Excellent

LITTLE ORPHAN ANI

TYLENOL TALENT

STUPID BLOODY STUPID!

Interview

All the News That Didn't Fit

On the Record

The Olympia Connection, Or Lack Thereof

Excellent

The Numbness Is Just a Bonus

Hiphop City

WEEN ARE THE WORLD

Soul by the Pound

EXCELLENT REAL ROCK QUOTES

Incest is Best

The Rise and Fall of the N-Word

DEXYS MIDNIGHT RUNNERS

If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say, Tell the Truth Anyway

You Don't Own Me

Summer Lovin'

Stagger Lee

Music to Lose Your Job By

Boy, You Sure Can Take the Fun Out of Music

CINEMATIC CLICHE

Stuart Braithwaite From Mogwai

Going to New York City?

THE CHURCH OF COLTRANE

A Whole N'other Level

Who Says Morrissey Fans Don't Get Laid?

ISSA ROCKA ROLL

Not Modest Enough

In 1979, Sony co-founders Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka debuted the Sony Walkman.

In 1985, my parents gave me my first Walkman for my birthday. It was big and bulky and took two AA batteries. There was no "bass booster," not even a rewind; only fast forward (evidently I had received the cheap-ass version). Up until that point, music had never really been a big part of my life. But once the Walkman arrived and music became something I could keep private, away from my parents, I started listening to music incessantly.

One of the joys of a Walkman, I soon discovered, was the ability to listen to one song over and over again without driving others mad. I would stop the Walkman after a song was over, eject, flip the tape, and hit fast forward. During trips in the family car, this was all you would hear -- click, eject, click, eject, click -- until my parents would holler at me to stop before I broke it. Eventually, they were right. It broke.

Prisoners of war are often brainwashed through repetition. Seeing the same images, listening to the same sounds for days on end breaks a person down, makes their mind pliable.

Listening to a song over and over again has the same effect on me, only in a good way. Taking a walk, or sitting at my desk working, the same song repeating in my ears becomes a sort of soundtrack to my life. My mind becomes pliable and I'm usually at my most creative (my song of choice right now is Folk Implosion's "Serge" -- a catchy spy-tune-like instrumental off their new album).

Thanks to Sony, I can brainwash myself whenever I want -- one of the many small things that often makes life bearable.