THURSDAY 10/24


GODDAMN GENTLEMEN, RICH GIRLS
(Zak's) See Stranger Suggests, page 31.

SAETA, THE MINES, TREASURE STATE, CHRISTOPHER BLUE
(Sit & Spin) See preview, page 51.

J MASCIS, COBRA VERDE
(Tractor) See CD Review Revue, page 55.

MARS ACCELERATOR, TOTFINDER, SICK BEES
(Liquid Lounge) Tonight the fancy veneer of the Liquid Lounge will be put to the test as three of Seattle's finer noise combos unleash their sonic abrasion on a venue that's more used to house DJs and singer-songwriters' acoustical strummings than face-ripping skronk-fests. First up, Sick Bees will set your hair on end with their dual female fist of shriek/twang guitar/vocals shackled with primitive, broken-beat drumming. Next, man-on-man duo Totfinder will raze whatever isn't already standing, with barely arranged blasts of ear-bleed guitars and freeform, smile-on-your-face rock-star drumming that makes you itchy for a drum solo. Finally, Mars Accelerator will propel you to the furthest reaches of the galaxy before plunging you into the heart of the nearest gas giant with their cerebellum-tickling avant-noise space jams. These are three bands that all too rarely take the stage, so don't miss this chance to get your ears cleaned out in the pristine confines of the Liquid Lounge. Just be sure to scrape your shoes off the ceiling before you leave. DAN PAULUS

JAY TRIPWIRE, NANCY KYD, MANOJ, PROFESSOR STONE, DJ MAGNETO, ZION 12, RAMA
(I-Spy) To celebrate the opening of a third Zion's Gate record store in Vancouver, BC--the other two are in Portland and Seattle--DJ Professor Stone, who represents the Portland store, will spin dub and dubby house, and Nancy Kyd, who represents the Vancouver store, will spin twisted roots, while Zion 12 and Rama, who represent Seattle, will spin ragga, 2-step, and jungle. As Tank in the movie The Matrix said, "Zion's where the party [will] be." CHARLES MUDEDE

FRIDAY 10/25


AMON TOBIN, PREFUSE 73, BONOBO, DJ P-LOVE
(I-Spy) See preview, page 46.

VOYAGER ONE, KINSKI, SINESTRO
(Crocodile) See CD Review Revue, page 55.

MIDNIGHT THUNDER EXPRESS, THE SPITFIRES
(The Comet) Yet another fine rock showcase at the Comet. Midnight Thunder Express have been on the road for a couple months now, and they're back to celebrate their one-year anniversary. Wuh-hoo! Expect some rowdy garage rock 'n' roll tonight. And I've yet to hear the Spitfires, but the punk kids tell me great things about this Canadian band--plus there's a member of the Black Halos (R.I.P.--what a fun band to watch play live) with them, which definitely works in their favor. JENNIFER MAERZ

MY LIFE WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT
(Graceland) Talk about a band that's fallen off the radar. I remember being in high school and dancing to tracks from Front 242, Nine Inch Nails, and My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult as industrial punks filled the underage nightclub scene. Now, 10 years later, the act whose biggest hit was "Sex on Wheelz"(from Cool World) sounds so campy and clawless compared to the harder industrial bands who have persevered in the mainstream. Heavy on the costumes, theatrics, and synthesized beats, the sample-savvy MLWTTKK struggle to keep themselves relevant in a world where Marilyn Manson and Trent Reznor make much more interesting music. JENNIFER MAERZ

SATURDAY 10/26


THE DONNAS
(Tower Records, University District) See preview below.

THE DONNAS, CAMPFIRE GIRLS, YOUR ENEMIES FRIENDS
(Graceland, early) I tried to give the Donnas a chance, listening to their albums as they got released, but they've all been too cute, with too much of the "Look, we've got our badass shtick on" instead of just writing badass songs. Even when their punk Svengali split from the band, the Donnas still sounded too poised, like we were being sold an image more than solid hooks and meaty pop punk with an edge. With Spend the Night, the Donnas have finally started to rock. The band's fifth album veers between pop punk and campy pop metal, like the Toilet Boys meet the Sahara Hotnights. Even without the references to whiskey and commands to "Take Me to the Backseat," the Donnas sound like a mature--but still kinda silly--rock act. If the band is determined to stick with ear candy, at least they're moving into the hard variety, leaving the saccharine bubblegum side behind. JENNIFER MAERZ

GARAGELAND
(Sonic Boom Records--Ballard, the Tractor) Any chance to see New Zealand's Garageland is a must for fans of pure, jangly pop. Sha-las, Woo-hoos, and tambourines abound, and anyone who's ever loved Superdrag, Pavement, Faces, Brian Wilson, or even Crowded House and Squeeze will find much to love in this FUN (no better word) band. Do What You Want (1999) began heartbreakingly sweet with the lyric, "In the middle of the ocean there are trash cans of devotion," and it's been devotion on my part ever since. The band's new CD, Scorpio Righting, is equally swoon-inducing, and features a second disc of acoustic material culled from the two aforementioned albums and the band's debut, Last Exit to Garageland. Pop lovers unite tonight. Trust me, you'll go home smiling. KATHLEEN WILSON

REDNECK GIRLFRIEND, RADIO NATIONALS
(Marina Cantina) One of the more traditionally country alt-country bands in Seattle, Radio Nationals pour their heart and soul into each live show. Crowds remain loyal and turn out for every date, and they are rewarded with a tight, professional-sounding performance that doesn't try to give the fans anything less than what they deserve for their attention. Completely without pretense or a lick of irony, Radio Nationals truly are one of Ballard's best. KATHLEEN WILSON

THE SPITS, A FRAMES, INTELLIGENCE
(Fallout Records, 3 pm) See preview, page 45.

SUNDAY 10/27


SALIF KEITA
(Century Ballroom) I must admit that, despite being African, I don't listen to much African music. Part of the reason is it's hard for me to separate the dismal condition of Africa from the music. If I listen to the spiritually charged, electrified mbira music of Thomas Mapfumo, I'm reminded of the evil president of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe. If I listen to the flowery Afro-pop of Zaire, or Papa "La Vie Belle" Wemba, specifically, I'm reminded of the country's jungle wars, extreme poverty, and outbreaks of Ebola. Salif Keita, on the other hand, comes from Mali, a country I know next to nothing about. This makes listening to his magical music bearable. I can actually enjoy his golden voice (Keita is also known as the Golden Voice of Africa) without thinking of the death and poverty surrounding it. But I'm sure if I look closely at the history between France and Mali, he too will become unbearable. (To make matters worse, I'm listening to Debussy's "Des Pas Sur la Neige" as I write this preview--talk about colonial mentality.) CHARLES MUDEDEMONDAY 10/28


THE VELLS, DJS FRANKI CHAN AND RED LEATHER CHAPSTICK
(Graceland) I'm just going to keep telling you every week that the Vells are nothing short of great until every one of you have given them a listen. They shine on their own more than they do sandwiched between heavier bands, as theirs is a deceptively fragile pop, so tonight's bill should find the Vells in their best light. KATHLEEN WILSON

BEENIE MAN, KIRK DAVIS AND SILVERCAT, SMILEZ AND SOUTHSTAR
(Ballard Firehouse) Most who go to this show will do so for one reason, to hear "Who Am I," which made Jamaican rapper Beenie Man world-famous in 1997. But what is this song about? Beenie Man says bizarre things like, "Is like a riverside upon the bank an' you take it/Is like a bicycle so you hold it and dash it/Now you wash it/So you crash it," and, "An me a move like a electric/Is like a basketball/She take time out to vomit." What the hell is he going on about? And how could this surreal flow form the substance for a massive hit? Because it's repeatedly interrupted by this question: "Zim zimma, who got the keys to my B'mer?" It is one of the great lines in all of dancehall. Really, who the hell has the keys to Beenie Man's BMW? CHARLES MUDEDE

DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL, HOT ROD CIRCUIT, RHETT MILLER
(Northgate Theatre) At first I questioned the wisdom of pairing Old 97's frontman Rhett Miller with current emo faves Dashboard Confessional. But after spending some time with Miller's new solo album, it all started to make sense. Like his emo brethren, Miller's very much in touch with his inner teenager; Instigator is chock full of wide-eyed songs about falling in and out of love, of getting crushed and trying to reach out to the one you love. It's the giddy rush of new love and the doe-eyed hurt of first heartbreak, all rolled up in songs with hooks larger than Texas and delivered with an irresistible, innocent charm. In fact, it's that charm and charisma that truly separates Miller from the pack of overly earnest emo boys he's sharing the stage with tonight. Life (and love) might be serious, but that doesn't mean you can't be entertaining.... BARBARA MITCHELLTUESDAY 10/29


RYAN ADAMS, TEGAN AND SARA
(Moore) Cynics and sycophants alike--forget (almost) everything you know about Ryan Adams. At this point, after dalliances with Winona and accolades from Elton, the guy should need no introduction--and yet he does, since sometimes the myth of Ryan Adams looms larger than the artist himself. Tonight, you have the rare opportunity to judge the man solely on the merits of his talent, as he steps into the spotlight (mostly) alone. Anyone who was fortunate enough to catch his utterly stunning solo performance at the Century Ballroom earlier this year will vouch for the fact that it was THE way to experience him--stripped of all the extraneous bullshit and with nothing to hide behind, he was charming, self-deprecating, and even slightly nervous. And his voice? Amazing. When he's on, Adams radiates soul and depth in a truly heartbreaking way. Here's hoping for an encore performance. BARBARA MITCHELL

Rarely do I feel this to be necessary, but I've got to add my two cents on Ryan Adams below Barbara. One coat of black fingernail polish and a couple members of the Strokes as his friends (which he will not let us forget in one name-dropping interview after another), and all of a sudden Ryan Adams is some kinda punk alt country star. I call bullshit on that one. His last record, Gold, was a putrid piece of warmed-over John Cougar Mellencamp that I sold back the same week I bought it. Although it'll never get praise bestowed on this guy who's so middle-of-the-road-sounding they should paint yellow stripes across his forehead, Adam's newest record, Demolition, is much better than his last one. Demolition lets down a guard Adams flies high in person, with songs like "Cry on Demand" sounding forlorn, and a warm yearning accompanying many of the softer harmonies he laces gently into his songs. The album still has its cringe-worthy moments, but they're fewer and farther between. At least now Adams has grown from adult-contemporary cheeseball to AC cheeseball with a heavy heart--and there is a little bit of beauty opening in that latter half. A little warning, though: The cocky bastard will not tolerate you calling out for Bryan Adams songs, as reports came out last week that he threw people out of his shows when they requested hits like "Summer of '69." JENNIFER MAERZWEDNESDAY 10/30


HOT WATER MUSIC, COHEED & CAMBRIA, CURL UP AND DIE
(Graceland) Beneath the scraggly neck beards, faded tattoos, and balled-up undershirts of Hot Water Music lies one of the most incredible punk bands around today. They can be hit or miss on record, but it's their powerhouse live show that makes them who they are. Few acts possess such an insatiable work ethic as Hot Water Music--the band has easily played over 500 shows in the last couple of years. Tonight, don't be afraid to join the macho boys in front of the stage in the frenzied finger-pointing, pogo-ing, and other vaguely homoerotic activities that make hardcore music so much damn fun. CARMELO MARTINEZ

SWAYZAK, CODEBASE, KRIS MOON
(Baltic Room) See Speaker Freak, page 58.