Failure at the Beacon Hill Station?

Comments

1
Those take time to grow in, Charles. They don't install them fully grown. Although it does seem to be taking off slowly considering the amount of time it's been there.
2
Geesh, give it a summer.
3
Needs kudzu.
4
@2, it's coming up on its fifth summer, dipshit.

They always put this crap in because it looks good in the watercolors, but they never mention "oh, by the way, someone's going to have to tend and water this constantly". It's the vertical equivalent of the sad, bedraggled, weed-strewn rows of dead plants you see along the meridian of recently "beautified" city streets. They'll pay to put them in but they won't pay to maintain them.

A consultant got paid $100,000 to write "drought-tolerant" in a PowerPoint presentation about it, though.

When's the last time you saw one of these "green walls" that didn't look just like this? Not counting private enclosed courtyard spaces packed with moss and kept continually wet, that is.
5
@4 - You know what doesn't require constant care to flourish? Kudzu.
6
@5, your pro-kudzu agenda is starting to grow on me.
7
Good Morning Charles,
I was just at the Beacon Hill Station this past Sunday and found it all right. I was there to view the Beacon Hill branch of Seattle Public Library (SPL). I'm on a quest to view all 27 (?) branches of SPL. I thought the Beacon Hill branch especially pleasant. I liked the "twirling boat" tower. I also got my "passport" stamped.
8
@7, what's your favorite so far? I think I like Broadview best (since the old Ballard beauty was abandoned). I also like the old-school Carnegies in Fremont, Green Lake, and the U District (though the appeal is lessened considerably when a recent visitor has left a big poo stain in one of the cloth-upholstered chairs, as happened a while back at Green Lake). My favorite KCLS is Shoreline, but that's mostly because it's closest.
9
Just forget about the plants and put an ads up there. The transit system could use the money.
10
The Beacon Hill station is a perfect example of bad urban planning.

That Charles would focus on the plants rather than the far more significant and _obvious_ flaws in the design is just so unfortunate.
11
@9, right on.
12
Really, just install giant scream TeeVees. We can watch Mountain Dew commercials!
13
@8,
I've seen about 14 so far over the past 6 months. All are charming in their own quirky way. For example, the International District branch features art with an Oriental touch both from various parts of Asia and locally made. However, that I can recall besides the Central, the Capitol Hill, Beacon Hill and Ballard branches stand out. In addition, I too am fond of the old Carnegie branches. So far, it is most fascinating.

BTW, I'm also on a quest to view all 50 State Capitols. I've visited 12 already. I just got back from Boise, ID last week. Nice ediface for a Capitol Building.
14
@13

When you finish the state capitols, what about trying all the Starbucks?
15
more moronic "green factor" from the pseudo-environmental minds at DPD and Council. expect more of this shit all around Seattle for a while...
16
Non-BS versions being worked on at UW architecture school:

http://www.conservationmagazine.org/2012…

http://www.king5.com/news/environment/UW…
17
Yes, Charles. You dig into that and keep up your installments on the Beacon Hill Library's architectural woes. Leave the real journalism to the journalists. Those of us who value the features you hate are anxiously waiting to hear why we are wrong. Whats next in line for your complaints; Jefferson Park, increased commercial investment, schools?
18
I'm with @1. Give it time! And, even if it fails, at least they gave it a half-assed attempt, it's not a big fucking deal.
19
That's a green screen, not a green wall.