Excellent

LITTLE ORPHAN ANI

TYLENOL TALENT

STUPID BLOODY STUPID!

Interview

All the News That Didn't Fit

On the Record

The Olympia Connection, Or Lack Thereof

Excellent

The Numbness Is Just a Bonus

Hiphop City

WEEN ARE THE WORLD

Soul by the Pound

EXCELLENT REAL ROCK QUOTES

Incest is Best

The Rise and Fall of the N-Word

DEXYS MIDNIGHT RUNNERS

If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say, Tell the Truth Anyway

You Don't Own Me

Summer Lovin'

Stagger Lee

Music to Lose Your Job By

Boy, You Sure Can Take the Fun Out of Music

CINEMATIC CLICHE

Stuart Braithwaite From Mogwai

Going to New York City?

THE CHURCH OF COLTRANE

A Whole N'other Level

Who Says Morrissey Fans Don't Get Laid?

ISSA ROCKA ROLL

Not Modest Enough

A music snob is anyone who can't distinguish between subjective opinions and objective reality. And Seattle is full of folks who believe their taste defines right and wrong. I can't respect a music snob who makes judgments of others based on bands. It's one thing to passionately admire or despise a band, and another thing, for example, to dismiss all Sky Cries Mary fans.

An offshoot of this kind of music snobbery has become an issue in Seattle recently. In a town noted for band-hopping, side projects, and cross-pollination, musicians are disowning their pasts for fear that music snobs won't give their new bands a chance.

Kinski is a new-ish local band who have just released a foggy, enveloping debut CD, and played several knockout shows in the past few months. Kinski's dirty little secret is that their lead singer/guitarist, Chris Martin, used to be in the power-pop band the Deflowers. Kinski have made an effort to divorce themselves from that connection, which is natural since the bands have divergent sounds. But the subtext is this: If Seattle music snobs knew of the connection to the Deflowers, they might not give Kinski a fair chance.

Even more of an indictment is the case of the Now. They played their first show at the Crocodile last month, and immediately became The Impressive New Seattle Band. And their spastic drummer, the life of the Now party, is also in -- shhh! -- '80s cover band the Beatniks. No one respects the Beatniks, but that fact shouldn't diminish your willingness to check out the Now. It's perfectly logical that the musicians in an '80s cover band would also have real bands. And the one shouldn't reflect poorly on the other: If the drummer was creatively fulfilled by playing in the Beatniks, he wouldn't need to be in the Now, now would he? Musicians need day jobs, and doing what you love in a band you don't care about beats doing something you hate in an office you don't care about.

When done in jest, music snobbery can be funny. But if it would stop you from going to see really superlative local bands like the Now or Kinski, as the bands themselves seem to fear it would, then it's a sad and ignorant prejudice that hurts not only yourself but the music community.