THURSDAY 2/2

JEFF TWEEDY, GLENN KOTCHE
(Moore Theatre) Ahh, Jeff Tweedy. Former singer for '80s alt-country outfit Uncle Tupelo, current singer for Wilco, and one of the best goddamn songwriters in music today. The man wears a lot of hats (and generally looks adorable in all of them) and for his solo tour, concert reviews report that he's been juggling his whole musical history by performing favorites from the Tupelo days along with new and old Wilco tunes. Clearly, the show is going to be wonderful. Nonesuch label mate (and Wilco drummer) Glenn Kotche opens the show. MEGAN SELING

THE GOSSIP, NUMBERS, BOBCATS
(Chop Suey) It may have taken a past shelf-life stab at unabashed disco punk (as well as the addition of Shoplifting drummer Hannah Blilie), but the Gossip have finally made the record that we all knew they had in them—the surprisingly versatile Standing in the Way of Control. Finally freeing themselves of the self-imposed constraints, Control blissfully betrays the wealth of circa '79 influences that have always lingered in the darker corners of guitarist Nathan Howdeshell's playing. ZAC PENNINGTON

MARAH, ADAM & DAVE'S BLOODLINE
(Crocodile) Because it was recorded live in the studio—the way this joyously rocking New York-by-Philadelphia foursome sounds best—Marah's fifth album If You Didn't Laugh, You'd Cry finished right at the top of the 2005 record heap, even though it was far more subdued and folky than the reckless, tension-filled releases of the last decade. But when the swaggering Bielanko brothers (guitarist Serge and singer Dave) bring their spontaneous and remarkably original Lower East Side hootenanny to town, the volume always finds its way to 11 and the blue-collar camaraderie is straight out of E Street Band 101. SCOTT HOLTER

BUCKCHERRY, THE JET CITY FIX, HOMEWRECKER
(El Corazón) Buckcherry: sheep in wolf's clothing; '99 regurgitation of the Sunset Strip scene, featuring tattooed howler, pretty boy Joshua Todd belting out simple, slick, underbaked classic-rockesque ditties. Predictable career trajectory: a couple of CDs, a gigantic fireball of hype, major-label drama, bicker, break up, reform. And, here we are. Fair question: Does anyone care? Hell yeah. Comfort-food rock songs fronted by spazzy, swaggering Southern-Cali-surfer-turned-bad-boy that's all about sex, drugs, and rock and roll? C'mon, admit it, you care, and you have read books for the cover. NES REDNAAJ

FRIDAY 2/3

JAH WOBBLE & THE ENGLISH ROOTS BAND
(El Corazón) See preview, page 34.

LONELY H, THE COPS, GRUFF MUMMIES, THE AUDIOBIOGRAPHY
(Vera Project) See All Ages Action, page 45.

BLIXA BARGELD, SIXTEENS, F-SPACE, LIVING JARBOE
(Triple Door) See Stranger Suggests, page 20.

MUTE MATH, VEDA, MERCIR
(Crocodile) I can't see into the future. Only once did I have a dream that actually came true in real life. Regardless, I'm still comfortable saying Louisiana's Mute Math are gonna see one hell of a year in 2006. Their spacey electro rock is intense and saturated, showing they're just as inspired by DJs as they are rock acts, and then some. And just two days before their Seattle date, the band is the musical guest on the Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson. See? It's starting already. MEGAN SELING

FILASTINE, THE INFERNAL NOISE BRIGADE, DJ KARO
(Lo_Fi Performance Gallery) Filastine is a dexterous, intelligent DJ whose slashing worldbeat/drum 'n' bass sets sound like DJ/rupture after deep immersion in the Sublime Frequencies back catalog or Muslimgauze's Middle Eastern drone science filtered through ragga-jungle and gritty hiphop sensibilities. You need his and partner Maga Bo's Lost & Stolen Goods mix (recorded as Sonar Calibrado). Seattle's politically active drum corps, Infernal Noise Brigade, raise some world-class hell with their percussion fusillades, mobilizing mobs with alarming (to the authorities, anyway) efficiency and fervor. A marching band with a radical leftist agenda, INB create a sound that's pure revolutionary joy. DAVE SEGAL

THE FRAY, MATT KEARNEY, CARY BROTHERS
(Neumo's) I wonder if Cary Brothers is sick of people fixating on how much they love his song "Blue Eyes." Sure, the up-and-coming L.A. songwriter must've been stoked when Zach Braff gave him arguably the biggest break of his career by including the cut on the psychotically successful Garden State soundtrack. But come on, the dude's written other stuff, too. Still, "Blue Eyes" is probably Brothers's best song, and it'll definitely be the highlight of the set for fans that know him only as background music for Braff/Portman make-out sessions. MAYA KROTH

BLUE SCHOLARS, THE VILLAGE GREEN, MON FRERE, NATALIE QUIST
(UW HUB North Den) The UW's student-run internet radio station, Rainy Dawg Radio (www.rainydawg.org), celebrates a birthday tonight with a handpicked bill that demonstrates the great diversity you hear when you tune in to the station. Blue Scholars (one local outfit credited with reviving Seattle's hiphop scene) headline and are joined by the Village Green (classic rock with a poppy feel), Mon Frere (vampire-loving dirty, bluesy punk), and Natalie Quist (local singer-songwriter). Tickets are only $4 if you're a UW student, and $8 for the general public. MEGAN SELING

CAPS & JONES
(War Room) The Illegible DJ Caps and Pandemonium Jones rejuvenate the wonderful concept of unpredictability in DJing (peep their Moving in Stereo mix). They tailor their sets for minuscule attention spans and move freely and cleverly from the ridiculous to the sublime. If you crave seamless transitions and monochromatic range, these dudes'll kill your buzz. However, if you're open to sets crammed with brief snatches of ODB, classic-rock staples, Peter Gabriel, golden-era hiphop, Wire, JJ Fadd, crunk raps over Billy Idol's "Dancing with Myself," and whatever sounds dope and unexpected, C & J rule, emulating a fascinating, well-stocked iPod on random shuffle. DAVE SEGAL

SATURDAY 2/4

MARK E. QUARK, MARK M, CALI MIKE, SLANTOOTH
(Chop Suey) See Data Breaker, page 43.

SOUND OFF: BALLROOM INTEGRITY AND GRACE, CAPITOL BASEMENT, THE HISTRIONICS
(EMP) See All Ages Action, page 45.

AKIMBO, THE RUBY DOE, PATROL
(Comet) Akimbo's instrumentation suggests an appreciation of several decades' worth of classic and hard rock, while everything else—especially Jon Weisnewski's relentlessly screamed vocals—bare a strictly hardcore intent. Forging Steel and Laying Stone—the outfit's fourth long-player, and its first for Alternative Tentacles—places the band firmly in mainstream crossover poise, which is a rarity in their aesthetically abrasive terrain. "Breaking Rocks" sets off as a rough-edged, angular punk number, only to be knocked squarely off its trajectory by dynamic chunk chord progressions and Nat Damm's flexible drum attack. The attention and space given to meaty classic-rock riffage and Damm's ability to turbulently bolster Stone's swaggering trajectory provide just enough breathing room for those who really want to dig more conventional, sonically rigid hardcore but may not feel compelled to endure an entire album of the stuff. Similarly, Akimbo's policy toward painstakingly selected equipment and analog-recording techniques finds a sound that should satisfy even the most elite production-conscious snobbery. GRANT BRISSEY

BOB MARLEY'S WAILERS, DR. ISRAEL
(Neumo's) Best known for his 1998 jungle/dub classic Inna City Pressure (recently reissued by ROIR), this Brooklyn double threat (toaster/producer) is in town to support the recent Patterns of War (ROIR) and to open for an obscure act known as Bob Marley's Wailers (we hear they're promising up-and-comers). Doc once recorded for the defunct avant-dub label WordSound, but he's as comfortable exploring rootsy dub reggae as he is incorporating drum 'n' bass dynamics into Lee Perry/King Tubby matrices. All this plus a killer version of Willie Williams's all-time classic "Armagideon Time." Tight. DAVE SEGAL

KINSKI, NUDITY, GUESTS
(Sunset) Lott Lyzzyrd's name evokes an unholy trinity of ZZ Top, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Thin Lizzy influences, but the greasy, ramshackle Chico, California, trio actually recall a more trad-rock Butthole Surfers. Olympia's Nudity (featuring members of Tight Bros. from Way Back When, Growing, and Dub Narcotic Sound System) opt for high-speed interstellar chooglin' that scorches like Hawkwind and the Velvet Underground at their most mantric-jammiest. Nudity—who don't sound at all stripped down—should perfectly complement Kinski's own increasingly powerful forays into rock's primal, molten core. Spontaneous combustion and/or whiplash from furious headbanging is a real possibility tonight. DAVE SEGAL

THIS IS A PROCESS OF A STILL LIFE, TOURIST
(Paradox) Not only is tonight's show a CD release for Seattle's moody and slightly prog-rock influenced indie band Tourist (their record, We'll Be Under the Radar, When You're Ready, is being released on VS Recordings), but it's also a birthday party for the Paradox's indispensable soundwoman/booker/promoter/everything-in-between superstar, Alicia Blake! Tonight, be sure to take a minute to say thanks and give the girl a big birthday hug because the all-ages scene certainly wouldn't be as strong without her. MEGAN SELING

SUNDAY 2/5

THE YOUNGS
(Rendezvous) Tim and Eryn Young share a life and a band. Let's hope the domestic situation is as harmonious as the musical setup. Both sing like a less-agitated John Doe and Exene Cervenka while Tim plays mean and affectionate guitar and Eryn drums and manipulates samples. Their homespun folk-rock songs emit dulcet melodic sparkles and induce swoons in those partial to romantic balladry and beautiful guitar filigrees (check their lovely cover of Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love"). Their second album, Hand Up, Head Down, featuring Asva's John Schuller on bass, furthers the Youngs' ascension to becoming a Seattle institution. DAVE SEGAL

MONDAY 2/6

FRAMEWORK, DRED.I, SILENT LAMBS PROJECT
(Contour) See Stranger Suggests, page 20 and preview, page 33.

MATISYAHU, BLUE SCHOLARS
(Showbox) Anyone who has ever attended a reggae performance knows that hippies love the ganja-friendly genre. These earthy aficionados often sport inverted hair pyramids on their chins, which resemble drill bits when they inevitably start twirling to the rhythms. Reggae singer Matisyahu sports a gargantuan growth, but it's not just because he wants it gleaming, streaming, flaxen, and waxen: He is a Hasidic Jew. His soulful voice recalls Fishbone's Angelo Moore, even when he's singing in Yiddish. Matisyahu's concerts are exponentially more engaging than 2005's breakthrough album, Live at Stubbs, suggests, because the recording couldn't capture his considerable charisma. ANDREW MILLER

THE PHARMACY, THE SHOW IS THE RAINBOW, MAGOTDAI
(S.S. Marie Antoinette) The Pharmacy's 2005 release, B.F.F., collected dust on my desk for months. But everyone makes mistakes, and not listening to B.F.F. sooner was a huge mistake. The local outfit's debut full-length is a keyboard-infused dance party led by pissed-off boys who relish screaming it out via quirky melodies, lo-fi distortion, cowbells, and synth action more mystical than a unicorn. Some could call the dance punk littered with quick tempo changes and weird breakdowns messy, but I'm gonna call it good. MEGAN SELING

TUESDAY 2/7

SIXES, GERRITT, 2673, JASON ZEH, WITHDRAWAL METHOD
(Funhouse) Bay Area noisers Gerritt and SIXES are both fans of fog machines, but have slightly different tacks on sound and gear. Texan Gerritt (who also runs Misanthropic Agenda) is of the laptop weaponry school while Ryan Jencks (SIXES alter ego) brings a hefty analog arsenal with him, sometimes employing (gasp) a guitar when necessary. New Jersey's 2673 (AKA Kevin Winter) produces glistening feedback tones on his KittyPlay split CDR with Jessica Rylan. Tape artiste Jason Zeh hails from Ohio, and that's all Google knows of except for a squeaky, creaky mp3 that makes us shudder in the best way possible. GEORGE CHEN

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WEDNESDAY 2/8

THE HIGH VIOLETS, THE PREONS, SPANISH FOR 100, GREENWOOD
(Chop Suey) Many Seattle folks were introduced to Portland's the High Violets at the Fuzzy Ball showcase, or through the associated albums from Reverb Records, both of which featured Northwest-based modern day shoegazer bands. And the shoe certainly fits, as the High Violets feature layers of fuzzy guitars in their graceful walls of soundscape. Ethereal vocals from Kaitlyn ni Donovan evoke inevitable comparisons to Cocteau Twins, and perfectly complement the sweeping instrumentation. It will undoubtedly be gorgeous to hear how their elegant studio arrangements expand into a live stage show. DANA BOS

STARS
(Showbox) Ice hockey. Universal health care. Ending every sentence with "eh?" These are but a few of the reasons to love Canada, but lately the country's cultural exports are even more awesome. Take Stars for example: This six-piece out of Montreal (via New York) play the kind of sweet, melancholy boy-girl indie rock that should be winning Grammys. But for now they're content to keep collecting Canadian Juno nominations for albums like last year's lush, soaring (yet still rockin') Set Yourself on Fire. Let's just say it's a big improvement over Alanis and Avril, eh? MAYA KROTH