THURSDAY 9/11


FIRSTNAME LASTNAME, THE HIGH VIOLETS, BLACK NITE CRASH
(Crocodile) See Stranger Suggests, page 23.

Friday 9/12


The Joggers, The Lights, DuTch FlatS
(Crocodile) Four-part harmony. In an indie rock band. I am so there. Portland four-piece the Joggers (formerly Stateside) craft comfortably crowded compositions that aren't unlike the ones being written by all those stutterily syncopated New York bands that everybody likes so much--but that's not to suggest that the Joggers are a vapid lot. Solid Guild, the band's debut full-length, just seems to sugarcoat the thickness of their music--jutting guitar play as juxtaposed with the aforementioned vocal ridiculousness--in an easy-to-swallow, blissful pill. No easy feat, considering the chaos of their erratic constitution. ZAC PENNINGTON Also see preview, page 41.

The Weakerthans, The Constantines, Roy, DJ Franki Chan
(Graceland, late) On its own merits alone, the Weakerthans' latest record, the beautifully packaged Reconstruction Site, distinguishes itself as an apt indie-pop album--peppered with dull-arrowed heart-jabs, cleverly spiraling imagery, and repeating themes, all amongst fuzzed alt-country twang. But there's always something to be said for context. With a trajectory like frontman John Samson's (Samson is the former frontman of pseudo-political punk-pop band Propagandhi), Reconstruction Site begins to hint at a Paul Westerberg-styled progression, with Samson's early history only emphasizing the forward movement of his craft. Standing at least a few yards ahead of their closest contemporaries (I mean, the record is on Epitaph, for godsake), the Weakerthans have finally crafted the solid, sentimental pop record that no one seemed to know they had in them. ZAC PENNINGTON Also see preview, page 45.

THE HOLLOWPOINTS, THE SILENT FILM STARS, GUESTS
(Old Fire House) I was listening to an advance of the new Distillers release recently and the goddamn thing was so good it put chills up my spine. With so many tepid pop-punk acts flooding the market, it's tough to write punk songs that are both catchy and street-tough, and the Distillers definitely stand out in our current rock climate as one of the few acts who can successfully marry the two. The HollowPoints are another--although they don't have the Distillers' major-label polish, the Seattle band writes punk anthems that lift the spirits of whatever club they're playing for. Lyrically they can move from the personal to the political without missing a beat, and live, they've blown me away every time I've watched them play. JENNIFER MAERZ

BUSTA RHYMES
(Puyallup Fair) Busta Rhymes has had a long career as a rap star. He first came to pop life on "Scenario," the final track of A Tribe Called Quest's second and best CD, The Low End Theory (1991). Back then Busta was the most visible and energetic member of the highly regarded crew Leaders of the New School, coupling with impressive results his cartoonlike antics and a rapping style that borrowed heavily from Jamaican toasting. In the mid-'90s, he was launched into superstardom by the single "Woo-Hah!! Got You All in Check"; also around this time, he began making guest appearances on every rap or R&B single that moved. Realizing there was mo' money to be made in this bright world of ours, Busta Rhymes added movie acting to his portfolio (though his now near-decade relationship with Hollywood has failed to do for him what it's done for Queen Latifah and Will Smith), and a line of hiphop clothes called Bushi (though this relationship has yet to do for him what it's done for P. Diddy). These days, you don't turn to his CDs for inspiration or new ideas, but simply to hear Busta attempt to make yet another fast buck. CHARLES MUDEDE

The Court & Spark, Jon Hyde Band (CD Release), THE JUSTIN CURTIS SHOW
(Sunset, late) Good news for anyone who knows that heartache and harmony go together better than eggs and whiskey: The Bay Area's Court & Spark are just about set to release a new album and a new EP. It's a flurry of activity from the band whose last release, Bless You, came out in 2001. The group has been slowly perfecting its slightly burnt-out, starry-eyed, and meticulous pop ruminations since the late '90s. More recently, they've been up late at night spinning records by Bert Jansch and John Martyn, and basically learning how to turn their own folk-based melodies into something both sacred and cosmic. Oh yeah, and they recently shared the stage with Norm from Cheers. No, really. JON PRUETT

NO USE FOR A NAME, IRISH CAR BOMB, GUESTS
(Graceland) In the late '80s, long after punk's fiery British birth but before its current bubblegum incarnation, there emerged a generation of musicians determined to take Social Distortion's ideas to the next level and discover the perfect blend of melody and melancholy. With fast-paced, bouncy tunes and a commitment to seriously addressing the problems facing their teenage fan base, No Use for a Name quickly rose through the punk-rock ranks. Now, 16 years and several guitarists after the band's formation, No Use's angst-riddled anthems continue to gain approval among those searching for something a little less fluffy than mainstream pop-punk. Opening act Irish Car Bomb showcase a lineup consisting entirely of musical expatriates from bands like Radiobaghdad, Against All Authority, and No Use itself. JAMES SUTTER

Saturday 9/13


31KNOTS (CD RELEASE), LANDS FARTHER EAST, GUESTS
(Vera Project) See Underage, page 61.

Pleaseeasaur, Plastiq Phantom, Grafton, Richard Peterson
(Sunset) In the past I have declared that Pleaseeasaur sucks. Truth be told, however, such a declaration is patently untrue. I was trying to be funny, but I failed. Pleaseeasaur does not suck--in fact, he (and occasionally it, depending on his costume) should be declared a Seattle treasure; no band in this town consistently entertains at such a high caliber. Whether he's rapping about limousines or cougars, Pleaseeasaur delivers what I can only lamely describe as rib-ticklin' entertainment. BRADLEY STEINBACHER

CHAOS AT THE CROC: E-ZEE TIGER, RED BENNIES, THE SPITS, EX BOYFRIENDS, FUCKIN' CHACHIS
(Crocodile) E-Zee Tiger is a one-man boogie-rock freakout of delayed guitars, delayed drums, delayed vocals, and delayed delay pedals. Denver Broncos fan Anthony Petrovic (of Gay Barbarians fame) lugs his messy room up from SF for this show with local punk heroes the Spits. Watch as Petrovic does his best to avoid both strangulation from the tangle of chords that litter the stage and electrocution from the pile of gear he sits behind as he plays. Then groove to the crazy bastard's combination of melodic, VU-based/Pavement-esque deep-fried rock-and-roll (à la Pussy Galore's Historia De La Musica Rock) and straight-up psychedelia. With his limited-edition CDR release, Hey Kids I'm a One Man Band! --which has hand-silkscreened covers and artwork by a local SF art-scene celeb--Petrovic has been blowing minds since he started passing his stuff out at shows sometime last year. This is one one-man band you want to see. MIKE McGUIRK

Sunday 9/14


The Exploited, Total Chaos
(Studio Seven) It's a tough time to be an ostentatiously outraged fashion punk. Hair spikes and prodigiously patched leather jackets just aren't the same now that those Good Charlotte geeks arrived with their squeaky-clean take on the crusty costume. Even worse, squishy-soft "hardcore" outfits have co-opted everything from bumper-sticker song titles (always pair a profane action verb with a vaguely evil entity such as "society," "authority," or "the system") to chest-rattling backbeats. But while it can be difficult to differentiate today's punk purists from their capitalist clones, veteran groups such as Total Chaos and the decades-old Exploited will always top the whippersnappers. They've got higher Mohawks, their bile is bitterer, and their songs go down like gargled glass rather than hard candy. Total Chaos covered the Exploited's "Sex and Violence" on their most recent disc, so perhaps these anti-everything anarchists will come together for a joyous sing-along at the end of their serrated sets. ANDREW MILLER

KARL BLAU, THE POISON DART, SOUND STORIES
(Luscious Studios) To know, know, know him is to love, love, love him. And I do. Along with his record label, the Bret Lunsford-helmed Knw-Yr-Own, Karl Blau can be comfortably credited with great deal of the inspiration currently fueling Anacortes' modest music scene. On top of his folk-heavy solo work and his longtime contributions as a member of D+, Blau's earthworn touch has been subtly felt over a good deal of the Microphones' recordings since that band's inception. Blau is joined by representatives of Anacortes' other beacon of light--the Department of Safety arts collective--in the form of the evocative and atmospheric songs of the Poison Dart. EDITH WONG

BURNING SPEAR, KID HOPS, GUESTS
(Showbox) Burning Spear is responsible for one of the greatest albums ever made, Marcus Garvey (and its dub version, Garvey's Ghost), which was released in 1975 to celebrate the supposed 100th year of Marcus Garvey's birth. Ambitious and worldly in a 19th-century way, Garvey is considered to be the father of modern Black Nationalism. Through newspaper articles and speeches on Harlem's street corners, Garvey, like his successors in the second part of the 20th century, encouraged black pride and black economic independence from white America. Burning Spear's CD is a long Rasta prayer to his achievements and big dreams. Though the vocalists drift in and out of coherence as they chant about moments in Garvey's life, what the album manages to do--and what pop CDs almost never do these days--is to realize a complete concept, a total architecture. Each track communicates with other tracks to construct, in the end, a towering idea about one thing: Marcus Garvey. In this respect, the album is like Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, or even Mobb Deep's Hell on Earth. Be sure to be immaculately stoned for the Burning Spear show. CHARLES MUDEDE

WORMWOOD, HELL PROMISE, ME INFECTO, RESINATOR
(Graceland) Recently, I was lucky enough to get my hands on three new Wormwood 7-inches that have since been rocking my record player. They're splits with the Esoteric, Fall of the Bastards, and Teen Cthulhu; the last record, my favorite, is marbled with crazy images of a skull and an eyeless little girl. The song on that Cthulhu split, "Release from Expectation," lines brutal aggression with ghostly ascension: Demonic screaming in tongues complements eerie angelic backing vocals, and blasts of noise temper cobwebbed keyboard melodies. It's this sort of metal-meets-black-velveted-goth equation that Wormwood calculate well, and dabbling in both simultaneously doesn't weaken the sums of their complicated constructions in the slightest. JENNIFER MAERZ

MONDAY 9/15


ATMOSPHERE (SLUG & MR. DIBBS), MICRANOTS, ODDJOBS, DEE JAY BIRD, BROTHER ALI, VITAMIN D
(Showbox) See preview, page 43.

MIKE SEEGER
(Tractor) It was because of former Hazel singer Pete Krebs, who was also fronting a bluegrass-based band called Golden Delicious, that I discovered Mike Seeger, brother to Pete. "Coo Coo Bird" was my favorite of the Portland band's rousing sets, and Krebs never failed to dedicate it to me before he and Kansas transplant Kevin Richey began to sing. I learned that there were many versions of the famous song (which dates back to 1799), but it was Mike Seeger's version Richey and Krebs recommended. Mike's new collection of American folk songs, titled True Vine, is a spare and unfettered album of pride and knowledge, and on it he plays "Coo Coo Bird" on a huge banjo made from a gourd. This should be one hell of a fine show. KATHLEEN WILSON

TUESDAY 9/16


SEXY PRISON, THE CRIPPLES, SCIENCE VICTIM
(Re-bar) See Live Wire, page 47.

FOURTHCITY LAPTOP BATTLE
(Chop Suey) See Stranger Suggests, page 23.

TAG-TEAM BEATDOWN #1 WITH DJ SELF-ADMINISTERED BEATDOWN, DJ ELEMENTAL CHILD
(Green Room) The Showbox's Green Room turns into a battle for your dancing soul for two nights in a row. Two DJs go head-to-head to get the room moving, and tonight's pairing promises to sling some serious soul, psych, pop, mod, and other good stuff from the '60s and '70s your way. The only losers at these Beatdown events are the ones who show up and won't dance--or the lame-asses who don't show up at all. JENNIFER MAERZ

UNLIMITED SUNSHINE TOUR--CAKE, CHEAP TRICK, THE DETROIT COBRAS, THE HACKENSAW BOYS
(Moore Theatre) Robin Zander still sounds and looks incredible, Tom Petersson gets better looking with age, and the stoic Bun and comedic Rick show an obvious maturity, but then again they always did. As one of the most influential power-pop bands in the history of rock, Cheap Trick's live shows are always satisfying and should not be missed. As for the band's summer-released Special One, well, it doesn't stink, but it sure makes the listener feel old, and should be avoided at all costs. Play the old records and see the band live--although it is so very annoying, and almost a full-blown travesty, that Cake headlines tonight's show. Come early, leave early, that's my advice. KATHLEEN WILSON

GOLDIE, DEMO
(Baltic Room) I still have faith in British junglist Goldie, even though he is no longer the superstar he was in the '90s, when he dated Björk and competed with Tricky for space in the British music press. One word suffices to describe his work: bombastic. The emotion he expresses is not that of the individual but the oceanic, or galactic. For example, his 1996 track, "Inner City Life" (which has several versions, the best of which uses a hiphop rather than a jungle beat), surpasses all other songs about the inner city in terms of passion. Goldie presents us with the total cry of the ghetto, as everything that the inner city could possibly be or mean--its history, its future, its suffering, its desires--is communicated by the expansive voice of the singer and the massive mood of the music. CHARLES MUDEDE

THE WHITE STRIPES, YEAH YEAH YEAHS
(Seahawks Exhibition Center) The more you love these bands, the further away they seem to get. Remember the days when you could catch the Yeah Yeah Yeahs at a place the size of the Crocodile, or the White Stripes in a place like Sit & Spin (R.I.P.)? Sadly those moments are long gone, and the closest you're gonna get to Jack W. and Karen O. when they play Seattle is the Seahawks Exhibition Center. And yeah, both bands are so polished at this point it'll probably sound fabulous, and yes, they both released excellent new albums this year (hence the astronomically multiplying fan base), but really, wading through a bullpen this size is a feat reserved for those who simply must see their idols again-- and so close on the heels of Bumbershoot, that doesn't seem like the most thrilling environment to enjoy them in. AMY ROACH

WEDNESDAY 9/17
TAG-TEAM BEATDOWN #2 WITH DJ SELF-ADMINISTERED BEATDOWN, DJ ELEMENTAL CHILD

(Green Room) See Tuesday's listing.

RAINER MARIA, DENALI, THE CATCH, IMA ROBOT
(Graceland) Rainer Maria, the New York-based trio that formed in Madison, Wisconsin, delivered an explosive divorce album earlier this year with Long Knives Drawn. While it may have been the end of bandmates Caithlin De Marrais and Kyle Fischer's personal relationship, it ignited their artistic one. The band drew on the quantum leap they'd made on their previous outing, A Better Version of Me, finding a solid identity apart from their emo roots and tapping a hard-pop vein (inflected by punk) without ever turning into pop-punk. De Marrais takes lead-vocal duty and proves herself as a great frontwoman, neither selling herself nor selling herself short. She attacks her words with relish and ferocity: "Let's get over each other/So that we can fall in love again," she seethes on the title cut of Long Knives Drawn. Fischer's guitar is a live wire from song to song and William Kuehn pummels the drums with flare. It's a grown-up breakup song cycle that burns and soothes. NATE LIPPENS

THE WALKMEN, KAITO, DIOS
(Vera Project) Last time kaitO swung through Seattle's Crocodile they made me think of Cub, an all-girl, cartoon-cute Canadian rock band that I'd all but forgotten about. (Others may be reminded of Bis and Kenickie.) As for the Walkmen, though, they're an entirely different sound altogether. Forged of three former members of the lost Jonathan Fire*Eater and a new charismatic singer, the Walkmen are like an aural roller coaster ride--not one of those hanging-from-the-armpits thrillers, but the gentle highs and lows of a children's version. They lull and excite with perfect timing, and that they look like a bunch of kids ingrained with the social graces only a moneyed upbringing provides (oxford shirts tucked into trousers, belted, of course) makes their live shows all the better. KATHLEEN WILSON

THE CURTAINS, MAHER SHALAL HASH BAZ, GUST BURNS, THE BLACK LODGE
(CoCA) Calling San Francisco's Curtains an "experimental pop band" is sort of misleading, so I'll do my best to avoid such a degrading term. See, the ever-evolving San Francisco instrumentalists (featuring both current and former members of Deerhoof) play music that's quite definitely experimental, and also, in the vaguest sense, "pop"-referenced--but there's so much more to it than that. Their latest record--22 tracks of synthesizer hiccups, impossible rhythms, and piercing guitar--is only comfortably comparable to their sibling band--and with that as our point of reference, the Curtains are sort of like Deerhoof's less comprehensible middle brother: He may not be the cute one, but damn it if he ain't charming. EDITH WONG