THURSDAY

AUGUST 5

FACE TO FACE, JIMMY EAT WORLD
(RKCNDY) I have this theory that "emo-core" is really the late-90s equivalent of the 80s moody pop movement (think the Cure and the Smiths) -- songs about alienation sung by white guys with guitars and dyed black hair to cult audiences who know every word to every song and consider the lyrics poetry. Which is a good thing! (Except y'all might consider taking sartorial cues from Mr. Smith and Co.) Jimmy Eat World are standouts in the emo scene. Their latest album, Clarity, is a heartbreakingly good blend of sadness and cynicism with crystalline production. There's an urgency and raw emotion to the live performances that make this a show you won't want to miss. -- Barbara Mitchell

GUYS WHO LOVE GUITARS
(Crocodile) The title almost suggests a bunch of Yngwie-worshipping wank-offs, but tonight's line-up couldn't be much further from that. Check out a rare acoustic performance by lead Supersucker Eddie Spaghetti and an appearance by new Seattle resident Ian Moore. The stand-out, tried and true artists on the bill, though, are local treasures Gerald Collier and John Wesley Harding. Both deliver stellar songwriting with just the right balance of dry wit and poignancy. Finally, a chance to hear all the words.... -- BM

HOVERCRAFT,

REPLIKANTS, FCS NORTH
(Breakroom) See Calendar Box page 51.

MARC OLSEN
(Gordon Biersch) Yeah, Gordon Biersch is in a mall, but as far as mall bars go, it ain't so bad, especially when one of Seattle's better singer/songwriters is warming the stool on stage. Olsen's softly sung tunes are the type that hit you deep inside, pull you in, and and make you listen -- even if you are the kind of person who shops at Pacific Place, rather than just passing through it on your way up to the movie theater. -- Kathleen Wilson


FRIDAY

AUGUST 6

THE HEATS
(Seattle Center & Ballard Firehouse) The young-uns won't remember, but Seattle did have its own version of the Knack once upon a time -- the Heats. Starting out as the Heaters, later shortened to the Heats, the group hit Seattle clubs in 1978 with danceable power- pop, British Invasion-style two-part harmonies, and, amazingly enough, original songs. Hyped as the next big thing, it was all over by 1983. But reunion fever eventually bites everyone, and the Heats are no exception; following last year's release of the band's Smoke on Chuckie-Boy, the band has live shows set for Fri Aug 6 at the Seattle Center's Mural Amphitheatre and the Ballard Firehouse later that night and again the following night. Rave on. -- Gillian G. Gaar

JULIAN LENNON, PUSH STARS
(Crocodile) Julian Lennon's back with a new record called Photograph Smile that's pretty listenable, yet distractingly uneven. There's plenty of pretty tunes that hark back to Paul McCartney rather than John Lennon, and some beautiful strings to back things up, but a couple of the sappier tunes are ultimately over the top. That won't matter for this special live appearance at the Crocodile, however. This show will be a rare treat -- whatever Lennon chooses to sing. -- KW

PARADOX
(Call for location: 206-517-2605) Our city has some damn fine DJs and electronic-music producers. They don't come out often, so you gotta catch 'em when you can. Like here, for instance. The bill includes Resonance magazine's Kuri Kondrak, who's rumored to be one of the best DJs in town, but is very selective about where and when he plays, so he remains one of the city's better-kept secrets. Also among the evening's disc selectors is The Stranger's own Matt Corwine, who promises to play us "all the badass techno records [he] spent all [his] money on in New York." Playing live are Emmetropik, Clutch, and Bright, all of whom are unsigned, in case you industry types care to see what you've been missing. -- Courtney Reimer

YERBA BUENA, DJ CEBRINA
(Century Ballroom) Cuban music's resurgent stateside popularity hit me especially hard last year, when I found a big bin of Buena Vista Social Club discs at Costco. Yerba Buena's members are longtime devotees and, although their 12-piece charanga orchestra ain't world-class, it's definitely solid, and the only one in town. An early arrival (8 pm) nets you a super-cool, one-hour dance lesson (for only $5 extra) with Roberto Borrell, a former member of Cuba's National Folkloric Ensemble. -- James Kirchmer


SATURDAY

AUGUST 7

THE GAUCHO,

WITH ACCOMPANIMENT BY

THE DEGENERATE ART ENSEMBLE
(Gasworks Park) Part of a run of free movie screenings taking place every Friday & Saturday 'til Aug 14 (on a 20-by-30 foot movie screen!), this particular evening features the premiere of an original musical score, performed live by Seattle's very own Degenerate Art Ensemble orchestra (formerly known as the Young Composers Collective). As the YCC they put together a great score for Fritz Lang's Metropolis -- so this isn't uncharted territory for them -- and The Gaucho, Douglas Fairbanks' silent classic (made in 1927, the same year Metropolis was hatched), is full of cigarettes, sexual drama, and graceful swashbuckling. It's perfect compositional fodder. Note as well that there's a canned food drive tonight (corn and fruit preferred). The gates open at 6 pm, the music starts at 7 pm, and the film fun starts at dusk. -- JK

JOURNEY, FOREIGNER
(Gorge Amphitheatre) Just 'cause the guy's name is Steve don't mean it's Steve Perry. Just a warning.... -- KW

OLIVIA NEWTON JOHN
(Benaroya Hall) See Live Preview page 37.

PINK MARTINI W/ LA MOVIDA
(Showbox, early show) Portland's Pink Martini are suave, sophisticated, and fun -- the kind of band that inspires the consumption of exotic cocktails and the donning of your most gorgeous finery. In fact, Pink Martini have almost transcended "band" and become "movement," amassing legions of fans with their retro-cool sounds. (Impress your friends with your surplus of culture by playing PM's debut album, Sympathique, at your next gathering.) This will be a see-and-be-seen kind of evening, so get dolled up and come on down. -- BM

QUASI, OCTANT, NO. 2
(Crocodile) See Interview Page 3 of Excellent.

SANFORD ARMS, SHUGGIE,

THE BAND THAT

MADE MILWAUKEE FAMOUS
(Breakroom) After an unexplained hiatus, the local supergroup-who-should is back. Tonight's Sanford Arms appearance -- a command performance initiated by former member/Shuggie mastermind Andrew McKeag -- features former Alcohol Funnycar frontman Ben London and a supporting cast that includes ex-Anodyne/Hammerbox guitarist Harris Thurmond, bassist extraordinaire Jeff Wood, and former Jackie on Acid/Anodyne drummer Rob Dent. Woefully absent from tonight's lineup is the accordion, which perfectly complements the beautifully melancholic feel of the songs. Happily, word has it that the band will be playing more shows soon -- with accordionist in tow. -- BM

SUPER TONIC
(Rainbow) Jovino Santos Neto spent 15 years (1977-93) playing piano and flamesute beside the legendary multi-instrumentalist (and composer) Hermeto Pascoal in his native Brazil -- and he's been in Seattle ever since. Although his own tunes occasionally give me the smooth-jazz willies, there's no question that he's a bitchin' player, and tonight's jam session lineup (starring the likes of La Movida's Elizabeth Pupo-Walker on congas -- a rapidly improving player as of late) will surely bring out his more fiery side. -- JK


SUNDAY

AUGUST 8

ALL THAT MUSIC & MORE FESTIVAL
(The Gorge) I'm tellin' ya, kids have got it too eeeasy these days! When I was just growing hair down there, I never had an all-day music festival featuring my bubblegum pop favorites! But now, thanks to Nickelodeon (the all-kids network), teeny-boppers can enjoy a day at the Gorge with such squeal-worthy faves as 98 Degrees, Tatyana Ali, Monica, B*Witched, and No Authority, as well as a bunch of crazy booths where they dump green slime on your head. And even though it's geared for kids, you can bet your sweet ass I'll be there! (After all, who's going to teach them how to drop acid, form a mosh pit, and collapse from heat prostration?) -- Wm. Steven Humphrey


MONDAY

AUGUST 9

JACOB FRED JAZZ ODYSSEY,

EMMANUEL LOUIS, INSULT2INJURY
(700 Club) The Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey's natural spontaneity, humor, and classical training allows 'em to deliver a truly fresh musical package, and like quintessential '90s jazzmen, they thrive on improvising new ways to bring it home, on time, every time. After all, jazz is about spirit, and these young, Tulsa-based die-hards have got plenty of personality. They've also got a cool new release on Accurate, the home of Morphine and Medeski Martin & Wood's debut discs. Catch 'em tomorrow as well, at a 3 pm Cellophane (U-Dist) in-store, or with our very own (and similarly vibrant) Rockin' Teenage Combo at the Rainbow. -- JK

SKUNK ANANSIE
(ARO.space) Skunk Anansie are the kind of band who look great on paper. They're a hard rock band fronted by a striking, charismatic black lesbian with a shaved head. And despite all of my PC tendencies, I have to say that they're really pretty boring -- I mean, I just told you all of the things that make them even remotely interesting. Which is a shame, because it feels like there's some real talent there. -- BM


TUESDAY

AUGUST 10

OCTANT, DJ KING PANG
(HI-Score) Octant's celebrating the release of their recorded debut, Shock-No-Par, on Up records tonight, but no reason's needed to justify goin' nuts for this wonderful part-human, part-robot band, led by Satisfact/Mocket frontman Matt Steinke. -- KW


WEDNESDAY

AUGUST 11

ALL-STAR TRIBUTE TO JIM PEPPER,

FEATURING DEWEY REDMAN
(Nippon Kan Theatre, 8 pm) The late Jim Pepper, a legendary saxophonist (and Native American), grew up in Portland, OR, and his catchy composition "Witchi-Tai-To" (based on an ancient peyote chant) is now a jazz standard. Most of tonight's core tribute band (guitarist Joel Harrison, pianist/organist Amina Claudine Myers, bassist Kai Eckhardt, drummer Bob Moses) collaborated with him, and Dewey, is said to have been Jim's favorite sax player. Expect a cathartic celebration -- highlighted by some soulful fusions (à la Jim's rootsy adventures and lofty departures) and several special guests. -- JK

BASSACKWARDS
(Rainbow) A recent performance by this "hiphop-jazz-fusion" collective (led by trumpeter Chris Littlefield) found their ace guitarist (Leif Totusek) on stage in a hospital gown, with cumbersome bandages wrapped around his severely burnt hands. Fortunately, he can still play, and will probably make a full recovery. In the meantime, Bassackwards' New York-style instrumentals will continue to please all attendees, as their slammin', horn-laden mix goes down like a good drink -- it ain't watered down one bit. -- JK

G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE
(Pier 62/63) Remember that Mojo Nixon song, "Elvis is Everywhere"? The one where he proclaims that everyone has a little bit of Elvis in 'em -- everybody except the evil opposite of Elvis, the Anti-Elvis? If ol' Mojo wanted to update that song, I'd offer up G. Love & Special Sauce as the new Anti-Elvis, 'cause G. Love ain't got no Elvis in 'im. We're talking a triumph of whitewashed, anglo-friendly groove-pop that makes Cake look positively funky and fresh in comparison. However, if you're looking to meet your chardonnay-sipping, J. Crew-wearing soulmate, this might be a good place to start. -- BM

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