It's the Closeness of the Race, Not the Speed of the Tally, That Makes Ballot Counting Look Slow

Comments

1
The real irony is as the vote count closes, Rmoney is almost exactly at...wait for it... 47%! Yes, that and he won the red taker states. It was himself he's been talking nasty about!
2
It's "substantial" - not "substantive"
3
I think that for a couple of King County Superior Court judges, the ballot counting is agonizingly slow.
4
@2 Whatever. You try quickly hobbling together an early morning post before your first cup of caffeine has kicked in.
5
@4:

Surely you mean "cobbling", not "hobbling".

Have another cup of tea, Goldy.
6
OK, point taken, G. But still, I want to see something implemented wherein we know the winner of a close race (and there are a lot of them in Washington) in a matter of hours - not weeks. I mean it seemingly happens every election cycle. We don't know who the governor-elect is or who the senator-elect is or who the new AG is for days and days and days.

What we really need is a national standardized system managed by an independent third-party like the League of Women Voters for instance.
7
@6:
We don't know who the governor-elect is or who the senator-elect is or who the new AG is for days and days and days.

Oh really? In 2012, we knew who was the Senator-elect long before the election; the ballots merely confirmed it. While the pundits may have rumbled for several days about a "too-close-to-call" gubernatorial race, those who actually looked at the numbers (e.g. Slog and HorsesAss) called it for Inslee on the day after the election ... based on the Election Day ballot totals. And the AG race was so over after the first ballot drop that no one even bothered to "call" it for Ferguson.

Besides, we know who won all races well before January. And really, all that matters is that the Chief Justice (or President of the Senate) swears in the correct person.