Josephine Pryde
WEDNESDAY 7/3

THE JUAN MACLEAN WILL HOUSE YOU (AND MAYBE UNCLOTHE YOU)

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Frankly, we'd rather see the Juan MacLean (aka John MacLean) play live (did you catch that 2009 gig at Nectar? Holy shit!), but a DJ set by the former Six Finger Satellite guitarist is not a bad consolation prize. The New York City–based DFA Records mainstay is a keen selector of house and disco, invariably dropping the subtly soulful and classily propulsive cuts. Let's hope he's not too humble to spin his own anthem/self-fulfilling prophecy, "Happy House." With J-Justice and Introcut. Barboza, 8 pm, $13, 21+.

THURSDAY 7/4

AIRPORT'S OMINOUS, ASTRAL DISCO, YOURYOUNGBODY'S ELECTRONIC TORCH SONGS

Airport (aka Jayson Kochan) keeps playing local shows at a furious rate, and I keep writing about 'em. Maybe one of these times it'll slice through your seemingly impenetrable apathy, and you'll finally check out one of Seattle's most riveting producers. Airport's specialty is propulsive astral disco that balances ominous atmospheres with uplifting, occasionally whimsical melodies. It's irrepressibly groovy and infectious and ready for much bigger venues than it's heretofore occupied. Seattle duo youryoungbody traffic in slower tempos and broodier moods and feature Emily Cripe's rich, velvety vocals, which are steeped in disciplined torch-song theatrics. Producer Killian Brom's a skillful songwriter; KEXP dubbed youryoungbody's "Sterile" as song of the day in May. With Leatherdaddy and Imperials. Comet, 9 pm, $6, 21+.

HEATSICK, LEE GAMBLE, and NHK'KOYXEN TRIGGER AVANT-TECHNO PAN-DEMONIUM

Three artists from Bill Kouligas's revered Berlin label PAN invade Seattle tonight, and it's totally worth skipping whatever Fourth of July shindig you're planning to hit. Japanese producer NHK'Koyxen (Kouhei Matsunaga, who also records for Raster-Noton) makes ruggedly glitched yet scrupulously designed techno that's hard to mix smoothly with most other techno—a plus, in my view. Kouhei's a master of abstract minimalism transferred to club dimensions, and his productions are always a head-wrecking delight. By contrast, Heatsick (Steven Warwick) takes the familiar traits of early techno and house and runs them through a distancing, decadent filter, giving his tracks a crucial tang of oddness. And his cover of "Willow's Song" from The Wicker Man soundtrack out-creeps Bill Callahan. Lee Gamble's brand of left-field techno and otherworldly ambient is way more warped than that of Warp Records' stable these days. These PAN dudes are such the inventive rule-breakers. With Phine Gage and Phaedrus. Electric Tea Garden, 9 pm, $10, 21+.