In the U.S., This Video Might Have Earned Its Star a Spot on RuPaul's Drag Race

Comments

1
Those thousand lashes are an abomination. They use doctors, in violation of their Hippocratic oath, to ensure that the patient is kept alive and conscious, doling them out in parcels as he heals from the last one. I'm sure Loveschild is on board the "cultural differences" train here as well -- she's never passed up an opportunity to endorse torture and injustice elsewhere.
2
1
it is a travesty for doctors to waste their time on lashings when there are babies to be slaughtered
3
Saudi Arabia is another sick theocracy that tortures it's citizens. Human rights are violated all the time. And we call them our friends because they have oil. Fuck them!
4
but they do fund al-Qaeda ... 95 percent of their worldwide funding, 95 percent of their volunteers, and 100 percent of the madrassas to churn out more terrorists, some of which are even in the USA as we speak!

the madrassas that is.

they're not friends. they never were.
5
This reminded me of an Atlantic article that explored how all Saudis, gay and straight, basically live in the closet thanks to sharia law. Saudis live in a culture where it's much easier to find sex with your own gender, whether you're straight or not. The gays Nadya Labi talked to describe an amazing situation:

Marcos, a 41-year-old from the Philippines, was arrested in 1996 for attending a party featuring a drag show. He spent nine months in prison, where he got 200 lashes, before being deported. Still, he opted to return; he loves his work in fashion, which pays decently, and the social opportunities are an added bonus. “Guys romp around and parade in front of you,” he told me. “They will seduce you. It’s up to you how many you want, every day.”

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arch…
6
Thanks for the link to that article, gus. I'll read it later, but it looks good.

From the article: The rules are enforced by the mutawwa'in, religious authorities employed by the government’s Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.

I was just listening to a bit on NPR yesterday about the Saudi religious police, and I love that committee name with its dual "PV." An Arab journalist they were interviewing said that although the religious police still wield a lot of power, somewhat of a turning point came in 2002, when some of the police refused to allow girls to leave a burning school because they weren't properly covered, and fourteen girls died. Apparently, after that horrific incident, Saudis began to feel more free to criticize them.
7
And yet even these savages provide their citizens with free medical care and unemployment benefits. Hrmm.
8
Dee, Saudi society isn't bad in every respect. But their treatment of gays and lesbians, and women, is very repressive. I mean, can you imagine even the most rabidly-conservative Christians refusing to let girls leave a burning school because they weren't properly covered? I can't.

One witness said he saw three policemen "beating young girls to prevent them from leaving the school because they were not wearing the abaya".

The Saudi Gazette quoted witnesses as saying that the police - known as the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice - had stopped men who tried to help the girls and warned "it is a sinful to approach them"