READINGS


THURSDAY 1/25


*WILLIAM KITTREDGE

Missoula-based author Kittredge's latest memoir, The Nature of Generosity, continues on with the kind of personal and philosophical investigations found in Hole in the Sky, his earlier account of growing up and running the family ranch in southeastern Oregon. "Kittredge is the child of people who conquered the land," writes Thomas McGuane, "but he hears the voices of its original inhabitants and he knows what went under the plow, because he helped put it there." Elliott Bay Book Company, 101 S Main, 624-6600, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


JEREMY S. SNAPP

Slide show, discussion, and book-signing by the author of Destiny by Design: The Construction of the Panama Canal, a photo-historical account that spans the years prior to the opening of the passage up to 1999, when the U.S. ceded canal authority back to Panama. Museum of History & Industry, 2700 24th Ave E, 634-3400, 7 pm, free with museum admission.


DAVID CROW

Life on this coughing, choking planet grows more toxic by the minute, with killer diseases and mutating viruses springing up as fast or faster than modern science can find a cure. (Malaria, for instance, now transmogrifies itself so quickly that immunizations are updated on a monthly basis.) With all this enviro-physiological nastiness, some folks feel that it's time we gave the findings of ethnomedicine a shot. In 1987, Crow--a former acupuncturist--traveled to Katmandu to study traditional Ayurvedic approaches to healing, and his new book, In Search of the Medicine Buddha, is an exhaustive study of the roots and uses of Tibetan alchemical knowledge. Bastyr University Auditorium, 14500 Juanita Drive, 425-602-3026, noon and 7 pm, free.


TIM POWERS

Reading and book-signing by the author of Declare, a Cold War thriller that Dean Koontz says is "packed with historical fact, flights of imagination, and wonderful suspense." University Bookstore, 4325 University Way NE, 634-3400, 7 pm, free.


FRIDAY 1/26


ANITA ENDREZZE

Endrezze is a local award-winning poet whose new book, Throwing Fire at the Sun, Water at the Moon, is a collection of verse, fiction, and essays largely inspired by Yaqui myth and lore. "Endrezze's work helps us gain insight not only into the particulars she deals with but also into ourselves and our fellow human beings," says Janet Campbell Hale, while Ron Mader calls the collection "an eclectic tome that blurs the stories of the Virgin of Guadalupe and Coyote Woman.... Highly recommended." Elliott Bay Book Company, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS

Discussion and book-signing by the author of Socrates Café, a book that seeks to revive the ironic investigatory methods of ancient Greece's most petulant gadfly. Cafe Solstice, 4116 University Way NE, 634-3400, 7 pm, free.


SATURDAY 1/27


*DOE TABOR

Tabor's debut novel, Do Drums Beat There, is a fictional reconstruction of the 1973 American Indian takeover of Alcatraz Island, narrated by a young Lakota woman. "[Tabor] is a writer unafraid of big subjects," says Barbara Wilson, "and a compassionate observer of small pains as well as large wrongs." Elliott Bay Book Company, 5 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


HUGO HOUSE READING CIRCLE

Local writers read and discuss works on the topic of "Landscapes." Hosted by writer-in-residence Joan Fiset, author of the poetry collection Now The Day is Over. Stimulating, casual, free, and open to the public. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave, 322-7030, 3 pm, free.


ROBERT GOVER

When it was first published 40 years ago, Gover's satirical novel One Hundred Dollar Misunderstanding was praised by such diverse writers as Gore Vidal and Henry Miller for its bawdy lampooning of just about everything. Herbert Gold of The New York Times had this to say: "Like Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita and J. P. Donleavy's The Ginger Man, Robert Gover has written a 'special' book, a freak of a novel...." Elliott Bay Book Company, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY BOOKCLUB

Discussion of the late, great Murray Morgan's book, Skid Road: An Informal Portrait of Seattle. Museum of History & Industry, 11 am, free with admission.


SHARON CARTON

A British lawyer turned mystery writer, Carton signs her debut thriller, Sometimes You Get Killed. Seattle Mystery Bookshop, 117 Cherry St, 587-5737, noon, free.


SUNDAY 1/28


JAMES ELKINS

University of Chicago art professor and critic Elkins' latest book, How to Use Your Eyes, delves into the complicated activity of looking and beholding. "If the doors of perception were cleansed, as Blake used to insist," writes Lawrence Weschler, "we'd see the world as it truly is, which is to say, infinite. Leaving aside its vitalizing bounty of particular revelations, what Elkins is really offering with this marvelous book is nothing less that Murine for the mind, Windex for the soul." (Now that's some corny hyperbole!) Henry Art Gallery Auditorium, 15th Ave NE & 41st St, 634-3400, 2 pm, free with admission.


*TITLEWAVE READING SERIES

Featured readers at this installment of Titlewave are local poet Danika Dinsmore, writer/editor Todd Matthews, and Stranger writer Emily Hall (she'll be reading her fiction). Lori Goldston of Black Cat Orchestra will play her cello. Hosted by Doug Nufer. Titlewave Books, 7 Mercer St, 324-6379, 7:30 pm, free.


FOURTH ANNUAL SUPER BOWL OF POETRY

The Northwest Spokenword LAB (SPLAB!) puts on its annual "alternative to the football game," a literary event that will feature readings by Stephen Thomas, Judith Roche, George Quasha, Lissa Wolsak, Melissa Noelle Green, and Tim Sanders. Moderated by Paul Nelson of It Plays in Peoria Productions. SPLAB!, 14 S Division, Auburn, 253-735-MEAT, 2 pm, $10 suggested donation.


THREE POETS & OPEN MIC

Special Tacoma Poets reading featuring Glenna Cook, Ian Lamberton, and Kelly Richstein. Wit's End Bookstore & Tea Shop, 770 N 34th St, 682-1268, 7 pm, free.


GEORGE QUASHA & CHARLES STEIN

Stein and Quasha are the featured readers at this installment of Red Sky Poetry Theatre. Open mic sign-ups begin at 7 pm, sharp. Globe Cafe, 1531 14th Ave, 633-5647, 7:30 pm, free.


MONDAY 1/29


JAMES ELKINS

See Sunday listing. Elliott Bay Book Company, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


TUESDAY 1/30


*VOICES FROM THE HOLOCAUST

Seattle Central Community College presents an important open-to-the-public lecture series based on the Holocaust and its survivors. This week, author Thomas Blatt will speak about his 1943 escape from Nazi death camp Sobibor--the only successful escape from a death camp during all of WWII. SCCC, 1701 Broadway, 587-2924, 11 am, free.


*RAMACHANDRA GUHA

Dr. Guha, a MacArthur Research and Writing Fellow and author of The Unquiet Woods, will speak on the subject of "Environmental Philosophies: How Sustainable Are They?" as part of the UW's Walker-Ames Lecture Series. Kane Hall, UW campus, 616-1825, 6 pm, free.


THOMAS A. PRESTON, M.D.

A Seattle physician and former UW professor of medicine, Thomas' latest book is Final Victory: Taking Charge of the Last Stages of Life, Facing Death on Your Own Terms. "A sensible, sensitive guide for the end of life," says Betty Rollin. "Everything I really want and need to know about the inevitable end of life is here in this book," says the eternally self-promoting local brewer of coffee table pseudo-philosophy, Robert Fulghum. (It's all about you, baby!) Elliott Bay Book Company, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


CATHERINE RYAN HYDE

Hyde (author of Pay It Forward) will read from and sign her latest book, Electric God, a modern reinterpretation of the Book of Job. University Bookstore, 7 pm, free.


WEDNESDAY 1/31


GITHA HARIHARAN

Hariharan is a writer from New Delhi who, as part of the "A World of Words" program, will serve as a writer-in-residence at Hedgebrook on Whidbey Island. Over the course of her stay, she will also spend time working with students in Seattle public schools. Hariharan's books include the novel When Dreams Travel, the short story collection The Art of Dying and the 1993 winner of Commonweath's Best First Book Award, The Thousand Faces of Night. Elliott Bay Book Company, 7:30 pm, tickets required (available free at store).


JOHN J. RATEY, M.D.

Reading and book-signing by author of A User's Guide to the Brain: Personality, Behavior, and the Four Theaters of the Brain. University Bookstore, 7 pm, free.


*THE MOVIE GENERATION LECTURE SERIES

UW professor emeritus of history Jon Bridgman will discuss "The Great Depression & The Great Escape," the fourth in a series of six lectures on cinema and society. Kane Hall, UW campus, 7 pm, $12 general/$10 students & UWAA members.

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