Don't miss the "multimedia brainsplosion" Before We Flew Like Birds We Flew Like Clouds, in which choreographer KT Niehoff and collaborators convey the experiences of four different people in a state of extreme duress, including (as pictured) an astronaut blasting off and floating in space. BLAVKA PHOTOGRAPHY

Our music critics have already chosen the 32 best concerts this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn to pick the best events in their areas of expertise. Here are their picks in every genre—from the Seattle Jewish Film Festival to the 7th annual Plate of Nations, from the Poetry Brothel to SAM Remix, and from Fringe Festival and Moisture Festival to Patton Oswalt and Marc Maron. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.


Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

ART

Derelict, you're not coming back, I mean that in the nicest way
Gretchen Frances Bennett's work has been displayed at galleries all around Seattle, won special recognition (and cash!) from the Seattle Art Museum, and earned her a spot on the 2010 Stranger Genius Award short lists. In 2008, Jen Graves wrote: "Everything that Gretchen Bennett makes is a sort of humbled afterlife of something else, usually something geographic: cut street stickers arranged to represent images of her old neighborhood in Brooklyn; labels from used-up water bottles reassembled and mounted pristinely on paper in the shape of Mount Rainier; and now, colored-pencil portraits of YouTube videos that revolve around a dead man, Kurt Cobain." See what she's been up to recently at this one-night-only exhibit, presented as part of the Vignettes series.

Herzog Reading Night
Meg Hartwig and Dakota Gearhart will lead this interactive reading night, as part of the programming for SOIL's exhibit about the "obscenity of the jungle." Bring your favorite Werner Herzog passage.

FOOD & DRINK

Opus Co. Pop Up
Get a sneak peek at Opus Co., a new restaurant opening in Seattle this spring that promises "imaginative, seasonal fare cooked over a wood fire" (including lots of vegetables as well as whole pigs and lambs). This pop-up will offer a preview, so come check it out now so you can say you knew them when.

READINGS & TALKS

Camille Paglia
Author and professor Camille Paglia (known for her cultural, social, and artistic critiques) will offer nuggets of wisdom from her new collection, Free Women, Free Men: Sex, Gender, Feminism, which contains decades of essays in which, according to Publisher's Weekly, Paglia "is at her feisty, full-throated best."

Suja Thomas: The Missing American Jury
Suja A. Thomas (professor of law at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is a constitutional originalist who has written (and been quoted in) numerous articles on topics including the role of private interests in determining jury processes, the incorporation of the Bill of Rights, and the jurisdiction of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Hear her read from her new book, The Missing American Jury: Restoring the Fundamental Constitutional Role of the Criminal, Civil, and Grand Juries, which examines the way in which juries have been slowly stripped of their constitutional powers—and how those powers can be restored.

MONDAY-TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

National Geographic Live: Beauty and the Bizarre
Anand Varma is a science photographer who has created fascinating, gory, and sometimes gross photographs of nature scenes, including many close-ups of bugs living and dying. Hear him speak about his work at this talk presented by National Geographic.

MONDAY-THURSDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Dine Around Seattle
During Dine Around Seattle (not to be confused with Seattle Restaurant Week), restaurants throughout the area are serving three-course dinner menus for just $33 or $44, with some also offering a three-course lunch for $18. Even better: When you make reservations online through dinearoundseattle.org, a donation is made to the Rainier Valley Food Bank, which serves roughly 12,000 people every month from its tiny 1,200-square-foot facility on Rainier Avenue. ANGELA GARBES

MONDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Macbett
Macbett is one of French avant-garde playwright Eugene Ionesco's more overlooked plays—get acquainted with it via this Ghost Light Theatricals production. It's a parody spin-off of Shakespeare's Macbeth, loosely inspired by the power-grabs, rebellion, guilt, and murder in the original.
There will not be performances on Tuesday or Wednesday.

TUESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

Howard French: Everything Under the Heavens
Writer and photographer Howard French (a former New York Times Asia correspondent, and author of China's Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa) will share his latest work, Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power. This book investigates China's ideological stance on foreign affairs, contextualizing their current status within a historical framework and comparing China's philosophy to their actual policies and actions.

Jonathan Rosenblum and Steve Early: Beyond $15 and Refinery Town
Explore labor issues with Jonathan Rosenblum (Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money, and the Remaking of an American City), Steve Early (Beyond $15: Immigrant Workers, Faith Activists, and the Revival of the Labor Movement), and secretary treasurer of the Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO, Lynne Dodson.

Matt Ruff and Nisi Shawl
Novelist Matt Ruff will celebrate the paperback release of his book Lovecraft Country, a story about Jim Crow America in the 1950s that blends the real-life horrors of racism with eerie science fiction. He will be joined by Nisi Shawl, author of Everfair: an acclaimed work of speculative history that imagines an alternative history of the Congo, wherein a utopian land bought from King Leopold II attracts native populations of the Congo and escaped slaves from around the world.

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY

FILM

Beau Travail
Beauty is a dangerous thing. Not because, as we are often told, it is superficial or deceptive or skin deep—nor for any of the other tepid half-truths we admire because they flatter our own awareness of how far from beautiful most of us are. It's dangerous because it is so easy to surrender to, because devotion to beauty can so easily become an obsession. Which is to say, beauty is harmful not in itself but for what it spawns in others. French director Claire Denis understands this fact. And her greatest examination of beauty is Beau Travail, which she made in 1999. It is also, of course, her most beautiful film. BRUCE REID

TUESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

John Grade: North
Before this exhibit closes this week, see sculpture, etchings, and drawings by John Grade, the artist whose enormous reconstruction of an old-growth tree was installed in Seattle Art Museum's main lobby in February. At more than 80 feet long, it soars through the air; here, you'll see his smaller, more delicate works.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

A Closer Look
A Closer Look, which closes this week, gathers portraits from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection by Paul Gauguin, Pieter Hugo, Dennis Hopper, Arnold Newman, Ernest Bachrach, László Willinger, Francis Bacon, Guy Tillim, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Ansel Adams, David Hockney, and Georges Seurat.

PERFORMANCE

Dry Powder
Charles Isherwood's review of Dry Powder for the New York Times begins, "Calling all Bernie Sanders fans," so this was an appropriate choice by the Rep for Seattle audiences. Dry Powder, written by first-time playwright Sarah Burgess, skewers the world of high finance with humor and gusto. Directed by Marya Sea Kaminski.
There will be no performance on Thursday.

Tribes
Nina Raine's Tribes is about a Jewish family that loves to banter and quibble. Their routine consists of lamenting, shouting, complaining, and exclaiming, at and around each other, all day long. Each of the family members has settled into this pattern—even Billy, although the family's style of communication often leaves him isolated. Billy is deaf and reads lips; he doesn't know sign language. That changes when he meets a girl who's losing her hearing...and the family dynamic changes too. The play raises a lot of interesting questions about disability and belonging, while offering seemingly effortless humor and playful intellectualism.

WEDNESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Fifth Anniversary Party
Headed by Ian Roberts (a founder of Seattle Beer Week and former bar manager at Brouwer’s), the Pine Box enlivens its gorgeous mortuary setting with more than 30 beers on tap, and offers a great (loud, lively, fun) beer hall setting. Celebrate five years of the venue at this anniversary party featuring a new addition to their "Nail in the Coffin" beer series.

QUEER

Leather Daddy's Tag Sale
There's no telling what straps and devices you might find at the world's smuttiest tag sale. As Leather Pride Week whips itself into high gear, various local leatherati have donated some of their finest items for this charity tag sale. The benefactors of their largesse are the Leather Archives and Museum, but also you if you can snag some new gear at a great price. Last year, they raised $5,000 from the sale of various toys, books, rubber gizmos, and leather objets du rapports. If you have a toy or two to contribute, drop ’em off at Doghouse Leathers. Cleaned, please. MATT BAUME

READINGS & TALKS

Ganesh Sitaraman with Paul Constant
Hear about income inequality in the context of our Constitution (and the fact that it "made no provisions to prevent the upper class from seizing the levers of power, as other constitutions had") from Vanderbilt associate professor of law, Ganesh Sitaraman. Sitaraman has also served as an advisor to a Democratic hero, Senator Elizabeth Warren. He will be joined by Seattle Review of Books co-founder and former Stranger staffer Paul Constant.

Lit Fix 17: Four Year Anniversary
Combat the dark days of winter with the latest Lit Fix—Seattle's "dive-friendliest" reading and music series, which brings together books, bars, and bands all in one place. This edition will feature Kathleen Alcalá, Quentin Baker, Robert Lashley, Laurie Frankel, and Brian McGuigan.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Moisture Festival
The Moisture Festival unites a vast kaleidoscope of burlesque and variété performers at Hale's Palladium and Broadway Performance Hall. Whomever you fancy—clowns, comedians, tightwire artists, aerialists, jugglers, singers—you can find someone who's traveled from regions as far flung as Basque France or Wallingford to perform for you. The festival promises a variety of special performances and workshops, as well as performances of shows including their Varietè spectacular (with matinee as well as late-night editions) and the Libertease Cabaret. See a list of special events (including workshops, lectures, and a burlesque cruise) here.

THURSDAY

ART

Complex Exchange
The "Complex Exchange" series brings together Seattle artists, leaders, and community members to discuss themes in art exhibits currently on display. This edition will focus on two installations: Jacob Lawrence's 60 panel masterpiece, The Migration Series, currently on display at the Seattle Art Museum, and Inye Wokoma's exploration of ancestry, identity, and displacement, An Elegant Utility, at the Northwest African American Museum.

FILM

Family Circle: The Films of Yasujiro Ozu
The films in SAM's tribute to one of the three masters of Japan's Golden Age of film, Yasujiro Ozu, are all beautiful and have at their core the quiet spirit of their times and places—mid-century, post-war Japan. The series begins with Late Spring, which doesn't have much action in it but presents the kind of stillness that only a highly refined sense of one's culture can achieve; and ends with An Autumn Afternoon, which is a little more lively and has one of the best bar scenes in the history of cinema. CHARLES MUDEDE

PERFORMANCE

Beer & Ballet
Tickets to Pacific Northwest Ballet's Director's Choice (Rich Smith describes it as "Peter Boal's spring breeze of ballets, specially selected to show off innovative new work and modern-era classics that could stand another look") will normally cost you $30-$187—but on this Thursday, floor seats are just $29. It's a perfect chance to try out ballet if you'd never normally attend, and you have a great excuse to drink with the special deals they're offering on rosé and Fremont Brewing Interurban IPA.

READINGS & TALKS

Cocktails & Crime
This event is inspired by the literature-based exhibition Swedish Crime Scenes and will feature a screening of murder-filled movie The Sea Gives, the Sea Takes (based on the book by Camilla Läckberg) as well as light refreshments and, of course, cocktails at the no-host bar.

Isaac Marion: The Burning World
Isaac Marion authored the best-selling zombie romance novel Warm Bodies, which was noticed for telling an apocalyptic story from the perspective of one of the zombies, and adapted into a popular film with the same title. Celebrate the release of his newest work, The Burning World (another installment in the Warm Bodies series). You can also see him at Third Place Books in Lake Forest Park on Saturday.

Jami Attenberg with Maria Semple
Jami Attenberg (journalist and author of The Kept Man, The Melting Season, Saint Mazie, and New York Times best seller The Middlesteins) will share her new novel, All Grown Up, a book that investigates what it means to be an adult and how we measure growth (especially in times of stress and heartbreak). Attenberg will be joined by the wonderful Maria Semple, who Christopher Frizzelle calls "the author of the funniest book ever written about Seattle" (Where'd You Go, Bernadette?).

Kristie Middleton
Kristie Middleton (senior food policy director for The Humane Society of the United States) will visit to offer wisdom from her new book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live—One Meal at a Time, an inspirational guide to eating fewer animal products and reducing your environmental impact.

The Poetry Brothel
This event will create a turn-of-the-century bordello-style atmosphere in which audience members can enjoy a series of public readings (as well as performances ranging from music to burlesque dance to fortune telling). The major twist: you can also pay self-proclaimed "poetry whores" to read to you privately. The sex work analogy and the use of the word "whore" won't sit well with everyone, but they're trying to make a point about intimacy and personal connection in art. Alexandra Villarreal of Observer wrote "rather than meeting its demise like many a whorehouse in the past, the Poetry Brothel has become a think tank for art, growth, discovery, and wonder. It gives the mind a refuge, a place to reflect and create. But most of all, it throws one hell of a bash."

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

COMEDY

Vir Das
Extremely popular Bollywood comedian and actor Vir Das (who has appeared in films including BadMaash Company, Delhi Belly, and Revolver Rani, and has performed stand-up comedy all over the world) will come to Bellevue for the weekend.

PERFORMANCE

26 Miles
26 Miles is written by playwright and composer Quiara Aolegria Hudes, who wrote the book for Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical In the Heights and won a Pulitzer Prize for Drama for her play Water by the Spoonful. The plot centers on an estranged mother and daughter who take an impromptu road trip to Yellowstone, and deals with themes of Cuban-American identity, broken families, and the American landscape. Directed by Julie Beckman.

Milk Like Sugar
Kirsten Greenidge's Milk Like Sugar (winner of the 2012 Obie Award for Playwriting) is a chatty, breezy, sociological take on teenage life, teenage pregnancy, and multigenerational poverty.

Yankee Pickney
This is the Seattle premiere of Yankee Pickney, a one-woman show written and performed by Jehan Osanyin and directed by Jimmy Shields. It's about a young West Indian woman navigating culture and identity—stuck outside both African American and white American communities—and "spinning a tale that stretches back centuries yet is as contemporary as today's headlines."

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

Director's Choice
Director's Choice is Pacific Northwest Ballet artistic director Peter Boal's spring breeze of ballets, specially selected to show off innovative new work and modern-era classics that could stand another look. This year, the stage will blacken with David Dawson's sharp and agressive Empire Noir, then yield to the slo-mo, geometric entanglements of William Forsythe's duet-heavy New Suite, and then burst into color with Jessica Lang's Her Door to the Sky, which looks like a Georgia O'Keeffe painting come alive. RICH SMITH

Grounded
There are plenty of plays about unexpected pregnancy—but this one, by George Brant (Elephant's Graveyard) shows the unique consequences for a star fighter pilot. She can no longer take to the sky, so now she sits in a trailer and operates drones. Timely and inquisitive, Grounded is an empathetic play (with slightly less political punch than you might expect). This production will be directed by Kelly Kitchens.

How I Learned to Be a Particular Kind of Lady
The Lady B describes herself as "Seattle’s Première TransFabulous, Femtastic, Draglesquing, Sass-Mouthing Negro.” Using an equally complex and fabulous mélange of storytelling tools (film, modern dance, spoken word, burlesque, “and the sacred art of twerking for social justice”), she’ll tell you the tale of how she emerged into “the Lady Bold, the Lady Beautiful, the Lady B.” RICH SMITH

Seattle Fringe Festival
Five years after its re-launch, Seattle Fringe is back with two weekends of surprisingly good/bad, offbeat theatrical performances. This ain't the Rep. This is where the new, raw, just-bubbled-up stuff is, which can be exciting! I'm pumped to check out Sara Porkalob's Dragonbaby, Dacha Theatre's Shakespeare Dice, Jeffrey Robert's The Gay Uncle Explains It All To You, Arson Nicki + Friends' “Fringe Fest is Such a Drag," Squatch Tanztheater's Hey, I'm Average., Michael Washington Brown's BLACK!, and Troy Mink's The Midway Liar. RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

ART

An Art Show on How Not to Have an Art Show
This is sort of an art show, but not really—it's more of a cautionary tale/meta experiment created by Krista Lee Wolfe. You'll have to attend to find out more, but draws include food, art installations, a musical drama by Wolfe, and musical performances by "looper pedal-based melodic alternative" Beakers Basement and "free form space rock band" a.frequency.

The Life, Times & Comics of Rube Goldberg
In honor of the exhibit The Art of Rube Goldberg currently on display at MoPOP, cartoonist, author, and comics historian Paul C. Tumey (Screwball Comics) will speak about the Goldberg's life and work, including his longtime career as a cartoonist.

SAM Remix
SAM Remix is a recurring and ever-changing art party that includes performances, tours, and dancing.

COMEDY

Patton Oswalt
The supposed renaissance in stand-up comedy, much like the putative platinum age of television, usually means only one thing: more people making more stuff you don’t have time to watch. However, when two veteran artisans of the stand-up form come to town in the same week, it’s worth a little extra effort. Patton Oswalt and Marc Maron are contemporaries whose styles are pretty different, but they are united by a caustic generational sensibility that used to be unfashionable to notice. They also both made their showbiz names by doing stuff that isn’t stand-up—Oswalt by acting, and Maron by creating and hosting the podcast WTF. But their loyalty to the form after more than 25 years gives their stage work a gravity that comes only from seeing a craft performed with love and confidence. SEAN NELSON

READINGS & TALKS

Elif Batuman: The Idiot
New Yorker staff writer and author Elif Batuman (The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them) will share her debut novel, The Idiot, which Kirkus Reviews called "self-aware, cerebral, and delightful."

Misty Copeland
Misty Copeland is the first African American woman to be a principal dancer at the prestigious American Ballet Theatre, and she has grabbed the hearts of dance critics, the internet, and pretty much anyone who watches her perform. At this event, hear her speak about privilege and art.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Black Like Me: An Exploration of the Word N****r
This multidisciplinary piece featuring dance, mixed media, and sound design asks whether it's possible for the black community to redeem a word that has been—and still is—used as an expression of hate and contempt, but has found more benign uses in hip hop and other contexts. Presented by Jade Solomon Curtis.

READINGS & TALKS

Citizen University Annual National Conference
Rather poignantly, the theme of this year's Citizen University—a gathering of speakers, teachers, and civic activists—will be "Reckoning and Repair." Join them for workshops and talks on the state of the country and how to be involved. This year's speakers: Alice Waters, Annette Gordon-Reed, Bob Woodson, Berto Aguayo, Brad Jenkins, Brittany Packnett, Carrie Mae Weems, Felicia Wong, Heather McGhee, Jim Wallis, Jose Antonio Vargas, Krista Tippett, Matthew Dowd, Maria Hinojosa, Matt Kibbe, Rajiv Chandrasekaran, Rinku Sen, Ruben Navarrette, and Titus Kaphar.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

7th Annual Plate of Nations
Plate of Nations is your two-week-long chance to explore the many cuisines and cultures of the Rainier Valley. Until April 9, 11 independently owned eateries serving Ethiopian, Eritrean, Laotian, Middle Eastern, Somali, Thai, or Vietnamese (or, in the case of Olympic Express restaurant, a wondrous halal mash-up of all nearly all of these things) food are offering shareable plates, specially priced at $15 and $25. If you’ve never been to Cafe Ibex, Huarachitos, or Rainier BBQ, you’re missing out on some of the best food in town. South Seattle is where it’s at. Catch up. ANGELA GARBES

PERFORMANCE

Dina Martina: Fine Avec Me
The verbal begarblement/drag performance artist Dina Martina will return with video, nonsensical songs, and extraordinarily funny if meandering stories with Fine Avec Me. We're no stranger (:-/) to Dina; our contributor David Schmader called her—admiringly— "a singer who cannot sing, a dancer who cannot dance, and a storyteller who seems to have situational brain damage." She also won a Genius Award in 2012. And she was on our cover once. Do we have a crush?

Made in Seattle: KT Niehoff
The child inside you will flip out at the sight of big helium balloons floating around the black-box theater inside 12th Avenue Arts, where choreographer KT Niehoff and approximately seven million collaborators are staging this multimedia brainsplosion called Before We Flew Like Birds We Flew Like Clouds. Using dance, short virtual-reality films, sound recordings of Radiolab-like interviews, and music, Niehoff and her deep bench of artists endeavor to convey the experiences of four different people in a state of extreme duress: a speed skater in the middle of a superfast turn, an astronaut blasting off and floating in space, a paraplegic rower rowing, and a heart-attack survivor seconds before (and after!) death. It's a lot to look at, but it's all good, and did I mention the room full of heart-lifting balloons?! RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

COMEDY

Marc Maron: The Too Real Tour
The supposed renaissance in stand-up comedy, much like the putative platinum age of television, usually means only one thing: more people making more stuff you don’t have time to watch. However, when two veteran artisans of the stand-up form come to town in the same week, it’s worth a little extra effort. Patton Oswalt and Marc Maron are contemporaries whose styles are pretty different, but they are united by a caustic generational sensibility that used to be unfashionable to notice. They also both made their showbiz names by doing stuff that isn’t stand-up—Oswalt by acting, and Maron by creating and hosting the podcast WTF. But their loyalty to the form after more than 25 years gives their stage work a gravity that comes only from seeing a craft performed with love and confidence. SEAN NELSON

COMMUNITY

Talk of the Town 2017
Talk of the Town, Town Hall's annual fundraiser, promises a cocktail party, a dinner catered by local chefs, and performances by writer Chinaka Hodge (creator of the viral video "What will you tell your daughters about 2016?"), drag superstar BenDeLaCreme, and former Stranger staffer, Stranger Genius Award winner, Shrill author, and hilarious human Lindy West. Tickets for the dinner are sold out, but there are still $50 tickets available for the "Distilled" cocktail party portion of the evening, which Lindy West and Chinaka Hodge will attend.

FOOD & DRINK

12th Anniversary Party & Orval Day Celebration
The 12th anniversary party for Brouwer's Cafe coincides with Orval Day, when you can celebrate the (only variety of) beer sold by legendary Notre Dame d'Orval Monastary. If you haven't tried it, here's your chance. And if you're not interested, just focus on the anniversary beer (a Black Raspberry Sour) created by Brouwer's in partnership with Holy Mountain.

Georgetown Bites
Georgetown likes to front like it's all industrial and hardscrabble and people only eat diner food and drink cheap beer, but if you've been there recently, you know that's only half true these days. While you can certainly get your greasy hash browns at Square Knot before heading next door to slam Rainier tall cans at 9lb. Hammer, you can also get a whole cornucopia of culinary delights. There's the all-cask beer at Machine House, the high-end chocolates at Fran's, and the K Vintners viognier at Charles Shaw, to name a few. Indeed, Georgetown—while it may be home to the Dead Baby Downhill after-party, which features bike jousting, a thousand drunk punks, and yours truly bleeding all over a makeshift plywood skateboard ramp—is also home to two Matt Dillon restaurants. The Georgetown Bites festival offers you a chance to sample the neighborhood's more white-collar fare at working-class prices. Two of El Sirenito's deliciously deep-fried fish tacos for $5? Yes, please! TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

READINGS & TALKS

Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science
Celebrity chef Alton Brown (who was in town a few months ago promoting his book EveryDayCook, which features 101 recipes sorted by time of day) will host a live show that blends science, music, "talk-show antics," interactive elements, games, multimedia presentation aids, and "potentially dangerous" food demonstrations for a performance that highlights stunts he has "never been allowed to do on TV."

Ezequiel García: Growing Up in Public
Growing Up in Public is the American debut of Argentinian cartoonist Ezequiel García, and offers similarities between the uncertainty of the artist's life and the uncertain political and social future of Buenos Aires. The graphic memoir is said to be inspired by physical and cultural changes in the city, as well as "film, architecture, and rock music of the past."

Peter Bagge: Fire!!
In 2015, Paul Constant wrote that "Peter Bagge has been at the comics game long enough that he could probably retire into a rewarding (but poor-paying) career as Seattle's elder comics statesman." Celebrate Bagge's statesman status while you check out his latest work, a biography titled Fire!!: The Zora Neale Hurston Story. Hurston had a fascinating life, full of travels and cultural investigations, and created an enthralling body of work, from her controversial anthropological pieces to her classic novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Seattle Jewish Film Festival
The 22nd annual Seattle Jewish Film Festival is a nine-day cinematic exploration and celebration of Jewish life around the globe. They promise dozens of Jewish and Israeli films from countries including France, the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, Turkey, and Poland, along with exciting guests, a VIP Gala, opening and closing night parties, and the rest of the usual film festival draws. (Less standard offerings include a Matzoh Momma Sunday Brunch, complete with Klezmer music.)

SUNDAY

FILM

SHRIEK: The Wicker Man + Happy Hour Heckling
Shriek is a recurring film class about women in horror (taught by Evan J. Peterson and Heather Marie Bartels) that features screenings as well as engaged, thoughtful, and hilarious discussions. Today, they'll follow up their March 12th screening of the 1973 version of The Wicker Man with a "Heckle Night" screening of the 2006 version. When it came out, Lindy West wrote this about the remake: "Obscene anti-feminist propaganda that it is, The Wicker Man is almost too retarded to be offensive. The women are mysterious and tricky and beguiling, like evil vaginas. Malus is strong and thrusty and straightforward, like a hero-penis."

FOOD & DRINK

Women in Food, Drink, & Leadership
Celebrate women's contributions to the cuisine and beverage trade and shell out some dough for the Women's Funding Alliance. Hobnob with the leaders of Sip Northwest magazine, Anna Schafer Cohen of àMaurice Cellars, Nancy Bishop from Alpenfire Cider, Leah Jorgenson of the eponymous cellar, and Deb Taylor and Nicole Matson of Staple and Fancy. Dishes in the four-plus course meal will include Dungeness crab, bone-in ribeye with duck fat potatoes, and rhubarb and blackberry tart with salted caramel sauce—all paired with wines and ciders.

PERFORMANCE

Haters Roast: The Shady Tour
Eight delightfully venomous queens from RuPaul's Drag Race will wield their tongues against choice targets like politics, media, and each other. Super Fan tickets are available for those who wish to meet the royalty and watch them from front- (or second-)row seats.

Shaping Sound
Dancer and choreographer Travis Wall is best known for his contributions to So You Think You Can Dance (as both a contestant and a choreographer). See his new collaboration with Shaping Sound dance company, After the Curtain. Broadway World writes that the story is about "a man fighting to find his creative voice after the death of his one true love."

READINGS & TALKS

Geoffrey Nutter: Cities at Dawn
Poet and educator Geoffrey Nutter (author of collections A Summer Evening, Water's Leaves & Other Poems, Christopher Sunset, and The Rose of January) will read from his latest work, Cities at Dawn. Adam Fitzgerald of The American Reader writes that the material in this collection "obeys the abstract logic at the heart of descriptive writing: the sweet ease of writing’s intangibility, its virtual tease."

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