Not all gay men played with dolls when they were little boys... but almost almost all little boys who played with dolls grow up to be gay men. And sometimes those gay boys grow up to be talented and powerful fashion designers. Queerty has the backstory for the viral Barbie ad campaign:

In a statement sent to BBC News, Mattel states: “This video parodies iconic Barbie commercials from the 1980’s starring a young [Moschino creative director] Jeremy Scott look alike. The video celebrates how boys and girls alike play with Barbie—it’s all about self-expression, fashion, imagination and storytelling.” Those sentiments sum up our thoughts, as well. Just to be clear, Mattel is indeed responsible for the commercial, although Scott called the creative shots during the filming. In his own statement, Scott says, “When I dreamt up the concept for the Moschino Barbie fauxmercial, I felt it was natural to have a little boy representing for all the little boys like myself who played with Barbies growing up.”

It's wonderful that we live in a world where conventionally masculine pro basketball players and soccer players can be out, as well as Olympic skiers and ass-kicking/porn-making boxers. But little boys who play with barbies—and grow up to be iconic fashion-house-reviving designers—aren't a "harmful stereotype." Those boys exist and there's nothing wrong with them. And those boys came out first (because they couldn't hide) and they came out swinging. It was little girly boys who made it safe for masculine gay dudes to come out and not the other way around.

Sponsored
Washington Ensemble Theatre presents amber, a sensory installation set in the disco era
In this 30-minute multimedia experience, lights & sounds guide groups as they explore a series of immersive spaces.