Bad News from Intiman: The Theater Needs $1 Million in the Next Few Months or It Will Close

Comments

1
Wow - in the last four months they've squeezed $348,598 in donations from the Board - no wonder the last item is "Cultivating new Board membership". Best bring a fat wallet if you're gonna join that one any time soon...
2
Unfortunate, but not in the least bit surprising :(
3
Dang. That's some serious financial mis-management.

4
Well they can always convert to one of those fancy film based movie theaters everyone keeps talking about.
5
I know. I'm gonna sound harsh and maybe even over-reaching here, but really, it's kind of how I feel when cops kill drunk wood carvers: is there anything you can do that you don't expect to be completely forgiven for?
6
what did the NEA director just say? "there might be too many arts organizations"?
7
It would also be nice if Intiman would stop scapegoating Brian Colburn...he didn't steal the money, or spend it. Years of overspending and waste and the laziness of the Board has led to the woes of Intiman. It wasn't one man/woman, but many, including fair haired child Bart Sher.

This is just your typical non-profit implosion caused by profligate spending, inadequate fundraising, poor administration from both sides of the house (artistic/managerial) and a shitty board of directors not doing their job.

Same thing happened at the LGBT Center, (obviously on a much smaller scale) and thousands of other non-profits across the country.
8
Sorry dears, this theatre is not Too Big To Fail.
9
First, I know next to nothing about arts orgs or fundraising. That said, this would seem like a great opportunity for a backwards fundraiser. In other words, I would pledge the 499th-500th thousand dollars. Assuming they get to that point, I pay. The next character pledges the 498th-499th...etc. Would a model like that work? Cobbling this idea onto some aggressive outreach to employees of matching employers would seem to get them (or another organization) a long ways toward stability.

Again though, I know not what of I speak.
10
Where the fuck is their endowment, Brendan!? Did they spend it all?!?!?
11
ummmm, I don't think Intiman's financial woes can be attributed solely to the Managing Director, when imminent financial crisis has been common knowledge for years. The Board has fiduciary responsibility for a mess that has been accumulated for years. New leadership inherited old problems.

The mid-sized cultural organizations have the toughest job--they require more than a shoestring to run on, yet rarely see the kind of support the big guys receive. There is no margin for error in mid-sized performing arts organizations, as Intiman is demonstrating right now.
12
Ummm, it is irresponsible of the press, public, or Board to lay this solely at the feet of the Managing Director. Intiman's precarious financial condition has been common knowledge for a long time, and it is the Board's primary responsibility to serve as trustees of the organization for the benefit of the public. In other words, fiduciary responsibility goes further than just inspecting the books.

The mid-sized arts organizations have a tough time at all times, but especially when the economy turns downward. There is simply no margin for error, loss, or philanthropic indifference. It takes more than a shoestring to run a company that has created as much as Intiman has for Seattle. I think it's worth saving, no?
13
This is a company that needs leadership, not micro-management. Board, is this the best use of your time and efforts?

* Establishing new Task Forces from the Board to continually monitor fundraising, past payables, vendor communication and the budget.

* Increasing board involvement in all areas of oversight for the various departments, especially in the areas of finance, accounting and budget tracking.

* Reinstating checks and balances systems from the Board down to hourly staff who handle money.

* Documenting all practices and procedures.

* Identifying new CFO (in progress).
14
ummmm, I don't think Intiman's financial woes can be attributed solely to the Managing Director, when imminent financial crisis has been common knowledge for years. The Board has fiduciary responsibility for a mess that has been accumulated for years. New leadership inherited old problems.

The mid-sized cultural organizations have the toughest job--they require more than a shoestring to run on, yet rarely see the kind of support the big guys receive. There is no margin for error in mid-sized performing arts organizations, as Intiman is demonstrating right now.