LCD Soundsystem's "All My Friends" is a great last song of the night any night—an uplifting, sentimental toast to fleeting good times and friends—but it's fucking brilliant as a last song ever. Wednesday was, as mentioned last week, the final Ruff Gemz, and, yes, conflict of interest, blah blah blah, but it was a blast, and that song was a perfect coda. It was also an early, auspicious start to a long, drunken weekend.


Before Thursday night's Drop the Lime show, Luca Venezia, Club Pop's Colby B, Glitterpants, and Michael Yuasa, DJ Recess, and others grabbed dinner at Cafe Presse. Topics of conversation: the (presumably small) phenomenon of real bands making money off virtual concerts in online nerd-iverse Second Life, and the mass exodus of fans immediately after Justice's live set in Seattle and how they all missed out on Mehdi and de Rosnay's killer post-show DJ set. For the record, Venezia is not dying to break into the virtual-music industry, and everyone agrees that Justice's audience missed what might have been the most fun part of their show.

That night's Club Pop, the event's first fortnightly edition, was a qualified success. It wasn't as crowded as it could've been, and due to some industry pecking-order bullshit Le Castle Vania headlined over Drop the Lime's superior set. Drop the Lime's performance was relatively pop and friendly, with Venezia jumping around and doing his damndest on the mic to hype up the crowd. Le Castle Vania's set was fine, an energetic mix of popular electro, with none of the blown-out bass that marred his last Chop Suey appearance. But, still, Drop the Lime has made how many records? On how many respected labels? For how many years? And Le Castle Vania has what? Two remixes and two original tracks to his name? Connections with DJ Kid Millionaire? That hoodie? It was a fun night all around, and Le Castle Vania's DJ set wasn't bad, but Drop the Lime's set would've absolutely destroyed the place if he'd only gone on after midnight.


No complaints for Friday night, which boasted both a brutally psychedelic, rod-and-cone-toasting performance from Black Dice and the all-local "I <3 Seattle" group hug installment of Broken Disco. At the always all-ages Vera Project, an informal survey of peers (rather than the youths) revealed that the preferred state in which to see Black Dice is lightly stoned. Indeed, that is the ideal state in which to see Black Dice. The band's new material is more light and rhythmic than the minimal drones of their past, and it was far more engaging live (the highlight of their set with Animal Collective back in 2004 was that I'm fairly sure I saw one of the guys eating a hoagie onstage midsong). The band's not much to watch—a lot of hunched over nodding and knob twisting—but they played in front of a throbbing, mutating, color-saturated digital video mandala that perfectly animated their feedback swells and busted grooves.

Broken Disco's "I <3 Seattle" showcase really did bring together an impressive array of local talent. Highlights included Plan B's downtempo compositions for laptop and violin—which combined subdued breaks, beautiful live melody, and gentle loops and programming to achieve a something not unlike Mum's elfin electronica—and Jerry Abstract's relentless live set. Navigating between rooms and bars proved too difficult to catch Same DNA's DJ set in the make-out lounge, despite a friend's recommendation, and navigating between drinks proved too difficult to remember much of NAHA's set. Presumably, she was awesome as usual.

After hours, under the freeway, Scientific American played a more-populist/less-altered set than usual to a small but appreciative crowd, while Pretty Titty and Fourcolorzack rocked a 2x4 set upstairs.


Saturday. Still standing. Barely. A routine trip to the Cha Cha was sidetracked by the massive party next door at Caffe Vita. Sunday Night Blackout was onstage and projected on screens around the room. The drinks were free, but the pizza had run out, and the Presidents of the United States of America were done. The lights came on after one last round, and a few people—local music booster Dave Meinert, divisive One Pot mastermind Michael Hebberoy, among others—made their way to an after-hours pizza party down the street. It was delicious.


In non-binge-related news, longtime Showbox booker Chad Queirolo dismisses last week's anonymous e-mail, purportedly from a Showbox employee, regarding rumors of the historic venue's tenuous hold on its location at the Market as just that—rumor. "The Showbox isn't going away anytime soon," Queirolo says. "Seriously, those rumors were there when I started in 2000."

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Finally, M.I.A. is sold out, but you can always try to make it to the official M.I.A. afterparty at Sing Sing featuring Hollertronix alum Low Budget and maybe the least surprising "super secret surprise guest" imaginable. recommended

egrandy@thestranger.com