Post Mortem

Inside the Newsroom on the Seattle Post-Intelligencer's Final Day

Comments

1
We wish them well. One of the more depressing developments seems to be every right-wing Ork coming out of their grottoes to blame the paper's failure on its Left Wing Bias. What year is this?!
2
The P-I was one of the great truly local things about Seattle. I'll miss it terribly. Seattle will be a little bit less gritty without the honesty of the P-I -

-disclaimer - I was a P-I copy editor in the old 6th & Wall building - the one everyone called the Daily Planet back then. Had to leave town when I lost that job - the original 70's Boeing bust days. Before that, this was 71-72, I was making $7500 a year and living in an apartment on Summit and biking down Denny to work. Awesome days of yore.
3
When I first moved to Seattle, the PI was the right wing paper, and the Times was the leftist paper.

Now we only have a right wing rag left, and it doesn't even cover much local news in Seattle, only in the suburbs.
4
what's paper?
5
Like many newspapers today they let their editorial pages spill over into their news reporting.

That's reason enough to say good riddance.
6
Omissions bother me even more than the slanted news. Why waste time reading when they hype what they like and omit what they don't? Take this gay rag as an example. For decades, the slimy uberbelly of gay life has been a number of gays deliberately infecting harmless gays with HIV and hep C. The Stranger could have gotten to the bottom of this years ago and saved many lives. They pretty much know who these murderers were and are. But it makes gays look bad, so they omit reporting the biggest gay story ever. Better dead than read.
7
Hearst Had Offers For The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, They Just Weren't Any Good
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/hearst-ha…
true??
8
The P-I was (and is) a pioneer in a pioneering city and region. But, we are all the worse for it's loss in print. Many great things we take for granted (parks, bridges, civic institutions) are here because the P-I advocated for them. Part of the value of a newspaper is, once it's printed, you cannot take it back. And part of the value of having *two* daily papers competing is, the staffs of both work harder, dig deeper and serve their readers (and the public discourse/civil society) better. Losing the P-I is like losing a good old friend, whose arrival I looked forward to every day. But then, I guess some people who have never had the experience don't know the difference and are satisfied with lackadaisical and unprofessional reporting (think USA Today) which now passes for news. Good-night, P-I, we'll miss you!