The Frye continues its outstanding track record of programming multimedia investigations of identity, tradition, and history with Alison Marks's first solo museum exhibition, One Gray Hair, opening this weekend. Courtesy of Frye Art Museum

Our music critics have already chosen the 35 best concerts this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from the Pacific Northwest Ballet's Her Story to Cinema Italian Style, and from the Northwest Chocolate Festival to a conversation with Marc Maron about his new book. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.


Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Little Fish Dinner Series
Zoi Antonitsas is a civic treasure. In addition to being an amazing, award-winning chef who has a really good handle on what "Northwest cuisine" actually means, she seems to bring fun times and a festive atmosphere wherever she goes. The first time I met her, at her house in Mount Baker, she opened a ludicrous amount of muscadet and we all threw a dinner party for her dog, replete with those miniature crystal wine glasses and tiny implements. I don't think he ate whatever it was we were trying to get him to eat, but if you go to this pop-up hype tour Zoi and Bryan Jarr are throwing for their upcoming MarketFront restaurant Little Fish, you will eat all the things. Things like smoked herring pâté, mussels in rosé, and even cannabis-leaf custard. That custard is fitting, as the last time I saw her, she pulled out a fancy case full of CO2 cartridges and smoked everyone under the table. TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

PERFORMANCE

Bard In A Bar: Love's Labours Lost
Shakespeare would no doubt approve of Bard in a Bar: rowdy, crowdsourced, and boozy presentations of the well-known classics. This one's Love's Labours Lost, another madcap comedy featuring "four bros who have sworn off women, four women on a camping trip, and a fantastical Spaniard."

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY

PERFORMANCE

DEERS
What if Cheers were about a bunch of drunk animals instead of drunk humans? This play (written by Marcus Gorman and directed by Tootsie Spangles and Quiqui Dominguez) has all the answers.

MONDAY-SUNDAY

MUSIC

Earshot Jazz Festival
If you have any love for jazz in the Pacific Northwest, clear your schedule right now for the Earshot Jazz Festival. The nonprofit Earshot began life in 1984 and has presented 2,500 concerts since then, and the festival marks the yearly culmination of their programming. This year, it will feature more than 50 events in venues across the city, including "the contemporary giants of the art" (Brad Mehldau, Brian Blade, and Wycliffe Gordon), according to Charles Mudede, not to mention the avant-garde star Satoko Fuji and Greg Tate's Burnt Sugar Arkestra, which is "all about Miles Davis fusion period." What keeps Earshot so vital, year after year? "Jazz is an expanding universe," said festival executive director John Gilbreath to The Stranger's Dave Segal in 2014. "All directions. All of the time. In Seattle, as around the world. And that's the juice for this festival, presenting that momentum within the frame of this place, at this time."

TUESDAY

ART

Made in Puget Sound: An Evening with Underwater Photographer Drew Collins
Meet professional underwater photographer Drew Collins, who will show lovely images of Northwest giant Pacific octopus, wolf eels, sculpins, and more. Learn about the beauty and fragility of the Puget Sound and threats of pollution and overfishing.

FOOD & DRINK

Author Dinner with David Tanis
Join chef, writer, and New York Times columnist David Tanis in celebrating his new book, Market Cooking, with a talk and special dinner crafted by Chef John Sundstrom. Guests can enjoy appetizers (including Yarmuth Farm pork rillettes and Octopus a la plancha), wine, a three-course meal (including Oaxacan egg, chicken, and garlic soup, five spice duck breast with sesame parsnip mash, and Shaw Island quince tarte tatin), and a signed copy of the book.

READINGS & TALKS

Literary Luncheon Series: Nancy Pearl
Hear NPR books commentator Nancy Pearl discuss her new book George & Lizzie, about a married couple with two very different upbringings who find themselves at a crossroads when they realize they have completely different outlooks on love and marriage. Your ticket includes a copy of the book and a Mediterranean lunch from Vios Cafe.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

We Are the Ocean: An Indigenous Response to Climate Change
71% of the Earth's surface is covered with water, and our bodies are filled with it. Our health and survival depends on water, and yet our oceans are filled with plastic, our coral reefs are dying, and oil pipelines threaten to poison our rivers. Curated through a community process involving educators, artists, and indigenous communities, We Are the Ocean presents the work of artists who call the Pacific Ocean home. Through objects, installation, poetry, and oral histories, this exhibition engages with the history of climate change while providing a wealth of creative, philosophical, and spiritual insight for the future. EMILY POTHAST
Closing Sunday

PERFORMANCE

The Crucible
John Langs’s version of Arthur Miller’s fuck you to McCarthyism is powerful enough to blow the dust off a play as played out as The Crucible. This production is so good, it makes me want to use a bunch of clichéd theater-critic phrases like “Thrilling!” and “A delight!” and “I was on the edge of my seat!” or whatever I have to say to get you people off your asses and into the Falls Theatre at ACT to see this thing. Even at nearly three hours, the script feels trimmed and somehow muscular, and the story feels as urgent as it ever was, if for no other reason than for its implicit endorsement of the permissiveness of polyamory. There isn’t one weak link in the ensemble, and there’s only one or two very small directorial choices I question. But on the whole, this is the best show I’ve seen this season, and it’s hard to imagine topping it. RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY

FILM

Far Out Films
Headlight specifically chose six films meant to pair well with their high-potency cannabis. This week, get woozy with tricky timelines in Donnie Darko.

Wyeth Film Sprint
This showcase invites local filmmakers to create a short film inspired by Andrew Wyeth's paintings in a weeklong "sprint." Filmmakers have had one week to develop, create, and submit their short films for a panel of judges to review for Jury’s Pick and Wyeth’s Pick prizes, each worth $500. At the public screening today, there will be an additional Audience Pick award.

READINGS & TALKS

Castalia
Members of the University of Washington MFA program in creative writing, from graduate students to faculty to notable alumni, gather to share their work at this monthly event. The readers will be David Crouse, Sarah Destin, Chelsea Hernandez, Naima Kazmi, and Martha Silano.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Material Performance: Part II
The second phase of Emily Zimmerman's exhibition, showing work by Nola Avienne, Rebecca Farr, Leon Finley, Perry Hall, Jason Hirata, Amie McNeel, and many others, is designed to change over time in an investigation of kinesis, decay, and other processes.
Opening Wednesday

PERFORMANCE

Coriolanus: Fight Like a Bitch
The all-women cast of this infrequently produced Shakespearian tragedy stars Z Nation’s Nike Imoru, who showed off her ability to play King Lear and Lady Macbeth in her solo show Ode earlier this year. When she bellowed Lear's famous line, "Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!" I felt a desperate urge to see her take on a kingly role of classical proportions, and the theater gods (who are taking the form of Rebel Kat Productions) have granted me this wish. Straight from the audition materials: “What happens when we smash our current political, gendered landscape onto the sacrosanct canvas of one of the greatest playwrights ever? If a man can destroy an entire city… can’t a woman do the same? We say they can.” RICH SMITH

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Harold Hollingsworth at TASTE
Hollingsworth's work is reminiscent of the Seattle painter Ken Kelly, but the former's idiosyncratic vocabulary of images plays on the canvas in a simpler, more random way.
Opening Wednesday

PERFORMANCE

The Government Inspector
The richest tradition in Russian literature does not begin with Leo Tolstoy but with Nikolai Gogol. In the first half of the 19th century, Gogol formed the foundation of a tradition that includes Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Sasha Sokolov, and Tatyana Tolstaya with only three major works: a novel (Dead Souls), a novella (The Overcoat), and a play (The Government Inspector). The first work is one of the greatest things ever written in the universe that is known. The second is a masterpiece of Russian literature, and the third is just plain fun. The play involves a young man who is mistaken for a secret inspector by the corrupt officials of a small town. These officials do everything they can to please the young man. Wives and daughters are offered to him, and he accepts all of these gifts. Like Dead Souls and Overcoat, the humor in The Government Inspector is not bright or totally dark. It’s a humor that’s mezhdu sokakoi i volkom—between the dog and the wolf. This is the time of day when the shepherd can’t tell who is the friend and who is the enemy of his flock. This is the twilight time. CHARLES MUDEDE

Love, Chaos, and Dinner
Beloved circus/cabaret/comedy institution Teatro ZinZanni has returned to Seattle for a dinner theater production of Love, Chaos, and Dinner. They promise "the same stunning, velvet-laden, and iconic Belgian spiegeltent Seattleites will remember from Teatro ZinZanni’s former location on lower Queen Anne." The cast is led by first-time "Madame ZinZanni" Ariana Savalas, and features a duo on aerial trapeze, a magician, a "contortionist-puppet," a yodeling dominatrix, a hoop aerialist, and a Parisian acrobat.

Onerus
This dinner theater production will explore a San Junipero-style fantasy: a world in which people live out their lives virtually, with their brains connected to the cloud. The machines at onērus™ offer "100% organic dreams harvested from Deviants"—see what that might look like at this Cafe Nordo spectacular.

THURSDAY

ART

Betty Bowen Award Ceremony and Reception
The Betty Bowen Awards, which honor one Pacific Northwest artist every year with $15,000 and a ceremony, will bestow their laurels on Jono Vaughan, whose Project 42 involved dresses depicting Google Earth images from areas where trans people have been murdered. Deborah Lawrence and Kirk Yamahira will also receive the Kayla Skinner Special Recognition Award. Get acquainted with these artists' work and stay on after for refreshments.

Capitol Hill Art Walk
Every second Thursday, rain or shine, the streets of Capitol Hill are filled with tipsy art lovers checking out galleries and special events. If you like Pioneer Square's First Thursday Art Walk, you'll probably love the Capitol Hill version, which is generally extra weird and extra queer. This week's offerings include the opening of the Holiday Mini Art Exhibit at Ghost Gallery, which, sadly, is losing its lease.

COMMUNITY

City Fruit Celebrates
Join City Fruit for its annual fundraising event/harvest party, City Fruit Celebrates. It will feature all things cider, including ten local cideries, small plates from local chefs and establishments (Edouardo Jordan, Tom Douglas, Tarik Abdullah, and Full Tilt, to name a few), a live auction, on-site cider pressing, a photo booth, lawn games, and live music from Nathaniel Talbot. All funds will benefit City Fruit's vital work to protect Seattle's fruit tree canopy.

FILM

Here Comes the Night: 40th Film Noir Series
As Charles Mudede says, “If you love cinema, then you must love film noir”—a category he describes as full of “spiderlike women, lots of long knives, lots of rooms with dark curtains, lots of faces of the fallen, and lots of existential twists and turns.” Tonight, watch the suspenseful, hard-boiled Pickup on South Street.

FOOD & DRINK

Elysian Brewing's Taproom Grand Opening
Enjoy free food, $2 pints, and tunes by KEXP's DJ Sharlese at the opening party for the latest branch of the Elysian franchise.

I'M A CHEF!
I’M A CHEF! is part of local chef and Alinea alum Eric Rivera’s pop-up series, addo. It’s a 12-course affair highlighting the talents of 12 up-and-coming local chefs. One for each course, obviously. What’s extra interesting about it is that all 12 chefs are women. However, it is not presented as an all-female lineup. It is simply the lineup, which means that these chefs were selected because they were the people whose stars Rivera thought were shining the brightest. This is rad. As Bethany Jean Clement recently wrote in a piece on the Women Chefs & Restaurateurs Conference, the fact that such a thing even had to exist was frustrating for her. Indeed, when it comes to the culinary world, it’s hard to fathom why bro culture still has such a hold on kitchen culture. Food is food. It tastes good or it doesn’t. Much of the food that tastes really, really good in this city is cooked for you by women. This event recognizes that, but doesn’t make it all about that. It is, as it should be, about the food. TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

JDRF - YLC's Kickoff for a Cure
First off, I am maybe the least engaged type 1 diabetic out there. I do not go to T1D meet-ups, I do not post on T1D internet forums, and I only donated to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) once, and then only because a dear family friend was going to ride through Death Valley on a bicycle like an insane person to raise money for a cure and I felt obligated. However, the local JDRF chapter’s Youth Leadership Committee has come up with the perfect way to get curmudgeons like me to help raise money for the cause: Thursday Night Football and beer. Literally all you have to do to help do things like develop glucose responsive insulin is show up to Peddler, watch some football, and order a bunch of beers at normal price. They donate $1 from every pint to the JDRF. You get drunk and hopefully the Seahawks win. Really, though, everyone wins. TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

PERFORMANCE

And Other Stories with El Sanchez
Not content with just presenting an open mic storytelling night—even one featuring the delightful queer stand-up comedian El Sanchez—the Royal Room is throwing in a karaoke session and a craft fair. There will be 12 open mic spots for stories of six minutes each. Come up with a true tale and make people feel things!

READINGS & TALKS

Adam Gopnik
Glimpse New York in the '80s in Adam Gopnik's new memoir, At the Strangers’ Gate: Arrivals in New York, which documents the New Yorker writer and his future wife's arrival in New York city from Montreal. This is your opportunity to hear the Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters award-winner in person as he recounts tales of meeting artists like Richard Avedon and Jeff Koons.

Daniel Mendelsohn: An Odyssey
Daniel Mendelsohn (author of nonfiction Holocaust remembrance amalgam The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, longtime New York Review of Books contributor, and winner of many prizes including the National Book Critics Circle Award) will share his latest work, An Odyssey, a literature-inspired memoir about family.

Emerald Street: Race, Class, Culture, and the History of Hip Hop in the Northwest
Professor/writer/historian Daudi Abe (a Stranger contributor) will trace the history of Northwest hiphop music and culture, including not only big stars like Sir Mix-a-lot and Macklemore but also the "world champion break dance crew, its internationally read hip-hop magazine, the producers who collaborated with some of the biggest names in music, its world-renowned clothing designers, and the grassroots organizations dedicated to community service and education."

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Last Stop on Lilac
Annex celebrates the opening of its 30th season with this 1960s LA murder mystery written by local playwright Kelleen Conway Blanchard. The show centers on the death of “sweet-faced Bunny Le Blanc,” a Hollywood starlet who met her end on Lilac Lane. Gumshoes Larry Bruce (William Zimmerman) and Candy Spice (Jen Nelson) investigate the crime, which apparently involves “sacrifices, Tupperware, and go-go dancing knife fights.” I’m on board for Blanchard’s writing, which can be hilarious and wild when it wants to be. RICH SMITH

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

13th Annual HUMP! Film Festival
Every year we put out the call to sex-havers everywhere to submit a homegrown amateur porn film depicting whatever they're into (barring poop, kids, and animals, of course). The result is an incredibly diverse representation of human sexuality in all its straight, gay, trans, queer, kinky, funny, pissy, painful, and pretty forms. (And then it goes away, allowing the filmmakers to go back to their normal lives, thanks to the festival's strict privacy and security policies.) That diversity is also reflected in HUMP!'s audiences, making for a unique theater experience. The person sitting next to you might be seeing your everyday kind of sex for the very first time. In a world where fear and ignorance breed hatred, HUMP!'s demystifying inclusivity is on the front line of deflecting destructive alienation. (You also might surprise yourself by getting turned on by something unexpected.) And, like the best film festivals, it's also fun, thought provoking, and often hilarious. MARJORIE SKINNER

Cinema Italian Style
Cinema Italian Style is an eight-day-long SIFF mini-festival featuring the best in contemporary Italian cinema.

PERFORMANCE

Burn This
There are plays and there are plays. Lanford Wilson’s Burn This is the latter. It’s heavy, funny, and real (at least it was in 1987), and it's made for actors to sink their fangs into. Most of all, however, it is canon, and therefore both a challenge and an opportunity for a small local theater company to put its stamp on. Theatre 22 has enlisted a fantastic cast for the task: Carolyn Marie Monroe, Jason Sanford, Alex Garnett, and Tim Gouran in the critical role of Pale. This means they have a good shot. It also means that if they don’t bring it off, I’m gonna cry all over your shirt. SEAN NELSON

Her Story
The work of three very different, very major choreographers will be on display during this female-focused program. Crystal Pite's kinetic and structurally fascinating Plot Point makes its Pacific Northwest Ballet premiere, and Twyla Tharp's weird, swirling, galloping Afternoon Ball returns to wow and exhaust us, as does Jessica Lang's Her Door to the Sky, which will explode with a million soft New Mexico sunset colors. RICH SMITH

The Nance
This show is a tour through a bunch of gay history some people know very little about: the so-called “pansy shows” of the 1930s, a sort of gay minstrelsy most often performed by straight guys. Chauncey Miles (played by Richard Gray), a gay “nance” actor, must “hide his identity while he mocks it onstage” as he and his friends fight back police raids and general disdain. Look for Jasmine Jean Sim to turn in a good performance. And if you want to really make a night of it, for a few extra bucks you can buy cabaret seats, where you and a friend can share a complimentary bottle of wine, which you might need to get through the sad parts. RICH SMITH

Sovereign
This series of solo performances—in their words, "Seattle’s First Black Queer One Womyn Show Festival"—invites you to discover a range of talents among prominent black womxn artists. The programs include Amber Flame's "Hands Above the Covers: Hairy Palms & Other Nightmares of a Church Kid," a one-act play about religion and superstition in childhood; Po' Chop's Dynamite, an exploration of masculinity using striptease and storytelling; Anastacia Reneé's 9 Ounces, described as "an unkempt, de-ribboned braid dangling crooked parts"; and more.

FRIDAY

ART

UnWedged 2017 Opening
UnWedged is Pottery Northwest's annual Juried Contemporary Ceramic Exhibition. This time, it will be juried by acclaimed ceramic artist Patti Warashina, who makes figures and objects that are emotional, imaginative, and fearlessly strange.

READINGS & TALKS

Claire Messud: The Burning Girl
Claire Messud writes intense, engrossing novels, and earned plenty of awards and praise for her previous works that include The Woman Upstairs, The Last Life, and The Emperor's Children. Her latest book, The Burning Girl, is about a whirlwind friendship between two preteen girls. According to Dwight Garner at The New York Times, it lacks Messud's signature sharpness and voice—he describes the new book as "oddly distant," "formal," and "ultimately unconvincing."

Hugo Literary Series: Jericho Brown, Porochista Khakpour, Rachel Kessler, Katie Jacobson
Every time you think a Jericho Brown poem is about to drown in sentimentality or gushy eroticism, he makes a turn that freezes you solid, or boils you over, or completely vaporizes you. Look no further than every single love poem in his 2014 book The New Testament, which rightly scooped up a bunch of awards for its lyrical beauty and its incisive and understandably cynical perspective on the potential for true racial justice in America. He’ll be joined this evening by novelist Porochista Khakpour, whose memoir about living with late-stage Lyme disease, Sick, is due out this summer from Harper Perennial. Seattle’s very own (and occasional Stranger contributor) Rachel Kessler will offer up some new poems and visual art, and musician Katie Jacobson will present new songs based on the theme of neighborhood watches. RICH SMITH

Jeffrey Eugenides with Mary Ann Gwinn
Each of Jeffrey Eugenides' three novels have been bestselling smash hits—The Virgin Suicides, Middlesex, and The Marriage Plot have successfully seeped into the collective conscious. His latest work of fiction, Fresh Complaint, came out in October and promises a collection of both new and previously published stories from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author. He'll share excerpts alongside another Pulitzer winner: former Seattle Times book editor Mary Ann Gwinn.

Tom Gauld: Baking with Kafka
Tom Gauld is known for his books (The Gigantic Robot, Goliath, and You're All Just Jealous of My Jetpack) and his cartoons and illustrations that have been featured in publications like The New Yorker and The Guardian. Hear about his latest work, a best-of collection titled Baking With Kafka.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

PERFORMANCE

Meatball
Join Dragula star Meatball, Seattle drag icon Ladie Chablis, the Lashes cast, and other local talent for a night of high kicks and star power (and cocktails).

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Alison Marks: One Gray Hair
The Frye continues its outstanding track record of programming multimedia investigations of identity, tradition, and history with Alison Marks's first solo museum exhibition. Rejecting the notion that Native art must function spiritually to be considered legitimate, Marks uses unexpected materials and imagery drawn from contemporary internet culture to reimagine customary Tlingit forms as something fluid, playful, and made with whatever materials are available. Through her work, Marks constantly asserts that "culture is not stagnant"—new mediums create an ongoing context for new forms. EMILY POTHAST
Opening Saturday (Artist Talk on Friday)

Making our Mark: Art by Pratt Teaching Artists
The Pratt Fine Arts Center is a true resource for the community. It's the most grassroots, accessible place to make art of all kinds, from starting out in prints or clay or metal sculptures, to using large-scale or arcane equipment to realize a grand project that will be exhibited at a museum. And over the years they've had an incredible roster of teaching artists, including Buster Simpson, Marita Dingus, Mary Anne Carter, Preston Singletary, and Cappy Thompson. Making our Mark will showcase pieces by more than 250 past and present Pratt teaching artists, including those listed above, reminding local arts lovers exactly how much they owe to Pratt.
Opening Friday

PERFORMANCE

Eight Abigails
The power of one Abigail from Arthur Miller’s The Crucible was enough to kill dozens of her fellow townsfolk and cripple the local economy in the process. I can only imagine what righteous havoc the Eight Abigails in Kaitlin McCarthy’s dance will bring. Judging by her recent work, reframing “a whore’s vengeance,” as John Proctor describes Abigail’s false accusations, as a sympathetic act of rebellion against a repressive, Puritan society seems to be very much in McCarthy’s wheelhouse. RICH SMITH

Go, Dog. Go!
Look: P.D. Eastman’s 1961 children’s classic is about multicolored dogs that drive cars and ride scooters and ski so that they can all get to the party. In short: It’s a perfect book, but it doesn’t exactly scream out to be adapted for the legitimate stage. AND YET, the visionaries at Seattle Children’s Theatre have done just that, and brilliantly, from a script by playwright Steven Dietz, with inspired direction by Allison Gregory, and the work of a nimble, excellent cast. They did such a great job that the production is now in its second revival. If you have kids who aren’t robots yet, you could do a lot worse than taking them to see it. And even though that’s the point, the simple fact is that the production’s ingenuity is so impressive that a grown-up (especially one who’s a little, umm, s-t-o-n-e-d) would enjoy it a lot, too. SEAN NELSON

SATURDAY

ART

Georgetown Art Attack
Once a month, the art that resides in the tiny airport hamlet of Georgetown ATTACKS all passersby. In more literal terms, it's the day of art openings and street wonderment. This week, don't miss Emily Gherard: It All Burns and the Coltura Mural Unveiling Party.

FOOD & DRINK

Elliott's Oyster House 25th Annual Oyster New Year
Seafood is delicious, but a lot of your favorite fish are overharvested and in crisis. So if you want to dine fancily and sustainably, oysters are definitely the way to go. Elliott's Oyster New Year is sheer oyster insanity. Held in a giant tent on the pier behind the restaurant, it's got all-you-can-slurp of 30-plus varieties of local oysters at the 150-foot bar, a seafood buffet, live music, and all-you-can-imbibe of 60-plus local wines and 40 or so microbrews. Also: shots of vodka via a giant ice luge track, a "Most Beautiful Oyster" contest, and—composting! That's right: All of your discarded shells will receive new life as natural fertilizer or something. Proceeds benefit the Puget Sound Restoration Fund.

MUSIC

Big Dig Record Show
Twenty of the Northwest's top record dealers will converge and spread every style and genre of vinyl before us, with live sets by local DJs all evening long, as well as a full bar with ID.

READINGS & TALKS

Marc Maron and Brendan McDonald - Waiting for the Punch
Comedian/musicians/writer/man of many talents Marc Maron, best known for The Marc Maron Show and WTF with Marc Maron, will debut his book Waiting for the Punch, co-written with Brendan McDonald. It's a collection of interviews with such prominent culture icons, musicians, comedians, and actors as RuPaul, Amy Schumer, Mel Brooks, Will Ferrell, Amy Poehler, Sir Ian McKellen, Judd Apatow, Lena Dunham, Jimmy Fallon, Barack Obama, Robin Williams, and others.

Mark Bray: Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook
Mark Bray's Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook draws on his research and experience as left-wing organizer to document the antifa movement.

Mita Mahato: In Between
University of Puget Sound associate professor of English Mita Mahato is out with her first book of cut paper comic poems (how’s THAT for a genre blender), In Between. Mahato’s meditations on loss—of a mother, a lover, the world’s animals, and democracy—thematically bind each gorgeously sad section together. Her collection of “Extinction Limericks” are particularly good, and short enough to publish in full here. “There once was a tiger from Java,” one reads. The book’s true joy and energy derive from the artist’s mash-up of materials—rippling water cut from newspaper and animorphs excised from old dress patterns. RICH SMITH

Old Indian Tales
UW's Intellectual House promises a moody atmosphere (complete with fog machine) for this Native American storytelling event featuring Turtle Island artist Roger Fernandes (S’Klallam), Dr. Chris Teuton (Cherokee), and others.

PERFORMANCE

#shanghaipulse: A Dance-Video Installation & Screening
Paige Barnes's video diaries in Shanghai document her time learning Chinese herbal medicine. She adapted these videos into two collections of one-minute pieces and is presenting them in conjunction with social media art. Between the screenings, she will also conduct pulse readings and incorporate her findings into a dance.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

Found Footage Festival
The Found Footage Festival has dredged the internet (and elsewhere?) for propaganda from the Satanic panic era, music videos, instructional tapes, and other sources of bizarreness.

FOOD & DRINK

The Northwest Chocolate Festival
"Chocolate lovers unite!" is the rallying cry for this event, which will feature international chocolate exhibits, seminars from professionals, tastings, and a focus on sustainability. Exhibitors come from all over the world and include locals like Fran's, Dilettante, Hot Cakes, indi, and others.

SUNDAY

FILM

SHRIEK! Raw + Happy Hour
Feel thankful for all the cooked food you're going to eat on Thanksgiving by watching a screening of Julia Ducournau's horror film RAW—a very literal take of "the hungers that drive us." Guests can also enjoy 10 percent off food from the brewery.

FOOD & DRINK

Ready
Justin Khanna has international fine dining experience, and now is coming to Seattle with his Ready series of tasting menu pop-ups. This time, the series is "hosting an private event at the E. Smith Mercantile store to tell a story about the history of Pioneer Square through food."

The Best Chefs You've Never Heard Of
Some chefs are household names in this city: Renée Erickson, Tom Douglas, Rachel Yang. But do you know the names of those more down-to-earth cuisiniers who run the kitchens? Courtesy of Ethan Stowell and Joe Ritchie, meet the sous-chefs, banquet chefs, and chefs de cuisine who craft the excellent meals at some of the best restaurants in the city. Jeremy Arnold of Hitchcock, Christopher Coker of Adana, chef de cuisine Mitch Mayers of Lark, Tyson Wardell of Salare, Sadie White of Tavolata, Jason Melton of Four Seasons, and Alexus Williams of Navy Strength will prepare small dishes. Visit each chef's station, graze on their morsels, and relax with a drink (two are included with your tickets). Once you're finished, you'll have a new appreciation for head chefs' busy and brilliant first mates.

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