is illegal on the state and federal level. So do not talk openly about someone else's authorization—in front of friends or in a bar. If necessary, talk about flowers, Bruce Banner, broccoli. This is not just THC-induced paranoia: We live in an age of surveillance.

You should respect the fact that your friend is a patient. Don't assume that they smoke weed recreationally, even if they smoke with you while you are smoking recreationally.

Patients and recreational users alike should be able to know what they're buying—strains, THC and cannabinoid content—and they should not have to go hang out in a basement watching Two and a Half Men reruns and getting their dealer high. They should be able to choose sativa or indica, munchies or giggles, pain management or sleeping aid. Your patient-friends feel you. We want you to have the best pot with the least hassle. But realize that the favor you're asking is not like grabbing you a Snickers as long as we're already at the 7-Eleven. recommended