Clarke Wilson
Finding scruffy, sexy young bands that sound like AC/DC isn't challenging, but it's nice to come across one that embodies that band's best quality: dirty, bombastic blues-rock delivered with minimal flashiness. Clarke Wilson, bassist and vocalist for Those Peabodys, chatted with me in the wee hours while preparing to leave Austin, Texas for the band's U.S. spring tour. They'll play the Crocodile on Thursday, April 25 with Popular Shapes and the Intelligence.

Do the AC/DC comparisons get tiring, or do you find them to be accurate? "AC/DC is a great band. I think we get that comparison a lot because we're from Texas and we all used to drive tow trucks."

What's the best example of a white artist pulling off a blues song effectively? The worst? "I really like British Invasion-type covers of blues songs--the Animals, the Kinks, the Stones.... The worst kind of blues--black, white, red, or yellow--is that Stevie Ray Vaughan. I just don't fucking get it. Those hats were so nasty. The music is so shiny and covered with sequins. Yuck."

What's the best thrift store find you've made recently? "I got this cool Electric Mud record. It's Muddy Waters in the late '60s doing these bizarre versions of his own songs. I don't think he played guitar on the whole album, but it is so awesome. It was 99 cents. Score!"

The TV newsmagazine 48 Hours just did a big story on the dangers of band vans on the road. Is your vehicle safe and secure, or do we have to worry about you kids making it to Seattle with all your limbs attached? "We actually signed to McDonald's new record label recently. They were looking for some street cred, so we swallowed it and agreed. McRecords has been really cool to us, so we just ride in their semi trucks. It kinda sucks because we have to stop and drop off food at every McDonald's in the area, and it's kind of cold--but we are definitely safe back there."

Interview by Hannah Levin

Support The Stranger

Sponsored
Washington Ensemble Theatre presents amber, a sensory installation set in the disco era
In this 30-minute multimedia experience, lights & sounds guide groups as they explore a series of immersive spaces.