Photos by Kelly O

To find out if Robin Pecknold's voice and face could effectively seduce and/or sedate members of the animal kingdom like his band Fleet Foxes has already done to millions of human beings, The Stranger went to the Woodland Park Zoo armed with a portable device playing Fleet Foxes' new full-length, Helplessness Blues; the May 2011 issue of Spin with Pecknold on the cover; and a camera. Here are the results of our investigation.

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Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus)

Initial behavior: Foraging for insects on ground.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: No reaction.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject buries head in small rock enclosure.


Siamang (Hylobates syndactylus)

Initial behavior: Sitting at water's edge, hands clasped together.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Subject begins grooming.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject yawns.

Worth noting: "Siamangs sing so loudly that it can be heard for up to 3 miles," according to the zoo.


Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae)

Initial behavior: Perching on artificial rock formation.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Subject stretches, steps down, and retreats to rock enclosure.


Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)

Initial behavior: Swimming, waddling.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject begins grooming itself. Peers appear irritated and retreat.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Subject wags tail stub. Peers retreat further.

Worth noting: A pack of children continually ram empty stroller into subject-habitat Plexiglass retaining wall. Zoo officials absent.


Brown bear (Ursus arctos)

Initial behavior: Grazing on grass.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Grazing continues.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subjects cease grazing and retreat to an enclosure.


Gray wolf (Canis lupus)

Initial behavior: Scavenging unidentified debris haphazardly distributed via unidentified zoo employee.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: No reaction.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject begins following zoo employee in opposite direction of audio source.

Worth noting: "Sometimes wolves howl just for the pleasure of it," according to the zoo.


Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus canadensis)

Initial behavior: Grazing atop modest incline.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: No notable reaction.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Initial indifference, but after several minutes of exposure to the audio, female peers engage in affectionate, apparently homosexual, behavior.

Worth noting: Male elk are called bulls, and female elk "favor bulls with large antlers," according to the zoo. The zoo's literature says nothing about the preferences of lesbian elk.


Asian elephant (Elephas maximus)

Initial behavior: Minimal.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Subject takes two steps, then halts.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject defecates while remaining otherwise stationary.

Worth noting: "A[n elephant] trunk weighs about 400 pounds," according to the zoo, "and is so dexterous that it can pick up a grain of rice."


Reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata)

Initial behavior: Attending hay bale.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Apparent confusion followed by resumed attendance to hay bale.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subjects take notice of audio and continue feeding.

Worth noting: "A giraffe's tongue is over 18 inches long."


Palawan peacock pheasant (Polyplectron emphanum)

Initial behavior: Strutting.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Strutting.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Strutting.


Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus)

Initial behavior: Forlornly gazing at visitors through window.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Forlorn gazing continues.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Subject yawns widely and looks away.


Mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus)

Initial behavior: Posing stoically with soiled beard atop outcropping of artificial rock formation.

Reaction to Pecknold on the cover of Spin: Posing stoically with soiled beard atop outcropping of artificial rock formation.

Reaction to Helplessness Blues: Posing stoically with soiled beard atop outcropping of artificial rock formation.

Worth noting: A group of mountain goats is called a band. "One change in bedding position by the most dominant nanny might result in conflicts within the whole band," according to the zoo. recommended