The weather outside may be frightful, but the Grilled Cheese Grand Prix is here to warm you up with over 30 different sandwiches and 30 different craft beers. Courtesy of Seattle Street Food Festival

Our music critics have already chosen the 33 best concerts this week, but now it's our arts critics' turn. Here are their picks for the best events in every genre—from Stephen Karam's The Humans to the Social Justice Film Festival, and from SAM Remix to the Grilled Cheese Grand Prix. See them all below, and find even more events on our complete Things To Do calendar, where you'll also find a list of new restaurants to try.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.


Jump to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday | Saturday | Sunday

MONDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Rain City Chefs Alliance Dinner
"The Rain City Chefs Alliance (RCCA) is exactly what it sounds like: a group of chefs working toward a common goal. What, exactly, is that goal? To 'unite the community of chefs in Seattle to offer diners truly unique and inventive dining experiences.' In plain English, they're doing a collaborative pop-up series. Also, those pop-ups raise money for Big Table, a nonprofit that helps chefs dealing with mental-health and substance-abuse issues," wrote Tobias Coughlin-Bogue about this series' first event in October. "This dinner might seem spendy, but remember that it's brought to you by the closest thing Seattle has to an all-star team and it's raising money for a very good cause. It's also representative of a burgeoning trend in this city toward more daring in fine dining, which is something that we definitely need. Encouraging the culinary adventures of the RCCA is well worth your money." This second edition will feature guest chefs Deborah Taylor of Finistère in Port Townsend and JJ Proville of L'Oursin in Seattle. For an extra $50 per person, you can sit at the chef's table by the fire pit.

READINGS & TALKS

A.E. Stallings
Rich Smith describes A.E. Stallings as a "top notch formal poet with deep intellectual and aesthetic roots in ancient Greek writings."

MONDAY-TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Deb Perelman
Deb Perelman has never worked in a restaurant, but her food blog Smitten Kitchen features more than 1,200 recipes and has won multiple awards. Based on the popularity of her accessible, dressed-up-comfort-food recipes, down-to-earth writing, and mouth-watering, sun-soaked photos she takes in her tiny New York apartment, Perelman has become a giant in the food-writing industry. She’ll come to Seattle on her book tour for her second and much-anticipated cookbook, Smitten Kitchen Every Day: Triumphant & Unfussy New Favorites, which includes 115 recipes, 101 of which are new, for everything from cake to ceviche.

MONDAY-THURSDAY

FILM

Cinema Italian Style
There’s no neat way to sum up the range of style and talent at this year’s Cinema Italian-Style Festival at SIFF Cinema Uptown (Nov 9-16), except that it will draw from the richest veins of the country’s filmic life. For one thing, two films cast nonprofessionals in lead roles, a hallmark of the Neorealism movement of the 1940s and ‘50s. The War of the Yokels stars young first-time actors in a visceral fable about a war between rich and poor teenagers in rural Puglia. A Ciambra, the second film by Jonas Carpignano (Mediterranea) and this year’s Italian Oscar submission, immerses itself in the life and community of a marginalized Roma boy. Speaking of Neorealism: If you have any doubts that filmmaking can be an expression of profound love and empathy for one’s fellow humans (and animals), see the restoration of Vittorio De Sica’s Umberto D, a 1952 masterpiece about a destitute retired civil servant, his desire to die with dignity, and his bond with an adorable dog. If you’ve never been, make this your first rendezvous with Cinema Italian-Style. It looks like a particularly good year, full of the humanist spirit and earnest fun that’s always abounded in the country’s art. It might be exactly what you need as the year grows dismal.

PERFORMANCE

Coriolanus: Fight Like a Bitch
The all-women cast of this infrequently produced Shakespearian tragedy stars Z Nation’s Nike Imoru, who showed off her ability to play King Lear and Lady Macbeth in her solo show Ode earlier this year. When she bellowed Lear's famous line, "Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!" I felt a desperate urge to see her take on a kingly role of classical proportions, and the theater gods (who are taking the form of Rebel Kat Productions) have granted me this wish. Straight from the audition materials: “What happens when we smash our current political, gendered landscape onto the sacrosanct canvas of one of the greatest playwrights ever? If a man can destroy an entire city… can’t a woman do the same? We say they can.” RICH SMITH
No performance on Tuesday

TUESDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Domestic Decadence Beer Dinner
Crack open a Rainier (or your other favorite light domestic beer) to be enjoyed with a classic dive bar menu of pickled eggs, fish and chips, mac & cheese, meat and taters, and ice cream for dessert.

READINGS & TALKS

A Conversation with Harriet A. Washington
Harriet A. Washington (author of the bestselling, National Book Critics Circle Award-winning book Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present, which looks fascinating and disturbing) will speak about her latest work, Infectious Madness, which deals with "bioethics, history of medicine, African American health issues and the intersection of medicine, ethics and culture."

Janet Fitch: Revolution of Marina M
Janet Fitch is known for writing darkly compelling novels like White Oleander and Paint It Black. At this event, she'll share her new historical fiction book The Revolution of Marina M, in which a young woman from St. Petersburg "will join the marches for workers' rights, fall in love with a radical young poet, and betray everything she holds dear, before being betrayed in turn."

Lawrence O’Donnell
MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell delves into another tumultuous time in American history in Playing with Fire: The 1968 Election and the Transformation of American Politics, exposing Nixon's undemocratic practices and the lingering "fallout" from his administration.

Reza Aslan
Join prolific Iranian American writer Reza Aslan, known for his 2013 biography, Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth, for a multimedia presentation of his latest book, God: A Human History. The book explores the origin of religion and "how different ideas of God have both united, and divided us for millennia."

Salon of Shame
Writing that makes you cringe ("middle school diaries, high school poetry, unsent letters") is read aloud with unapologetic hilarity at this Salon of Shame.

TUESDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Loyal Opposition: The Protest Photos of George P. Hickey
See a collection of prints and negatives of protests in the US from local photojournalist George P. Hickey, including the World Trade Organization protests in Seattle and LGBTQ equality, animal rights, and anti-war rallies.
Curator talk on Wednesday

PERFORMANCE

The Bodyguard
Deborah Cox—an actress and singer known for bringing Canadian R&B to ears worldwide—will star in this production of The Bodyguard, a musical about an unexpected romance between a superstar and her bodyguard, based on the 1992 movie starring Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston. (Cox also provided vocals for last year's made-for-TV Whitney Houston biopic.)

WEDNESDAY

READINGS & TALKS

History Café: Ghosts of Seattle Past
Ghosts of Seattle Past, a compilation by editor Cali Kopczick and artist Shelley Leavens, seeks to keep the memory of bygone Seattle community hangouts alive through art, photography, comics, interviews, and reflections. At this History Cafe, meet the creators and share your own recollections of the places you miss. Shed a tear for Cafe Racer?

Kate Lebo and Samuel Ligon: Pie and Whiskey
Novelist Samuel Ligon and poet Kate Lebo are braving the mountain pass to bring Seattle this collection of (very good) recipes and writings from Jess Walter, Steve Almond, Elissa Washuta, Anthony Doerr, and many others. Each literary contribution was spurred by booze-filled buttery reading parties the editors have been throwing out in Spokane and Missoula. I have no memory of eating pie and drinking whiskey at the same time. But the idea of pie and then whiskey appeals, or whiskey and then pie and then whiskey again, especially if those pies are made by Lebo, the best pie-maker there is. Plenty of both those staples will be available at this reading, in addition to fine poems and stories from Robert Lashley, Anastacia-Renée, and Washington State poet laureate Tod Marshall. RICH SMITH

Physicist, Engineer, Spy: The True-Life Story of Peter F. MacDoran
Peter F. MacDoran was a NASA physicist in the 1970s. While visiting in the 1970s, at the freezing point of the Cold War, he met Soviet dissenters who asked him to smuggle important papers to the US, despite the KGB's suspicions. Hear MacDoran tell the story from his book The Old Men Will Die First.

Robert W. Merry: Why US Presidents Succeed or Fail
Join Robert W. Merry in conversation with Folio President David Brewster as they discuss his newest book, President McKinley: Architect of the American Century. Before McKinley was assassinated shortly into his second term in 1901, he "jump started" the Progressive Movement.

William O’Daly: Book of Twilight
Poet and translator William O'Daly is known for his translations of Neruda—hear about his latest work, Book of Twilight, which was Neruda's first book and has never received a full English publication.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

ART

Amanda Manitach: Dirty
From afar, Stranger Genius Award nominee Amanda Manitach's block prints look like inner thoughts (or perturbing greeting cards) punched into colorful stains. Get closer, and you'll realize that these stains are elaborate patterns that may evoke Victorian wallpaper. Manitach's artistic process is demonstratively physical: She rubs patterns into splashes of color, getting herself "dirty" in the process. She says: "I see my work as a task of both consciously and subliminally sorting out the experience of a female trying to make expressive marks—a task that has found uncanny resonance for me with the history of female hysteria." Like her sexualized, meme-y T Shirt Girls series or Nothing Left to Say, which took material from Frances Farmer's autobiography, Dirty interrogates popular and private verbal expressions of femininity.
Opening Wednesday

Dirk Staschke: Perfection of Happenstance
Dirk Staschke's take on the Dutch "Vanitas" paintings, reminders of death painted by 16th- and 17th-century artists, uses ceramic and wood sculpture to explore images of decay.
Opening Wednesday

Paul D. McKee and Suzanne Tidwell: Horizon
Paul D. McKee and Suzanne Tidwell collaborated on this exhibit that explores their personal futures and pasts: "representations of craft and construction, family and home and education and career elicit a dialog reflective of their current sense of place and accomplishment."
Artist talk on Wednesday
No viewing on Thursday

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY

PERFORMANCE

The Government Inspector
The richest tradition in Russian literature does not begin with Leo Tolstoy but with Nikolai Gogol. In the first half of the 19th century, Gogol formed the foundation of a tradition that includes Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Yury Olesha, Vladimir Nabokov, Sasha Sokolov, and Tatyana Tolstaya with only three major works: a novel (Dead Souls), a novella (The Overcoat), and a play (The Government Inspector). The first work is one of the greatest things ever written in the universe that is known. The second is a masterpiece of Russian literature, and the third is just plain fun. The play involves a young man who is mistaken for a secret inspector by the corrupt officials of a small town. These officials do everything they can to please the young man. Wives and daughters are offered to him, and he accepts all of these gifts. Like Dead Souls and Overcoat, the humor in The Government Inspector is not bright or totally dark. It’s a humor that’s mezhdu sokakoi i volkom—between the dog and the wolf. This is the time of day when the shepherd can’t tell who is the friend and who is the enemy of his flock. This is the twilight time. CHARLES MUDEDE

Love, Chaos, and Dinner
Beloved circus/cabaret/comedy institution Teatro ZinZanni will return to Seattle for a dinner theater production of Love, Chaos, and Dinner. They promise "the same stunning, velvet-laden, and iconic Belgian spiegeltent Seattleites will remember from Teatro ZinZanni’s former location on lower Queen Anne." The cast is led by first-time "Madame ZinZanni" Ariana Savalas, and will feature a duo on aerial trapeze, a magician, a "contortionist-puppet," a yodeling dominatrix, a hoop aerialist, and a Parisian acrobat.
No performance on Thursday

Onerus
This dinner theater production will explore a San Junipero-style fantasy: a world in which people live out their lives virtually, with their brains connected to the cloud. The machines at onērus™ offer "100% organic dreams harvested from Deviants"—see what that might look like at this Cafe Nordo spectacular.

Wonderland
Wonderland returns! Can Can will transform its venue into a snowy chalet and populate it with teasing beauties.

THURSDAY

ART

Sacred Geometry for Artists
Stranger art writer Emily Pothast will speak on how Renaissance artists like Jan Van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, and Albrecht Dürer used geometry to structure their art. She'll also lead some "visual mathematics" exercises, so you can mess with sacred geometry on your own.

FILM

Here Comes the Night: 40th Film Noir Series
As Charles Mudede says, “If you love cinema, then you must love film noir”—a category he describes as full of “spiderlike women, lots of long knives, lots of rooms with dark curtains, lots of faces of the fallen, and lots of existential twists and turns.” This week, the series will turn to the late noir homage Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

FOOD & DRINK

Feast For Change: Exploring the World One Pairing at a Time
Chef Lisa Nakamura and Sous Chef Iryna Mykhalchuck will pair an international menu with Machine House Brewery’s English-style beer. Taste traditional foods from ​Syria, ​Iraq, ​Ethiopia, ​Ukraine, and beyond, while meeting immigrants and refugees from the countries as they share their stories. We hear there will also be live music, dancing, and a silent auction.

PERFORMANCE

The Dinner Party Download
This live edition of NPR's Dinner Party Download offers a chatty take on culture, food, and conversation hosted by Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam. This time, guests include New York Times columnist and author Lindy West, singer Kyle Craft, and others.

Queen4Queen
Local drag artists Cookie Couture, Jade Dynasty, Harlotte O'Scara, Khloe5X, and Uh-Oh! will share the stage for a night of performances, dancing, and star power.

READINGS & TALKS

Chris Matthews
Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC's Hardball, will read from a new biography of called Bobby Kennedy: A Raging Spirit. Find out about Kennedy's stint in the Navy as a common sailor and the effect on his politics.

Mark Z. Danielewski: The Familiar Volume 5
Rich Smith called Mark Z. Danielewski's most famous novel, House of Leaves, "the literary Rubik's cube of my college years." For the past few years, Danielewski has been writing his The Familiar series (he plans to publish a total of 27 volumes) that focuses on a vast web of interconnected narratives. At this event, he'll share the fifth installment.

Paisley Rekdal with Dana Levin
The best essay I read this year was called "Nightingale: A Gloss," and it was written by Seattle writer (but current University of Utah prof) Paisley Rekdal and published in the American Poetry Review. In a straightforward, no-bullshit tone, and with her characteristically sharp eye for scholarly associations, Rekdal weaves the story of a sexual assault she experienced while hiking alone in Loch Ness with Ovid’s story of Philomela, other rapes of antiquity, and also with the story of her writing a poem called “Philomela.” Her reckoning of the assault, and her reckoning of her own reckoning, reveals sexual violence for what it is: a pillar, not an aberration, of Western civilization. She has two new books coming out: a book of poems from Copper Canyon called Imaginary Vessels and a book-length essay called The Broken Country: On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam. So if she doesn’t read "Nightingale" at this event, seek it out. RICH SMITH

Richard Rothstein: The Color of the Law
Author Richard Rothstein explodes the myth of the equitable American city in his study of the de jure—legislated—segregation in The Color of Law. Though it's long been accepted that racism has divided up cities, Rothstein argues, apparently with overwhelming evidence, that discrimination was enforced by local, state, and national law. According to Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic, Rothstein's research on the subject is "brilliant."

Scott Kelly in Conversation with Andrew McIntosh
Former U.S. Navy fighter pilot, test pilot, and NASA astronaut Scott Kelley currently holds the record for total time in space—hear about his life and career as he shares his new memoir, Endurance.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

ART

CoCA Legacy Exhibition
CoCA presents a retrospective of some of its most prominent artists throughout its 36-year history, including Laurie Anderson, James Turrell, Mary Ann Peters, Juan Alonso-Rodriguez, Elizabeth Sandvig, and others. They add: "In sharing this experience, CoCA hopes not only to celebrate its robust archives and the pedigree of Contemporary Art in Seattle, but also to catalyze CoCA's future legacy of-as the name suggests and the exhibition will showcase-Seattle's epicenter on contemporary art."
Closing Saturday

PERFORMANCE

Burn This
There are plays and there are plays. Lanford Wilson’s Burn This is the latter. It’s heavy, funny, and real (at least it was in 1987), and it's made for actors to sink their fangs into. Most of all, however, it is canon, and therefore both a challenge and an opportunity for a small local theater company to put its stamp on. Theatre 22 has enlisted a fantastic cast for the task: Carolyn Marie Monroe, Jason Sanford, Alex Garnett, and Tim Gouran in the critical role of Pale. This means they have a good shot. It also means that if they don’t bring it off, I’m gonna cry all over your shirt. SEAN NELSON

THURSDAY-SUNDAY

ART

Fruiting Bodies
Explore "the mysteries and secrets of the fungal world" at this group show featuring artist Lara Kaminoff.
Opening Thursday

Zhi Lin: In Search of the Lost History of Chinese Migrants and the Transcontinental Railroads
Seattle artist and UW professor Zhi Lin's work has drawn on Chinese-American history to explore uncomfortable truths as well as quotidian realities. Christopher Knight at The Los Angeles Times described some of his work in 2009: "At Koplin Del Rio, most of Lin’s landscape drawings are made on sketch-pad-size paper using pencil and thinned Chinese ink. Their modest scale and simple materials yield a sense of the artist sketching on-site, as if taking pictorial rather than written notes of what he sees — a method employed by countless 19th century artists from the American East traveling through the Western frontier. Lin could have used a camera (period photographs of the Chinese laborers at work are not scarce), but drawings connect eye to mind to hand in a powerful and thoughtful way."
Artist talk on Thursday

FILM

Social Justice Film Festival
Celebrate progressive causes and learn more about pressing social issues at the Seattle Social Justice Film Festival. Films include Whose Streets? and Trails of Hope and Terror.

PERFORMANCE

Go, Dog. Go!
Look: P.D. Eastman’s 1961 children’s classic is about multicolored dogs that drive cars and ride scooters and ski so that they can all get to the party. In short: It’s a perfect book, but it doesn’t exactly scream out to be adapted for the legitimate stage. AND YET, the visionaries at Seattle Children’s Theatre have done just that, and brilliantly, from a script by playwright Steven Dietz, with inspired direction by Allison Gregory, and the work of a nimble, excellent cast. They did such a great job that the production is now in its second revival. If you have kids who aren’t robots yet, you could do a lot worse than taking them to see it. And even though that’s the point, the simple fact is that the production’s ingenuity is so impressive that a grown-up (especially one who’s a little, umm, s-t-o-n-e-d) would enjoy it a lot, too. SEAN NELSON

Graham Reynolds + Shawn Sides + Lagartijas Tiradas al Sol
Super popular Austin-based creative duo Graham Reynolds and Shawn Sides are teaming up with innovative Mexican theater company Lagartijas Tiradas al Sol to present a new work, Pancho Villa From A Safe Distance. This performance, described as "experimental opera," will explore both Mexican and American perspectives on the famous Mexican Revolutionary general.

Kitten N' Lou Present: Cream
A confession: I've watched Kitten N' Lou's wedding video at least 20 times. They're just so gosh darn intoxicating and lovely. (It's on their website. I didn't, like, steal it or anything.) The burlesque duo exudes a chemistry unrivaled by any other stage pair I've seen, and, luckily for Seattle, this "world's showbusiest couple" are mainstays of the Emerald City. Their new show, Cream, brings Milk, Cherdonna, and the Atomic Bombshells along for a Spanksgiving feast of drag and burlesque. Go and prepare to fall in love. CHASE BURNS

The Nance
This show is a tour through a bunch of gay history some people know very little about: the so-called “pansy shows” of the 1930s, a sort of gay minstrelsy most often performed by straight guys. Chauncey Miles (played by Richard Gray), a gay “nance” actor, must “hide his identity while he mocks it onstage” as he and his friends fight back police raids and general disdain. Look for Jasmine Jean Sim to turn in a good performance. And if you want to really make a night of it, for a few extra bucks you can buy cabaret seats, where you and a friend can share a complimentary bottle of wine, which you might need to get through the sad parts. RICH SMITH

FRIDAY

ART

SAM Remix
SAM Remix is a recurring and ever-changing art party that includes performances, tours, and dancing, inspired this time by the exhibit Andrew Wyeth: In Retrospect—which you're welcome to tour. Guests artists include dancers Lavinia Vago, Jenna Eady, and Tyisha Nedd, drag UFO Arson Nicki, Aramis O. Hamer, and others.

FOOD & DRINK

Beaujolais Nouveau
Welcome the season's new wines at this festival with excellent French wines like the Beaujolais Nouveau, a buffet featuring fine French-influenced cuisine, French music (live and DJ), and a silent auction of rare treats that include wine, hotel, and restaurant certificates.

Toklas Society Presents: Alison Roman
Angela Garbes moderates a discussion with Alison Roman, Suzi An (Vita Uva), and Alex Pemoulié (Mean Sandwich) as they talk about how they launched their careers what it’s like to be a woman in the food industry. Tickets include a sandwich and side, as well as a Ramona wine cooler.

PERFORMANCE

Trivia Puppet Company presents: Teatro Celtico Ombre
See three puppet performances that are based on the Isle of Man: A magical island full of "fairies and boogies and all sorts of monsters" from the Manx legend. This installment's performances include "the Coracle," about a hero leaving Ireland for the Isle of Man, "the Moddey Dhoo," about the black dog of Peel Castle, and "Aengus," based on William Butler Yeats' "Song of Wandering."

READINGS & TALKS

Alec Baldwin & Kurt Andersen Book Signing
Though Spy cofounder Kurt Andersen recently wrote Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History, a truly indispensable book about American life, and though Alec Baldwin is a truly fine actor and excellent radio host who recently wrote a goodish memoir called Nevertheless, these two big deals are coming to town to sign copies of a book called You Can't Spell America Without Me: The Really Tremendous Inside Story of My Fantastic First Year as President Donald J. Trump (A So-Called Parody), designed, presumably, to capitalize on Baldwin’s Trump impression, which only feels good if you still say “internets.” But who knows? Maybe the book is just “what we need right now.” Also, it’s not a reading. It’s a signing. No photos are allowed. Expect a long-ass line. SEAN NELSON

Bushwick Book Club: Lindy West's Shrill
Local artists and musicians will perform original music inspired by and based on local hero and ex-Stranger staffer Lindy West’s critically acclaimed memoir Shrill.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

FESTIVALS

Freakout Festival 2017
What’s better than the Mothers of Invention’s debut album Freak Out!? A 34-band, Ballard takeover where you can infinitely freak out under the influences of Porter Ray’s flow-and-beatsmith hiphop, plus enjoy Smokey Brights’ synthy riff rock. Where Charms’ shoegaze-y thrash-rock will charm your pants off. Where Cumulus’ sad-song jams will pinch you on cloud nine. Where Taylar Elizza Beth’s seamlessly fitting, legato-lipped rap will impress even a tailor. And where Acid Tongue’s fuzzy licks and quips will take you on a trip. If that’s not convincing enough then My Goodness (also playing), I don’t know what is. ZACH FRIMMEL

FOOD & DRINK

Grilled Cheese Grand Prix
With over 30 different sandwiches and 30 different craft beers, plus wine, spirits, and ciders, this two-day Grand Prix will host the ultimate battle royale in all things bread and cheese, with each entry more decadent than the last. Contenders range from Fire & Scrape's "The Pickleback" (bourbon-braised pork shoulder with a pickleback shot topped with a scrape of raclette cheese on French baguette) to the Grilled Cheese Experience's "Purple Haze" (triple cream borgonzola, blackened hangar steak, potato chips, parmesan crusted sourdough, blackberry balsamic reduction). Which grilled cheese will take home the gold?

PERFORMANCE

Dear White People
Samuel L. JackYouSon's variety show is meant to "bring levity to political language and invite new perspectives" through a mixture of live music, burlesque, poetry, dance, and spoken word. Featured talent includes Taqueet$, Boom Boom L’Roux, Anastacia Renee, and the Black Tones.

READINGS & TALKS

Ordinary Cruelty: The Cabaret
Amber Flame is a poet and performer, and Hugo House's newest Poetry Writer-in-Residence. At this event she'll celebrate the release of her debut collection Ordinary Cruelty with a night of poetry, burlesque, music, and comedy.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY

FILM

ARCS Romanian Film Festival
The fourth annual Romanian Film Festival will celebrate Romania's cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity. On the lineup are films by two of the most celebrated directors working in the country, Cristi Puiu (famous for The Death of Mr. Lazarescu) and Radu Jude (director of Aferim!), as well as Iulia Rugină's award-winning Breaking News.

KINOFEST Seattle
This festival, in association with the Portland German Film Festival, screens new and classic German-language cinema from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Films include a documentary on the great actor Udo Kier and another about climbing a remote rain forest mountain, the classic 1946 film Murderers Among Us, a historical drama about a Swiss police officer who broke the law to rescue foreign Jews, and more.

PERFORMANCE

The Humans
Stephen Karam's The Humans, which won a 2016 Tony Award for best play, gets plaudits for its expert characterization, its subtle but gut-busting humor, and its clear-eyed view on contemporary family relations despite the fact that it's a play about a dysfunctional family spending a dysfunctional Thanksgiving together in Chinatown dysfunctionally. This is the official Broadway tour, directed by Joe Mantello. RICH SMITH

SATURDAY

ART

Pancakes & Booze Art Show
That's right, hungry-thirsty-arty pancake aficionados, this show's got everything you need: 70 or more artist vendors, a free pancake bar, DJs, and body painting.

COMEDY

Ilana Glazer and Phoebe Robinson
Once upon a time, a queen was born, who rose from humble roots in St. James, New York, to bestow laughter upon the world as one half of the lovable stoner duo on Broad City. Her name was Ilana Glazer. Another queen, born hundreds of miles away, grew up to make an amazing podcast featuring all sorts of funny folks who aren’t white, straight, or male. Now these "besties from another testes" have joined forces for their first stand-up tour (called "YQY" which stands for "Yaaas Queen Yaaas," natch). And, as luck would have it, they’re coming to Seattle, so no #FOMO allowed. AMBER CORTES

FOOD & DRINK

Andrew Will Winery Pop-up
Vashon's Andrew Will winery is trying to offload their excess inventory from last year, and they're doing it from a convenient Capitol Hill location. Besides being able to pick up $50 bottles for $15, you'll get a crack at magnums, library wines, and other rarities. This is an amazing chance to kickstart your wine cellar, and—pro tip—keeping a few semi-fancy wines in a rack in your kitchen and not drinking them goes a long way towards making people think you're not a complete drunk. TOBIAS COUGHLIN-BOGUE

Oyster Classes
Taste bivalves from across the land, enjoy wine pairings, compare "oyster culture" in various regions, and learn how to properly shuck and prepare oysters.

Washington Distillers Festival
Use your 10 tastes wisely and try out samples from Batch 206, Blackfish, Copperworks, Westland, and many other fine Washington distilleries.

PERFORMANCE

Carnal Knowledge
Whether you're a burlesque neophyte or a well-versed habitué, let Miss Kitty Baby, The Marquis Façade, and kikiTHEpuck take you through a history of the art. DonnaTella Howe will host this drag and burlesque spectacle.

READINGS & TALKS

Finnegans Wake by James Joyce: Part I, Chapter 3
I love James Joyce. I do not, however, love his last and craziest work, Finnegans Wake. It’s a book that really has only one reader, Joyce himself. And he is dead. But his book is still around. What to do with this unreadable work, with its mixed words, made-up words, forgotten words, dream-dripping words? One person, Neal Kosaly-Meyer, has decided to commit the entire thing to memory and then perform it from memory. Maybe this is the only way the novel could be saved. It’s not all that amazing to memorize something that everyone understands; it’s very impressive to memorize something understood by only one person, who has been in the grave for many years. If you want to appreciate the strangeness of this situation, then I recommend you read a short story by the 20th-century Italian writer Tommaso Landolfi. It’s called “Dialogue of the Greater Systems.” CHARLES MUDEDE

This Is the Place: Women Writing about Home
Editors Margot Kahn and Kelly McMasters will present their collection This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home, and will be joined by a number of incredible contributors: Kate Lebo, Jane Wong, Maya Zeller, Tara Conklin, Elisabeth Eaves, and Claudia Castro Luna, to name a few.

SUNDAY

FOOD & DRINK

Brunch with Musang
Don't wait to get your tickets for Bar del Corso chef Melissa Miranda's latest feast pop-up, known as Musang, on this third Sunday of November. People flock to taste her twists on traditional Filipino dishes every time she cooks—so despite the eight seatings, this brunch may sell out quickly. This time, Miranda is throwing a Filipino/Hawaiian birthday party for some very lucky person she names as Aaron Boi. You'll be lucky, too, if you can share in the bounty.

Joule's One Night Only
Tuck into a family-style, five-course meal courtesy of Chef Rachel Yang and winemakers Leah Jørgensen of Leah Jørgensen Cellars, Javier Alfonso of Pomum/ Idilico, Chad Stock of Minimus/Omero, Mark McNeilly of Mark Ryan, and JJ Williams of Kiona. All of the dishes will be straight from Yang's cookbook, which you can buy along with the dinner.

PERFORMANCE

RainBowGore Cake Presents: Aurora Boulevard Starring Jackie Hell
Instead of Sunset Boulevard, it's....Aurora Boulevard! And instead of William Holden, Gloria Swanson, and Erich von Stroheim, it's RainBowGore Cake, Jackie Hell, and Miss Spooky! Best of all, it's an all-ages performance, so here's your opportunity to take Baby* to their first drag spectacle.
*The Stranger is not responsible for the presence of any babies at this show.

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