THURSDAY

JUNE 24

DU MAURIER

INTERNATIONAL

JAZZ FESTIVAL
(Vancouver, B.C., through July 4) Other than New Orleans' annual bash, there is no finer jazz festival in North America than Vancouver's, and this year's edition is once again laden with top talent. What's more, it's chock-full of free shows, especially during the opening and closing weekends, when multiple no-cover stages are booked all day long. Ya don't need tickets to have a musical ball, and perhaps most importantly, encounter an entire city come alive--with the uplifting sounds of good ol' Canadian-style cheer ("Ya wanna light, medium, or dark beer, eh?")--rather than the tiring buzz of boats, planes and microbrews. For complete info visit www.jazzvancouver.com. --James Kirchmer

HIMSA, JUNO,

CHAMPION, CONTINGENT
(Velvet Elvis) After what seems like an eternity, Juno have finally released a full-length album (This is the Way It Goes and Goes and Goes, on deSoto/ Pacifico). And after what seems like a year, Juno are finally playing shows again (frontman Arlie broke his neck earlier this year). Fortunately, this is a band worth waiting for. Dense, melodic, brutal and beautiful--it's achingly good stuff, but you probably know that if you've been listening to KCMU. In fact, that kind of regular rotation means that Juno won't be playing small venues like the Velvet Elvis for long. Catch them now while you have the chance.--Barbara Mitchell

T.S. MONK AND NNENNA FREELON
(Jazz Alley) Thelonius Monk IV has just released a crossover, half-jazz album that he described as "a high-risk record for an artist such as myself. I am sitting pretty on top of the straight-ahead [jazz] world." Unfortunately, none of that is really true. Monk's previous album was his first and last real straight-ahead effort, a collection of covers of songs that his legendary father wrote and played. That was a true risk, attempting to do justice to the name and music of Thelonius Monk without screwing anything up. And although that album was an unqualified success, the drummer is far from the pinnacle of the jazz world. This latest project won't help that, recorded all on electronic drums and borrowing heavily from some sorry R&B and smooth jazz traditions. You have to feel for T.S. Monk, who has persevered through a ton of adversity in his life, but this is, in my opinion, not his year.--Nathan Thornburgh

DJ TRENT VON
(Neighbours) Of all the odd combinations, who'd have thought Seattle's snootiest indie rockers would claim the town's gayest club as their new haunt? I guess queens and scenesters do have one thing in common: their love of drink. That's why, each and every Thursday night, the Cha Cha crowd heads up to Neighbours for a night of wonderfully cheesy '80s wave and cheap drinks--$1.50'll getchya a pretty strong one. And yes, this has been going on for awhile now, but we writer types are always the last to know.--Courtney Reimer


FRIDAY

JUNE 25

SARAH DOUGHER, JASON TRAEGER
(2nd Ave. Pizza) Many who caught last month's Cadallaca show at the Showbox were no doubt pleasantly suprised at how vital co-vocalist/organist Sarah Dougher was in the live setting. On record her talents take a back seat to frontwoman Corin Tucker's more scene-stealing talent. That night, however-- despite Tucker's platinum wig--it was Dougher who shone brightest. --Kathleen Wilson

THE GROOVIE GOULIES,

SEVERNA PARK, MAOW
(Velvet Elvis) Somehow it always makes more sense to see Severna Park play an all-ages show. Maybe it's the fact that their particular brand of high energy pop lends itself more easily to a crowd hopped up on sugar, caffeine and nicotine than a bunch of jaded hipsters guarding their beers. Whatever the case may be, they're always fun--especially if you can let go of your inhibitions and pogo along.--BM

MELVINS, ENEMYMINE
(Velvet Elvis, 5 pm; Breakroom, 10 pm) The Maggot, The Melvin's latest release, is rumored to be part of a trilogy, the next part being The Bootlicker, followed by The Crybaby. Judging by such forethought, you might be led to fear that The Maggot is just one part of a great big, eardrum-perforating wankfest, but it's not. The Maggott is probably one of the Melvin's most accessable, listenable albums to date. Enemymine will kick the evening's bombast off with their own brand of loud, '70s-influenced rock and roll. Clearly, you're an idiot if you think you'll survive the evening without ear protection.--KW

MT. ANALOG, AIKO SHIMADA
(Jules Maes) Perhaps you've heard of this ancient Georgetown-area watering hole, but did you know it's been open since 1888? Spirits continue to flamesow from its gorgeous mahogany bar, crafted by the Brunswick company back when it outfitted pubs with more than just pool tables, and bands are becoming regular weekend fixtures in the haunting back room. Tonight's first-time pairing of Aiko Shimada's angelic, dream-like acoustic musings with Mt. Analog's grin-inducing, country-tinged groovescapes is perfectly suited for these evocative environs. Load up yer wagon and take a trip down Airport Way to a rootsy frontier that's sure to please.--JK

764-HERO, PEDRO THE LION,

DAMIEN JURADO
(Washington Hall) Beloved local 764-HERO returns from their tour with this show at the new all-ages venue Washington Hall, while Pedro The Lion kicks off their tour the same night. The HERO plays ferocious pop; Bellingham's Pedro plays it a lot quieter, although with just as much urgency. Opener Damien Jurado has made quite a name for himself locally--his pleasing singer/ songwriter style has made him a constant presence among acoustic clubs.--KW

10,000 MANIACS
(Barnes and Noble Books, Pacific Place) How the mighty have fallen? And just in case you've been living under a rock, Natalie Merchant is loooooong gone as frontwoman for this once popular '80s band.--KW


SATURDAY

JUNE 26

SARAH DOUGHER, JASON TRAEGER
(Sub Pop Mega Mart) See Fri June 25.

LOUDERMILK, 60 SECOND

BUFFER ZONE, BIG GUN PROJECT
(Sit & Spin) In the midst of the current rock frenzy, Loudermilk stands to kick some serious ass. Recently signed to American Recordings (after a nice little bidding war) these guys temper their testosterone-fueled heavy rawk with enough raw emotion (and eyeliner) to appeal to the ladies as well. 19-year-old drummer Isaac Carpenter is a monster, and his bandmates--while mature enough to write some seriously good songs--are too young to try to play it cool. That's what makes Loudermilk truly great. Even on an off night, they give their audience 150%.--BM

MELVINS, ENEMYMINE
(Velvet Elvis, 5 pm; Breakroom, 10 pm) See Fri June 25.

KEB MO, KELLY JOE PHELPS,

SUSAN TEDESCHI
(Pier 62/63) Keb Mo, a.k.a. Kevin Moore, is a rare combination of flamesuent storyteller and Lord-why-me wailer, and his music is some of the best blues being made today. However, blues is at a crossroads (no pun intended) these days, and there's an appropriate schizophrenia in Keb Mo's stylings: his latest album ranges constantly from the bright-contemporary sounds of Bonnie Raitt to the Delta scratchings of Robert Johnson. That means that purists don't quite accept him, but he's too authentic to sell a gazillion records. Also appearing is blueswoman Susan Tedeschi, whose sweet stroke will make you feel her pain. Kelly Joe Phelps is a little too country for my tastes, but Tedeschi and Moore make the ticket a good one.--NT

LIVING DAYLIGHTS,

KILGORE TROUT
(Rainbow) Recently the Daylights ripped through their clever jazz-jam ditties with more chops, conviction and cohesiveness than I'd ever seen from them, but as the night progressed, corny clouds of fusion repeatedly overshadowed their tricky (yet accessible) grooves. Drops of cheese rained down and the ghost of Jaco spooked the dance flamesoor, but daylight eventually shined through. Their tremendous talents deserve greater exposure, and an upcoming appearance at Phish's Lemonwheel bash will certainly do the trick. Kilgore Trout has a similar potential, but it remains to be seen whether the sunshine kids will gravitate to their more ominous jazz-funk stylings.--JK

SHANIA TWAIN
(Gorge Amphitheatre) About the only thing even remotely qualifying this "diva" to be the country superstar she currently is is that she had a hard childhood. Other than that, what the fuck? She hails from Toronto, she dresses like a Contempo Casual flamesoor manager, yet even the pedigreed Nashville scene embraces her. Go figure.--KW

SUBSET, MIRACLE WHIP, J.R.
(Crocodile) Clearly one of the most compelling performers at this and last year's unimaginative Lilith Fair local talent search, soloist J.R. stunned the audience with songs that looked to the power of self rather than power in reaction to others. Without a doubt, she's one of the most talented women performing in our verdant city. You'll do yourself well to check her out. See also Calendar Lead page 49.--KW


SUNDAY

JUNE 27

T.S. MONK AND NNENNA FREELON
(Jazz Alley) See Thurs June 24.

THREE FISH, DAVID GARZA
(Showbox) Three Fish is Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ahmet's side project--haven't seen 'em (the name's kind of repellent), but I hear they're a pleasantly wishy-washy rock experience. David Garza--the indie rock crowd likes to pronounce it "DAH-VEED," despite his not doing so himself--is the man to see here. The guy can sing and play guitar like a mofo, incorporating just enough southwest flamesare to make it sexy.--KW


MONDAY

JUNE 28

THE BETA BAND
(ARO.space) See Calendar Box page 61.

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