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Thursday, September 13, 2012

Why My Budget Will Dedicate $5 Million to Expand Rail in Seattle

Posted by on Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 3:13 PM

This guest post is by Mike McGinn, mayor of Seattle.

At last month’s groundbreaking for Sound Transit’s Northgate Link light rail line, you could see the excitement on everyone’s faces. Families, commuters, and business owners came out to celebrate the coming of rail to the University District, Roosevelt, and Northgate. It’s no surprise that Seattle loves rail: We vote for it in droves. The question for our region is no longer if we are going to expand rail our rail system, but when we can get a rail line to your neighborhood.

That’s why my 2013 proposed budget will dedicate $6 million of new funding for the expansion of transit in Seattle, including $5 million for high-priority corridors where rail makes the most sense. That funding will support planning work for these corridors, allowing us to determine the best alignment and mode. And we already know that rail is the leading candidate, which I cover below. This is what my budget proposal, which I present to the Seattle City Council on September 24, would fund:

· $2 million for a corridor analysis of a high-capacity transit line from downtown to University District, via Eastlake. If approved by the council, this work would begin next year.

· $1 million for a corridor analysis of a bus rapid transit line on Madison Street, from downtown to Madison Park.

· $500,000 for a study of a pedestrian, bike, and transit crossing of the ship canal. A north/south crossing of the ship canal, which runs from Ballard to Montlake, would allow transit to flow more freely past this obstacle without getting stuck in traffic.

· A $2.5 million reserve fund to help pay for the the next phase of design work on this top corridor, starting in 2014.

Why did we pick these corridors, and why do we think rail is the best mode of transportation for them?

Earlier this year, we updated the city’s Transit Master Plan (TMP) to identify corridors with the greatest need for more transit. Here's what we found: Although Sound Transit is doing a great job connecting regional centers, like cities and suburbs, to each other, our greatest need is connecting Seattle neighborhoods to one another, and to our growing regional system.

The TMP identified several high-capacity transit corridors and the best mode of transit to serve them: A rail line from downtown to Ballard, via Fremont, has the greatest ridership potential. Other top priorities include: a rail line linking the South Lake Union streetcar with the First Hill streetcar, a rail line connecting downtown to the University District, and a bus rapid transit line down Madison Street. The great news is that the Seattle City Council unanimously approved the TMP in spring.

Since then, we’ve been getting to work:

· We reached an agreement with Sound Transit to accelerate planning on the Ballard line by three years. The city’s joint planning effort with them is expected to begin later this year with selection of a consultant to lead the corridor analysis work, which will be complete in late 2014.
· We have already selected a consultant to lead the corridor analysis on the Center City Connector. Public meetings will start later this fall and the analysis will be complete late next year.
· Meanwhile, we started construction of the First Hill streetcar, with extensions down to Pioneer Square and to the north on Broadway.

That means we already have significant work prioritized by the TMP underway.

Here's the deal: Building rail or bus rapid transit requires a series of defined steps. Each line has to go through a detailed corridor analysis, which then informs specific route and transit technology selection. There is a spectrum of rail options. For instance, the study could find that a streetcar would serve the most riders or a light-right line would be more effective. Once the route and technology are locked in, then comes design and environmental analysis. This all takes time and there are no shortcuts. But, this is what sets up the city to get construction funding.

So how long does it take? With the First Hill streetcar, it will have taken five years to go from a concept (2009) to opening for service (2014). And that’s fast compared with other similar projects. But with the work we've done already, we're moving steadily towards the finish line for these projects. Not that we won't face challenges—but doing the planning and groundwork is how you create the momentum to reach the finish line.

And what will we get once we reach the finish line? We will finally have a transportation system connecting many of our most vibrant neighborhoods with efficient and high quality transit service. It will be able to move a lot more people around our city:

· Ballard to downtown via Fremont has the greatest ridership potential. The TMP estimated that rail will increase ridership by 12,500 people per day in that corridor. Rail is the only mode that produced those gains. Use would be high overall with 26,000 people riding a Ballard rail line each day.
· The Center City connector is expected to carry up to 12,600 riders per day;
· the Eastlake rail line would carry up to 25,000 per day, 10,700 of which would be new
· and, the Madison bus rapid transit line would carry up to 14,000 per day.

The farther along you get in the planning process, the easier it is to identify and secure federal grant funding. If past success is any guide, these projects will be very competitive. We will also continue to leverage local partnerships, and look to our own budget resources to keep the momentum on these projects going.

But we have momentum now. That matters. For projects like these, getting going is often the hardest part. As I have learned, once a major capital project gets up a head of steam, it can be hard to slow down. That’s not to say it will be easy. There will be tough choices on alignments, technology, and funding. But there are also solutions. And we are heading down the right track.

 

Comments (63) RSS

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1
Right on, Mike.
Posted by noamg on September 13, 2012 at 3:18 PM · Report this
2
Can anybody tell me why West Seattle didn't get in on this deal?
Posted by howie in seattle on September 13, 2012 at 3:21 PM · Report this
3
And for those of us living in the south end?
Posted by hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh on September 13, 2012 at 3:22 PM · Report this
Banned on The Seattle Times 4
Obviously McDumbass has never ridden the #11 bus to Madison Park - an empty bus at most times...
Posted by Banned on The Seattle Times on September 13, 2012 at 3:29 PM · Report this
5
@2 probably because we're getting BRT, the C line, instead.
Posted by Westside forever on September 13, 2012 at 3:30 PM · Report this
kitschnsync 6
Thanks for working to make a difference, Mayor McGinn.

/in before the armchair generals
Posted by kitschnsync on September 13, 2012 at 3:30 PM · Report this
7
Four more years.
Posted by tiktok on September 13, 2012 at 3:30 PM · Report this
8
Political posturing and bullshit. Sure, piss away $5 million in precious public funds that will end up in the pockets of politically connected consultants for a "study" that will end up on a dusty shelf. In other words, business as usual.
Posted by moreofthesame on September 13, 2012 at 3:30 PM · Report this
kitschnsync 9
Oops. Looks like I typed too soon.
Posted by kitschnsync on September 13, 2012 at 3:31 PM · Report this
Posted by Gordon Werner on September 13, 2012 at 3:34 PM · Report this
11
Hurray! Light Rail, Street Cars, Bike Paths, Transit Stations, Infrastructure for East of I-5. More investment, more money, more federal funding, yay!

West of I-5.... marginally faster buses down Aurora...
Posted by East vs West on September 13, 2012 at 3:34 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 12
Gotta love McGinn trying to save his butt before he starts facing challenges for a second term in a few months. Too late to be sure but he's trying.

I voted for you in the primary and in the general but not again.
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on September 13, 2012 at 3:36 PM · Report this
seandr 13
Mike, you forgot to mention that once we finish building all of this nifty rail, it will cost the city millions more dollars per year in subsidies to operate than buses currently do.

Are you aware how much money the SLUT burns up each year in operational costs? Or even worse, Portland's streetcars? Where does that budget come from?
Posted by seandr on September 13, 2012 at 3:37 PM · Report this
14
Lotsa McGinn on Slog today, huh?
Posted by gloomy gus on September 13, 2012 at 3:39 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 15
@13, the third stadium will magically pay for it. Somehow...just trust him.
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on September 13, 2012 at 3:39 PM · Report this
Cato the Younger Younger 16
@14, and expect much much more in the months to come! Slog was really behind McGinn 4 years ago and now with him not being very popular he's going back to a part of his base support.
Posted by Cato the Younger Younger on September 13, 2012 at 3:41 PM · Report this
kitschnsync 17
I think McGinn expected the arena deal to be his ace in the hole. The City Council managed to steal credit for that, which was a masterful stroke for them.

But don't forget: It started in the Mayor's office, basketball fans.
Posted by kitschnsync on September 13, 2012 at 3:46 PM · Report this
Will in Seattle 18
@13 compared to the SR-99 boondoggle?

The toll revenue shortfall from that makes this pennies on the dollar.
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on September 13, 2012 at 3:48 PM · Report this
kitschnsync 19
Oh, and for those of you who think McGinn has been terrible on issues like police accountability: Mayor Burgess.

Say that out loud a few times, and then think about the issue again.
Posted by kitschnsync on September 13, 2012 at 3:49 PM · Report this
Matt the Engineer 20
Unlike early media assumptions of these studies, this looks well thought out and will leave room for the Seattle Subway. Thanks for posting.
Posted by Matt the Engineer on September 13, 2012 at 3:58 PM · Report this
seandr 21
@19: Right, Burgess' experience as a police officer is really going to work against him when it comes to managing the SPD.

It's a moot point, however, given that Pete Holmes is going to be our next mayor.
Posted by seandr on September 13, 2012 at 4:07 PM · Report this
22
I don't live in Seattle, I live in Cleveland, 100 years ago we were where you are today. It's been a long decline. I'm not familiar with your current local politics so won't comment on them. I will tell you this however. These types of projects matter, they matter in ways you don't expect. They matter big time when your no longer the hot spot and ascending.

Cleveland would be a total shit hole to live in if hadn't been for some major public amenities put in place when we were the shit, when our "millionaires row" was known worldwide.

When your thinking about this type of stuff, try and look down the road 100 years. And I don't mean just Rail and public transportation systems, we sorta dropped the ball on that one, but parks and recreation, educational institutions, museums, Arts & theater, sports teams, Utilities (congratulations your pubic electric utility is still producing power) your port and lake front er ocean front.....etc I think you get my point.

These aren't short term short return investments, they will be there to catch you when you start to decline.
Posted by Machiavelli was framed on September 13, 2012 at 4:09 PM · Report this
23
Michael McGinn, is such a corrupt sack of shit, ain't he? Is there any developer or billionaire he won't suck up to? Is there any lie he won't tell? Buh-bye, you idiot. Maybe your new butt-buddy Chris Hansen will give you a job selling peanuts and beer in his arena.
Posted by Mister G on September 13, 2012 at 4:10 PM · Report this
Sargon Bighorn 24
There is no way to build rail to West Seattle and not take up two lanes that are for cars on the bridge. And there is no room to build rail on any West Seattle streets with out displacing cars.
Posted by Sargon Bighorn on September 13, 2012 at 4:23 PM · Report this
kitschnsync 25
Seandr @21, Cops aren't the best at policing cops. Burgess would overlook the occasional unprovoked beating of a citizen in order to avoid impugning the authority of the police.

Remember Burgess' panhandling bill, which McGinn vetoed? That's the type of Seattle Burgess wants: Sanitized for the wealthy, ignoring the rights of the disadvantaged.
Posted by kitschnsync on September 13, 2012 at 4:24 PM · Report this
Baconcat 26
Seattle is falling behind San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, Houston and SLC in terms of aggressive transit planning for their city's respective cores. It's time to actually get a move on and do the same here.
Posted by Baconcat on September 13, 2012 at 4:33 PM · Report this
Will in Seattle 27
@23 so how many times do you plan to sneak in line again tonite to get a free beer?
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on September 13, 2012 at 4:44 PM · Report this
28
@2 - I think Mayor McGinn's plan to address West Seattle's transportation issues has been totally clear. By not funding any reasonable transit solutions that service the area, and choosing the solution for the viaduct issue that would cost the most and do the least to eleviate congestion, his plan is to create such an enormous cluster-fuck that property values will plummet to a level where all the underwater homeowners have no option but to walk away from their houses and move into tiny apartments in the city. West Seattle will then be like a giant tent city - but the homeless will just get to live in the abandoned bank owned houses. It's a very progressive solution, really.
Posted by ThanksMike on September 13, 2012 at 4:50 PM · Report this
29
@2 - I think McGinn is hoping that West Seattle home values drop so low that everyone is forced to walk away from their underwater mortgages and leave their homes vacant, to instead house the cities homeless in a giant peninsula sized tent-city. It's very progressive actually - and the only explanation for the Tunnel, the lack of transit, the complete cluster-fuck of a renovation on the bridge and the fact that there are no services planned.
Posted by westsider on September 13, 2012 at 5:01 PM · Report this
Will in Seattle 30
I should point out that 26,000 people a day is about one-third the current revised projection usage for the SR-99 Billionaires Tunnel ... but at 1/2500th the price that means literally ONE HUNDRED TIMES AS MANY COMMUTERS PER DOLLAR for McGinn's plan.

It's all about the ridership. And the Streetcar Pub Crawls.
Posted by Will in Seattle http://www.facebook.com/WillSeattle on September 13, 2012 at 5:06 PM · Report this
31
Can we dedicate some money to throw at Light rail so they could possibly speed up construction? I'd like to be able to ride to Northgate or Ballard before I'm dead.

Posted by UNPAID COMMENTER on September 13, 2012 at 5:06 PM · Report this
32
To build the eastlake light rail you'd probably have to remove parking and/or mess up a major cycling commuter route. But I have an easy fix!

Just buy this ONE PROPERTY:

http://goo.gl/maps/rd7ch

...and turn it into a park with bike lane. Suddenly you've got a beautiful waterfront ride with no hills all the way from the U to downtown.
Posted by Big Adventure Steve on September 13, 2012 at 5:21 PM · Report this
Cascadian Bacon 33
Looks like a whole lot of analyzing and not a whole lot of doing, and a whole lot of tax payer dollars we do not have going into the pockets of well connected consultants.

I will be glad to see McGinn tossed out on his ass next election.

Unemployment would be fitting for a mayor who looks like a bum.
Posted by Cascadian Bacon on September 13, 2012 at 5:21 PM · Report this
34
Mr McGinn, why are you writing about this 5 million dollars instead of the 100s of millions of dollars you and the council are risking on a new stadium? Your priorities seem to be seriously broken.
Posted by Asdfgh on September 13, 2012 at 5:53 PM · Report this
35
@33 exactly my thoughts! fuck planning, let's just get out there and lay down some track in the middle of the street, and hope it all works out!
Posted by The Lady from the Blue Bonnet Margarine Packaging on September 13, 2012 at 6:01 PM · Report this
lark 36
Good on you Mayor McGinn for participating on SLOG.
Posted by lark on September 13, 2012 at 6:20 PM · Report this
37
Quick! Someone check the I.P. logs on City Hall's computer network! Mikey's staff has been posting here again.
Posted by Mister G on September 13, 2012 at 6:41 PM · Report this
38
Perhaps it's time to reassess the need for West Seattle. Those studies were done before the new arena was proposed and before they approved a few dozen new condo and apartment buildings for construction. If they're so concerned about traffic in sodo (and they should be) the solution with the biggest impact would be to get folks on to a train and off the roads. If they don't do something drastic sodo is going to be gridlocked with commuting west seattlites avoiding the tunnel and sports enthusiasts attending the hundreds (thousands?) of games.
Posted by Al Pastor on September 13, 2012 at 7:05 PM · Report this
seandr 39
@25: Burgess's aggressive panhandling bill was a symbolic effort to change public perception about public safety in Belltown and Pioneer Square. Both of those areas could have really used the help in order to stop the hemorrhaging of high-profile businesses to Capitol Hill and South Lake Union.

As for the SPD, they've basically make Mike "the hippy" McGinn their bitch, and as a result, the opportunity afforded by the DOJ was completely wasted. The city needs a politically savvy mayor with the brains and balls to outmaneuver the police union. Burgess might be the guy (in part because he understands how the SPD works), although I think Pete Holmes is a better bet.
Posted by seandr on September 13, 2012 at 10:19 PM · Report this
seandr 40
@25: "Sanitized for the wealthy"

Not quite. Really, the bill was about "sanitizing" Pioneer Square and Belltown for women so that they could feel safe. I don't know a single woman who enjoys being harassed on the street for money by drunk and/or mentally deranged men. As a result, many women won't go to Belltown or Pioneer square alone, and others avoid those places altogether.

But not you! You like your streets gritty and free of females!
Posted by seandr on September 13, 2012 at 10:33 PM · Report this
41
Is the • $2 million for a corridor analysis of a high-capacity transit line from downtown to University District, via Eastlake. If approved by the council, this work would begin next year.
the best use of money since the link lightrail is already going from Downtown to the U district?
Posted by Narb on September 14, 2012 at 9:21 AM · Report this
42
Is the -• $2 million for a corridor analysis of a high-capacity transit line from downtown to University District, via Eastlake. -the best use of money since the link light rail already is going to go from Downtown to the U District?
Posted by Narb on September 14, 2012 at 9:27 AM · Report this
43
"without getting stuck in traffic"

buses bikes and pedestrians cause most 'stuck in traffic' situations - that and people that don't merge to the last minute. Oh and rich people in their sailboats going under the canal bridges at rush hour. From my observation these are most likely the same people that step off into traffic without looking and ride their bikes up the middle of a row of cars while screaming like an illiterate lobotomy patient "3 FEET 3 FEET!!"

So yes yes yes please ignore all of us addicted to fossil fuel air ruining jerks that are usually waiting for bikes and pedestrians playing out in the street and at bridges and build a bike path instead. And yeah spend half a million for a few asshats to look at the site and draw up a plan. Then ignore your neighbor when they walk past you and give a nice full on Seattle Freeze while tweeting about food trucks and how "you're such a foodie" Ciao!
Posted by BeastfromtheEast on September 14, 2012 at 10:24 AM · Report this
44
22, I couldn't agree more. I grew up in Cleveland and now I live in Seattle. TRUST ME people of Seattle, the political world here is heaven compared to that in Cleveland.

Cleveland has completely fallen off the map because for decades, the city politicians and industrial tycoons abused its greatest amenity (the lakefront) for steel production. Now the city is left with hundreds of acres of polluted land, a horrible economy, and the frustration that none of the political leaders of the past had the foresight to consider what sort of implications their actions would have on the future.

There is a lot of building going on right now in Seattle and I know that can be scary to tax payers, but this sort of building is the kind of stuff that will make Seattle a world competitor in the future. When other cities are building highways and parking lots, Seattle is prioritizing rail, public parks, and bicycle infrastructure. There has been a major cultural shift happening in the last few years and ignoring that would go completely against what Seattle is all about. Gas is too expensive, people like to ride bikes, young people are flocking to cities. All of these things are translating into more people-oriented cities as opposed to a car-oriented cities. Mcginn has embraced this notion and Seattle will be better in the long run for it.

Posted by db206 on September 14, 2012 at 10:34 AM · Report this
45
Narb - there are plenty of people who'd like to stop at points between downtown and the U District which aren't Capitol Hill (the one station on the light rail line).

That said, I'd argue that route should be lower priority than other efforts. I am not a fan of the at-grade streetcar solution from downtown-Fremont-Ballard, and I think a bridge across the ship canal is going to be expensive (even if it's pedestrian/bicycle/transit only) and require ongoing operations costs (I can't see how you can do it without it being a drawbridge, requiring an operator). But I can't see how you provide anything remotely close to reasonably on-time service without a new bridge; the Fremont Bridge makes life difficult for the existing Metro service.

I'm also vehemently not a fan of extending BRT all the way to Madison Park. As someone noted above, the #11 is usually pretty close to empty once it passes Madison Valley, particularly at off-peak hours. Plus, I am suspecting the BRT solution will have to be electric trolley bus service, and I can't see Madison Park wanting overhead wire back when they fought so hard to get rid of it in the first place.
Posted by TransitUser on September 14, 2012 at 11:02 AM · Report this
kitschnsync 46
saendr @40: Really, the bill was about "sanitizing" Pioneer Square and Belltown for women so that they could feel safe.

Huh? That's a very, very narrow interpretation of the bill's intents. Burgess never framed the intent of the bill that way. It seems you are inventing a straw man.

You like your streets gritty and free of females!

Oh, I see. You're trolling me. Good luck with that.
Posted by kitschnsync on September 14, 2012 at 11:27 AM · Report this
47
To build the eastlake light rail you'd probably have to remove parking and/or mess up a major cycling commuter route.

"Major cycling commuter route." Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!!
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 12:10 PM · Report this
48
Completely agree with #2 here. West Seattle is a virtual island, when the bridge is out, the busses are stuck just like a car. So not sure how we think Rapid Ride will solve for our transit issues. Rail would be the way to go. Is it simply a technical issue? Or a perceived demand issue?
Posted by OnGraham on September 14, 2012 at 12:11 PM · Report this
49
Could we stop talking about Cleveland now? Frankly, no one cares except for the two people who used to live there.
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 12:12 PM · Report this
50
There has been a major cultural shift happening in the last few years and ignoring that would go completely against what Seattle is all about. Gas is too expensive, people like to ride bikes, young people are flocking to cities. All of these things are translating into more people-oriented cities as opposed to a car-oriented cities. Mcginn has embraced this notion and Seattle will be better in the long run for it.

If any of this is true, why has the percentage of people in Seattle who own cars not changed in 10 years, and why do more people own three cars than own none? And why is McGinn, the lying shithead, the least popular Seattle mayor in several decades?
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 12:16 PM · Report this
51
What it is about rail, a technology that's nearly 200 years old, that makes the hipsters think it's so "future oriented," anyway?
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 12:18 PM · Report this
52
McGinn is unpopular because Seattle's vile business associations resent his agenda of pro-transit, and because Seattle's over-educated psuedo-progressives are easily fooled into believing that Seattle transportation planners have any intention to build effective transit service nor design streets to manage traffic safely. The money trail always leads to automobile-related business interests who have created and will maintain the automobile dependency as a cash cow. They find amusement watching people suffer and die.
McGinn has been overwhelmed by Seattle's vile business associations.
Posted by Wells on September 14, 2012 at 1:13 PM · Report this
53
Oh silly Mister G,

The point is that if you're so fed up with progressive infrastructure and politics maybe you should move to a city like Cleveland where you'll have ACTUAL political corruption and all the road you want for your "3 cars". If you do live in Seattle, you're a lot luckier than most people and clearly you don't realize that.

Posted by db206 on September 14, 2012 at 1:19 PM · Report this
54
Gee, if you don't like Cleveland you can move to Somalia. Which, by the way, I have no more interest in than I have in Cleveland. Why the fuck do you keep talking about Cleveland? Who gives a shit about Cleveland? If you're trying to convince us that Cleveland is a shithole, consider us convinced.
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 1:35 PM · Report this
55
I'm confused. Why duplicate the Link Light rail line from downtown to the U district? Technology gives us the possibility of building a 21st century transit system. See http://www.qi2.com/index.php/transportat…
Posted by Tyler Folsom on September 14, 2012 at 1:59 PM · Report this
56
Oh I'm not trying to convince you of anything that would obviously a lost cause. I'm simply saying that you sound like a spoiled baby complaining about how awful things are in one of the most privileged cities in the country.

And this has nothing to do with Somolia, last I checked. I didn't like Cleveland so I moved to Seattle where the people like me outnumber the people like you.
Posted by db206 on September 14, 2012 at 2:02 PM · Report this
57
We'll see who outnumbers whom when the corrupt shithead you love so much stands for re-election.
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 2:10 PM · Report this
58
West Seattle to Ballard though downtown was the HIGHEST capacity route, which is why the monorail folks sought to build that first. MLK to Northgate was second. Which is why Light rail went there. You would have to build a separate light rail bridge to West Seattle and that would be expensive but probably not as expensive as all of the productivity lost and gas burned while sitting in traffic on mind-bogglingly stupid highway design (1 lane exit for West Seattle AND Beacon Hill? who was the genius who thought that was a good idea?)
Posted by Jamiea on September 14, 2012 at 2:25 PM · Report this
59
How about drilling a bicycle tunnel from West Seattle to Ballard? If we can pay a billionaire and his bondholders $350 million for a new basketball arena, we can afford that tunnel.
Posted by Mister G on September 14, 2012 at 2:49 PM · Report this
DM1 60
I agree. What about adding a bicycle lane to the Monorail? I feel like those bike riders are really being disenfranchised because they can't ride 200 feet above street level. And the nice thing is they won't have to avoid pedestrians at that elevation!
Posted by DM1 on September 16, 2012 at 9:51 AM · Report this
61
By the way, you know where the shithead got that $5 million? From the libraries. This is what happens when you approve a dedicated tax levy. Of course, The Stranger's readers are mainly renters who actually don't think they pay property taxes.
Posted by Mister G on September 17, 2012 at 7:54 PM · Report this
62
Buss transit and bike routs are great. I am all for alternative means of transport for students, politicians, yuppies and unemployed hipsters, but last I checked Seattle transit will not allow me to load 10 foot copper pipe, 4x8 plywood, drywall, lumber and most of my power tools onboard. I suppose I could load all these needed items on a bike trailer and ride up Boren avenue during rush hour.
I live and work in Seattle, just saying.
I will not vote for Bike McShwin again.
Posted by grantf on January 18, 2013 at 7:46 PM · Report this
63
To Mister G,
Renters vote for levies, then there landlord raises there rent and they bitch about it.
Posted by grantf on January 18, 2013 at 7:57 PM · Report this

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