Nestora Salgado, Mexican activist and naturalized U.S. citizen, returned home to Seattle after spending over two years in a Mexican prison. Salgado was arrested while working with the community police force in her hometown of Olinalá.
Nestora Salgado, a dual Mexico-U.S. citizen, returned home to Seattle yesterday after spending over two years in a Mexican prison. Alex Garland

Salgado had organized a community self-defense group in her hometown against drug cartels. The government is against people who want to do the right thing and protect their communities, she told The Guardian.
Salgado had organized a community self-defense group in her hometown against drug cartels. "The government is against people who want to do the right thing and protect their communities," she told The Guardian. Free Nestora Campaign

Nestora Salgado embraces her husband, Jose Avila, during their first visit in more than two years since her arrest in August 2013. The state of Guerro, Mexico, charged Nestora with kidnapping after she placed a town official under arrest for theft.
Salgado embraces her husband, Jose Avila, during their first visit in more than two years. She was released from prison last Friday after a Mexican judge ruled that the kidnapping and murder charges against her were baseless. The United Nations had declared her detention illegal. Alex Garland

All charges against Nestora Salgado were dropped last week and she was released from prison in Mexico City. She was transferred there in 2015 after protesting a lack of medical care by going on hunger strike.
All charges against Salgado were dropped last week and she was released from prison in Mexico City. She was transferred there in 2015 after going on hunger strike to protest lack of medical care. Alex Garland

Dozens of supporters welcomed Salgado at Sea-Tac airport. Salgado spoke to the crowd in a mix of Spanish and English,
Dozens of supporters welcomed Salgado at Sea-Tac airport. "I’m happy to be here," she said, speaking in Spanish and English. "I want to say thank you for everything" Alex Garland

A victory celebration and protest for other political prisoners is taking place on March 26th at the Mexican Consulate in Seattle. When asked if Salgado plans to return to Mexico, she replied “I’m scared to come back to Mexico but I have to come back because my people need me. My people need somebody to put their voices out, I hope I come back soon. My people need help. My people need too many things.”
A victory celebration and protest for other political prisoners is planned for March 26 at noon at the Mexican Consulate in Seattle. Asked if she plans to return to Mexico, Salgado replied, "I’m scared to come back to Mexico, but I have to come back because my people need me... My people need help. My people need too many things.” Alex Garland