The Stranger vs. Bumbershoot

Here Come the Bad Boys

The Mind's Eye

The Surreal World

Booty Call

Intellectual Design

No Laughing Matter

Head Games

Slip of the Tongue in Cheek

The Stranger Vs. Bumbershoot

The Eternal Struggle

Comics Are Hot!

Rocket Man

Second Skin

Bookish Babes

Satan Spawn and Selma's Cootchie

FRIDAY

MUSIC

MAINSTAGE, MEMORIAL STADIUM

THE DONNAS
Once MTV's pop-metal MVPs with "Take It Off," the Donnas became one-hit wonders when 2004's Gold Medal went largely ignored. The girl gang still rawk with the best of 'em, though, spouting mad trash at the mic ("I Didn't Like You Anyway," "Fall Behind Me") and proudly wearing their KISS and Clash records on their sleeves. (6:15–7:15)

recommended NEW YORK DOLLS
As bad-boy rebels in runny makeup rock 'n' rolling by their own rules, two old Dolls plus some bar-band stringers are proving they're still pretty entertaining. These old-school New York punks were at their best when they were a hilarious joke on every other band—and now with Johnny Thunders's angry ghost snapping the fuses in their Marshall stacks, there's still comedy to be had here. (7:45–9 pm)

recommended GARBAGE
Though most famous for '90s alterna-hits like "Only Happy When It Rains" and "Queer," Garbage remain one of today's best modern-rock live acts. While the band grind out a slew of seriously catchy riff-driven hits, singer Shirley Manson stalks the stage like a woman in search of prey while belting out some of the most caustic, emotionally and sexually complicated lyrics in modern rock. (9:30–10:45)

WHAT'S NEXT STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL

recommended BEYOND REALITY
Beyond Reality is not only the best female MC in the Northwest, she's up there with the best of the West—Silent Lamb Project, Gift of Gab, Specs One, Lifesavas, and Grayskul. The CD she is currently working on with Bean One is red hot and will certainly bring her the appreciation she more than deserves. (5:15–6 pm)

recommended BLUE SCHOLARS
This has been a great year for Blue Scholars (rapper Geologic and DJ Sabzi). Their recently reissued debut CD, Blue Scholars, has been on the top of the Northwest charts, competing with established groups like Sleater-Kinney and Modest Mouse. In the upcoming months it would be nothing short of a scandal if the Blue Scholars are denied the most desired hiphop prize: national recognition. (6:30–7:15 pm)

recommended ZION I
Bay Area duo Zion I have been around since the mid-'90s, making hiphop that's consistently melodic and inclusive. Their last show in Seattle, however, lacked real inspiration; but their third and most recent CD, True & Livin', is for real. It features several collaborations with the underground's elite (Gift of Gab, Talib Kweli, Aesop Rock) and reinforces, at every opportunity, the fundamental b-boy principle: "[staying] true and livin' with a youthful vengeance." (7:45–8:45 pm)

recommended LITTLE BROTHER
The hiphop of the "Dirty South" is often thought of as misogynistic and gangster, but this trio from Durham, North Carolina (DJ/producer 9th Wonder, who's made beats for Jay-Z; and MCs Big Pooh and Phonte), are markedly different. Little Brother carries on a tradition of positive yet edgy and inquisitive rap first popularized by East Coast acts like De La Soul and A Tribe Called Quest and then given a distinctly Southern twist by Outkast. (9:15–10:15 pm)

BUMBRELLA STAGE

LAGUNA!
In a melding of the forces of pretty much every genre but rock, Seattle electro-pop band Laguna! blend jazz, reggae, house, and pop. They take the same melting-pot approach to lyrics, moving beyond the English language to incorporate a variety of influences. (1–2 pm)

MANGOSON
MangoSon play folky interpretations of traditional and contemporary Cuban son, Dominican merengue, Venezuelan fulia and Brazilian samba. Rum seems essential to experience. (2:24–4 pm)

ALTERED STATES OF FUNK
Seattle isn't known as a funk town—or a funky town. But its Nordic, slightly aloof, and chilly inhabitants like to think they can get funky. This band is your chance to grind fanny packs. (4:45–6 pm)

SKERIK'S SYNCOPATED TAINT SEPTET
This all-star ensemble, assembled by the multifarious saxophonist Skerik, blends Blue Note chitlin' jazz with stripped-down James Brown–style beats. They might throw in a spacy interlude or two, but Skerik, baritone saxophonist Craig Flory, Hammond organist Joe Doria (a master at percolating organ comps), trumpeter Dave Carter, multi-instrumentalist Hans Teuber, trombonist/keyboardist Steve Moore, and John Wicks on drums keep the focus firmly on the funk. (6:45–8 pm)

MAKTUB
Armed with songs from the recently released Say What You Mean, Reggie Watts and company rev up their groovy collision of funk, rock, pop, hiphop, and R&B for what should be one of Bumbershoot's dance-friendliest shows. (Bring panties to throw during the swoony falsetto high notes.) (8:45–10:15 pm)

BLUES STAGE, MURAL AMPHITHEATRE

BECKI SUE & HER BIG-ROCKIN' DADDIES!
They claim to be "the Northwest's premier powerhouse hip-shakin' blues band," and sassy Becki Sue and her boys are determined to get you up and dancing. High energy, low-down, deep-hued blues. Feel it! (12:30–1:30 pm)

JUDE BOWERMAN BAND
Young guitar stud Jude Bowerman is primed to make it big. Please let him light your backside on fire with original funky blues and jumpy jazz stylings while he's still here in Wheedle Town. He's backed by a solid triangle—Jon Markel on bass, Dale Fanning on drums, and Nathan Spicer on Hammond B-3, Fender Rhodes, and Hohner Clavinet. (2–3:15 pm)

THE CHRIS STEVENS BAND
The Seattle blues and jazz guitarist tears it up with fiery abandon whether covering B. B. King and T-Bone Walker or playing his own songs. His band includes the top horn-blowers 'round these parts. (3:45–5 pm)

KERMIT RUFFINS
Kermit Ruffins is a trumpet player from New Orleans and one of the original founders of the ReBirth Brass Band, which means he knows what the hell he's doing and can swing with that thing like nobody's business. (5:45–7 pm)

recommended MAVIS STAPLES
A soul legend, Mavis Staples has been making music for more than 50 years. A classic belter with an expressive and transcendent voice, she delivers beautifully some of the best-known soul and gospel songs, both solo and with the Staples Singers. Her latest album, Have a Little Faith, is a return to her gospel roots with shades of rhythm and blues. (7:45–9 pm)

BACKYARD STAGE, BROAD STREET LAWN

RUBY DEE & THE SNAKE HANDLERS
Singer Ruby Dee and guitarist Jorge Harada lead their band through old-time country, rockabilly, and just plain ol' rock 'n' roll with the accomplished ease of old pros for a seamless sound. (1–2 pm)

recommended GRAHAM TRAVIS
Singer-songwriters can be a pretty dour bunch, but Graham Travis plays on the lusher side of the fence. It's not that his tunes are featherweight, it's just that he understands the importance of melody and range. (2:45–3:45 pm)

VICCI MARTINEZ BAND
Tacoma's native daughter Vicci Martinez has appeared on Star Search where she finished second. That puts the singer (whose music has been compared to Dave Matthews) in the company of Justin Timberlake and LeAnn Rimes, neither of whom came in first when they appeared on the program. Not that we're comparing them. (4:30–5:45 pm)

CHRIS STAMEY
Chris Stamey made his indelible mark with Southern legends the dB's, the band whose jangle pop inspired R.E.M. and countless others. Since then he has produced and recorded a host of diverse bands and collaborated with Yo La Tengo for their forthcoming album. In 2004 he released his exquisitely crafted solo album, Travels from the South. (6:30–7:45 pm)

recommended M. WARD
Transistor Radio is the name of M. Ward's 2005 record and its sound. On the record you'll hear the crackle of a needle circling an old 78; the hissing static coming through the dust-covered speaker; the one-mic mono recording. You'll also hear the strong production aesthetic Matt Ward's not going to be able to recreate headlining the Broad Street lawn on Friday. Fortunately for this Portland-via–San Luis Obispo songsmith, his husky voice, fingerpicking prowess, and knack for abstruse character sketches make his music compelling outside of the studio as well. (8:30–9:45 pm)

NW COURT LOUNGE

THE GARFIELD HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ COMBO
Get your ass kicked and preconceptions about teenage musicians blown out of the water by the award-winning Garfield High School Jazz Combo, who give new meaning to the phrase "horny teens." (12:30–1:30 pm)

CUCHATA
Various Latin musics blend gracefully under the watchful ear of Cuchata's players. Guitarist/singer/songwriter Marcelo E. Quinonez fronts a band that plays a fusion of Nicaraguan, Cuban, Columbian, and Afro-Latin sounds. (2–3:15 pm)

THOMAS MARRIOTT QUARTET
Having gigged with an impressive roster of jazz luminaries including trumpet god Maynard Ferguson, Rosemary Clooney, the Tito Puente Orchestra, and the Chico O'Farrill Orchestra, this rising trumpeter can switch from a slow, creamy tone to incisive passage-work in a trice. Marriott's straight-ahead quartet plays classic bop tunes and forward-looking originals. (4–5:15 pm)

DUDLEY MANLOVE QUARTET
The Northwest's preeminent postmodern lounge lizards have been spicing up nightclubs and wedding receptions with their swinging shtick since 1995. Come hear all the standards you know and love, reinterpreted in ways that will crack your shit up, especially if you're drunk. (6–7:15 pm)

recommended STAN RIDGWAY
Former Wall of Voodoo frontman Ridgway has a voice as tangy and love-it-or-hate-it distinctive as the pylon-orange flavor powder on nacho-cheese Doritos. With a dark, quirky sense of humor and an innate knack for melody, he renders story-songs full of curious underdogs (bumbling gumshoes, gum-smacking waitresses, criminals of all stripes), long shadows, and odd, theatrical arrangements. Fans of Tom Waits, Raymond Carver, and Ida Lupino will dig him heartily. (8–9:30 pm)

EMP SKY CHURCH

THE GRUFF MUMMIES
The Gruff Mummies headed into 2005 on a wave of success by winning EMP's annual underage-band Sound Off competition. The Bainbridge Island quintet entertained the crowd and wowed the judges with a refreshingly fun and flamboyant performance, combining the drama of glam rock with a fearless punk attitude. Be prepared for a parade of top hats, faux British accents, mustaches, and a whole lot of glitter. (12:15–1:15 pm)

SUB-MOTIVE
Sub-Motive tackle a huge gauntlet of genres, incorporating everything from pop to classic rock to ska on their latest release, Days Like These. It's all pretty calm and light, but the local boys from Kent, WA, are young, so they have some life to live before they get pissed and really start goin' off. (1:45–2:45 pm)

recommended ANNA OXYGEN
Only the charming Anna Oxygen can get away with turning a rock show into an aerobics class. Using samplers, keyboards, an overhead projector, and a variety of other electronic toys to tell her stories, Anna Oxygen often turns to the crowd for help (sometimes looking for assistance with the song, sometimes wanting dancers), which makes her fun performances less of a show and more of a party that everyone's invited to. (3:15–4:15 pm)

recommended SMOOSH
Two precocious sisters from Seattle garnering international attention for their infectious, joyful, and original take on rock and pop, Smoosh look to be even brighter stars in the years to come. Asya (age 13, vocals and keys) and Chloe (11, percussion) recently released their recording debut, She Like Electric. (4:45–5:45 pm)

recommended RAZREZ
Post-punk, glam, disco, and glittery pop sensibilities collide in this dynamic local act. Whether the vocals are hiccupped or howled, Razrez can always be counted on to put on a highly stylized, entirely entertaining show. (6:15–7:15 pm)

recommended AKIMBO
Akimbo aren't fucking around as they thrash out a hardcore blend of ferociously intense rock and heavy metal. Within 30 seconds of their set you'll be sweaty, bruised, and partially deaf, but you'll most certainly be smiling too, because the boys just do it so well. (7:45–8:30 pm)

recommended THE RUBY DOE
The Ruby Doe's latest Loveless release, Always with Wings, blends the best of inventive post-hardcore song structuring with the electricity and fire of pissed-off punk rock. Their sound is turbulent, urgent, thick, and loud, and has fit perfectly on bills with bands like Division of Laura Lee, Cave-In, and the Catheters. (9–10 pm)

BUSKER STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL LAWN

EMERY CARL
Emery Carl is an honest-to-god busker. He plays at the Pike Place Market and has traveled the country plying his trade on the streets. The term "troubadour" isn't a throwaway here. (4–4:45 pm)

CHARLOTTE THISTLE
Folksinger Charlotte Thistle has a clear, serene voice with a little grit, just enough to suggest Buffy Sainte-Marie after a night with a little bourbon. (5–5:45 pm)

BALLARD AVE JUG BUSKERS
They are from Ballard. They busk. There are jugs. (6–6:45 pm)

BABY GRAMPS
Bumbershoot regular Baby Gramps is an eccentric musical genius leading a one-man American folk history parade. With his old-time croak and trusty guitar, he scribbles ragtime, blues, jazz, hillbilly folk, and whimsy pop to the delight of anyone with ears. (7–7:45 pm)

LITERATURE

STARBUCKS LITERARY STAGE

MARGARET CHULA: WOMEN HAIKU AND TANKA POETS
Chula presents a "sacred and sensual" history of Japanese poetry, beginning in the 10th century. (1–1:45 pm)

YOUTH SPEAKS
The youth spit it. Spoken word. Plus, "fresh beats." (2–3 pm)

PANEL: YOUTH AND WRITING
A panel discussion about the future of writing, spoken word, etc. Ordinarily, these conversations are predictable, but someone from 826 Seattle will be on the panel, and 826 Seattle is the best new game in town when it comes to youth and writing. (3:30–5 pm)

PRIYA KEEFE
Keefe is a poet ("I slammed my strange feathers/against the boundary between us"). (5:30–5:45 pm)

KNOCK JOURNAL PRESENTS: JOSHUA BECKMAN, KEITH EGAWA, KATHLEEN BRSAGNA
Antioch University Seattle's literary journal presents this reading by a white poet (Beckman), a Native American novelist (Egawa), and a Skagit Valley writer (Brsagna). (5:45–6:30 pm)

KATHLEEN BRYSON
A woman of all trades does a performance based on her forthcoming novel He's Lucid, about global warming and a cross-dresser named Yukon. (7–7:30 pm)

INGA MUSCIO
The author of Cunt: A Declaration of Independence has a new book—the no-less-joyful-sounding Autobiography of a Blue-Eyed Devil: My Life and Times in a Racist, Imperialist Society. (7:30–8 pm)

INK SPOT, SNOQUALMIE ROOM

STORYTIME (FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES)
Children's author Judy Schneider and illustrator Mary Weeks do their thing. (1–1:45 pm)

PAMPHLET STITCH BINDING
A class about sewing pages together. (2–2:45 pm)

WOOD ENGRAVING
Use a wood block carved by Carl Montford to print something. (3–3:45 pm)

OFFICE EXPERIMENTS #212
The Office Experiments are conducted by former members of the Typing Explosion. (4–4:45 pm)

PRINTING AND BINDING BY HAND
Paul Hunter leads a class on making handsome little books. (5–5:45 pm)

OFFICE TRANSLATIONS "A"
While-you-were-out memo poems, false personnel histories, writing like that. (6–6:45 pm)

COMEDY

See preview, page 22.
SATURDAY

MUSIC

MAINSTAGE, MEMORIAL STADIUM

JOHN BUTLER TRIO
White boy with dreadlocks. Opened for Dave Matthews. World music-meets-folk-meets-hiphop. Those descriptions will either have you grabbing for the Hacky Sack or hightailing it for the Miller High Life hills. (12:45–1:45 pm)

CITIZEN COPE
Look past his vapid, uncoordinated-frat-dude fan base and his music's insipid stoner-friendly leanings—what we've really got in Citizen Cope's Clarence Greenwood is a storyteller. "Pablo Picasso," for example, finds a panhandler crushing on a starlet in a billboard ad. A recovering addict is sketched in "Salvation," and a man driving his wife to deliver their child in "Son's Gonna Rise" ponders their relationship. That said, the music is whiter than Wonderbread and half as exciting. (2:15–3:45 pm)

TREY ANASTASIO
Get your noodle-dance on as the father of Phish brings his feel-good improvisational prog-rock to Seattle for a whopping two-and-a-half hour show—plenty of time to discover the meaning of life, or find a reason for death. (8–10:30 pm)

McCAW HALL

recommended CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO
Charlie Hunter plays an eight-string guitar, taking advantage of the 33 percent more wire at his disposal to conjure sublime bass and guitar tones. He's as comfortable with his own compositions as he is with those by James Brown, Thelonious Monk, and Bob Marley. Whether in shredding or delicately modulating mode, Hunter puts his distinctive stamp on jazz and funk. (2 pm–3:15 pm)

recommended BILL FRISELL WITH TONY SCHERR & KENNY WOLLESEN
Bill Frisell is a genre-bending guitarist who has played with everyone (Loudon Wainwright III, Elvis Costello, Ricki Lee Jones, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Bono, Marianne Faithful, and Ron Sexsmith) and in almost every style. But whether on his own projects or working for others, his sound is always distinctively his own. (3:45–5 pm)

WHAT'S NEXT STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL

THE ACADEMY IS...
The Academy Is... are a quintet of Illinois pretty boys who play watered-down pseudo-rock that Taking Back Sunday and Brand New fans will most certainly lose their shit over. With distorted guitars and lyrics about heavy hearts, they're trying to be bitter and unfuckwitable. But there just ain't nothin' hardcore about that velvet blazer, bro. (2:45–3:30 pm)

HIDDEN IN PLAIN VIEW
Drive-Thru Records band Hidden in Plain View certainly aren't trying to be inventive by recycling that tired melodic screamo formula. (4–4:45 pm)

recommended VISQUEEN
Power pop doesn't get nearly the due it deserves. We seriously doubt that fact bothers the ferocious and funny Rachel Flotard, though, who fronts Seattle's own abundantly powerful punk-pop band Visqueen. (5:30–6:30 pm)

recommended HARVEY DANGER
Seven years after their breakthrough debut, Where Have All the Merrymakers Gone?, Seattle's Harvey Danger have grown into one of the region's most trustworthy bands, honing their brainy power pop into a life's calling. With a new record due later this year, here's your chance to catch 'em blast through a fresh batch of songs and probably a couple oldies as well. (7:15 pm–8:15 pm)

recommended MINUS THE BEAR
Minus the Bear are good Method actors. When Jake Snider screams, "Let's get out a bottle and drink alone tonight" on "Absinthe Party at the Fly Honey Warehouse," he sounds as if he's really downing a flask of Jack Daniels in his hotel room. Young rockers, take note: Whether you like to mix rock 'n' roll and electronics like Minus the Bear or just thrash out like... Minus the Bear, you've got to do it like you mean it. (9–10 pm)

BUMBRELLA STAGE

BROTHERS OF THE BALADI
The Portland-based Brothers blend traditional Middle Eastern percussion, lyrics in several languages, modern melodic sensibility, and global-fusion flair to the delight of world-groove fans far and wide. Watch for belly dancers shimmying in time to the exotic rhythms. (12:45–2 pm)

recommended DEVOTCHKA
DeVotchKa hail from Boulder, Colorado, but their exotic songs defy geographical pinpointing. Using a vast instrumental arsenal that includes tuba, theremin, accordion, and vibraphone, DeVotchKa perform original songs that sound as if they've migrated through word-of-mouth transmission over hundreds of years, accumulating regional influences as they traveled. Nick Urata narrates this epic nomadic journey, and his vintage microphones capture every nuance of his richly dramatic delivery. (2:45–4 pm)

ALPHA YAYA DIALLO
Though Guinea-born guitarist Alpha Yaya Diallo seldom sings in English, his tunes are so infectiously upbeat that the language barrier proves no impediment to accessibility. Strumming an acoustic guitar and the kora, a West African harp, Diallo croons in vibrantly joyous tones. Traditional rhythms merge appealingly with the now-Vancouver-based Diallo's Western melodic sensibilities. (4:45–6:15 pm)

recommended CLINTON FEARON & THE BOOGIE BROWN BAND
Clinton Fearon, a longtime Seattle denizen, performs original roots reggae music from his native Jamaica. With danceable rhythms, a spiritual message, and positive vibrations, this group will lift your heart and get your body moving. (7–8:30 pm)

recommended DIGABLE PLANETS
Recently reunited, Digable Planets are a trio (Butterfly, Ladybug, Doodle) that formed in the early '90s and made one of hiphop's greatest records, Blowout Comb. If hiphop has an equivalent to the spirit of rock's Electric Ladyland it has to be Blowout Comb. Let's celebrate the return of the talented trio to the stage. (9:15–10:30 pm)

BLUES STAGE, MURAL AMPHITHEATRE

DARRIUS WILLRICH
A musician since the age of 12, and Summa Cum Laude graduate of Cornish (seriously), Darrius Willrich steals from all over the genre map—from jazz, hiphop, electronica, soul—to craft an intricate, harmonious sound all his own. (12:15–1:30 pm)

recommendedMAVIS STAPLES
See Friday for details. (2:15–3:30 pm)

KELLEY HUNT
Boogie-woogie piano princess Kelley Hunt knows how to handle rowdy crowds. At the Sturgis Rally in South Dakota, for example, Hunt belted the blues and plinked with passion, and bikers revved their approval. Usually, she starts with laid-back audiences, then fires them up with saucy growls and gospel clap-alongs. Her nine-minute showstopper, "Queen of the 88's," alternates between anecdotes about her teacher Mary Burke Norton and solos that do her mentor proud. (4:15–5:30 pm)

JON CLEARY AND THE ABSOLUTE MONSTER GENTLEMEN
Visiting from New Orleans, Jon Cleary mixes melodic grooves with biting lyrics, giving his music a funk/Dixie-meets-Cuba sound. He was featured in an episode of Martin Scorsese's exhaustive PBS documentary The Blues and has in the past worked with such notables as Taj Mahal, B. B. King, and Bonnie Raitt. (6:15–7:30 pm)

THE DUKE ROBILLARD BAND
A guitarist for the Fabulous Thunderbirds ("Tough Enough"), Duke Robillard brings his considerable jazz and rockabilly skills to town solo style. He has three decades of performing under his belt, and has been honored with the W. C. Handy Guitarist of the Year award twice. That means he's got chops. (8:15–9:45 pm)

BACKYARD STAGE, BROAD STREET LAWN

recommended LUKE TEMPLE
With a delicately vulnerable delivery, yet a surprisingly strong voice, Luke Temple sings songs of melancholic redemption and contemplation, sounding like part Tim Buckley and (occasionally on those stratosphere-reaching high notes) part Jeff Buckley. (12–1 pm)

recommended CAROLYN MARK
Victoria, BC, native Carolyn Mark is the self-appointed Lucille Ball of country, but, like that red-haired comedienne, everything this spirited performer does is informed by pathos and unquestionable emotional sincerity. She gets laughs because she knows that Comedy = Tragedy + Timing. Her catchy melodies and plucky onstage high jinks help, too. And crowning her smile-inducing originals is a voice as natural and authentic as Tammy Wynette or Skeeter Davis. (1:30–2:30 pm)

IAN McFERON BAND
Singer/songwriter Ian McFeron and his band are pub and bar favorites—much like fish and chips. They play a blend of acoustic folk-rock with a side of alt-country, which. like pub food, may not be ground-breaking but is damn good anyway. (3:15–4:30 pm)

SARAH LEE GUTHRIE AND JOHNNY IRION
Folk-rockers Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion have a lot to live up to with Guthrie's lineage—she's the granddaughter of Woody/daughter of Arlo. They more than rise to the challenge, bringing to mind less of her family tree and more of the harmonies of Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris. (5:15–6:30 pm)

recommended BILLY JOE SHAVER
Billy Joe Shaver first made his name as a songwriter for musicians such as Kris Kristofferson and Waylon Jennings (penning most of the classic Honky Tonk Heroes). But it's his own versions of his rough-and-tumble country songs of drinking, fighting, and forgiveness that have cemented his place in the pantheon of country greats. (7:15–8:30 pm)

recommended TIFT MERRITT
Tift Merritt burst onto the scene with her debut album, Bramble Rose, a gentle showcase for her gorgeous voice. On its Grammy-nominated follow-up, Tambourine, she revealed a stronger, subtler sense of herself and her songs, tapping a mixture of white soul and '70s songwriters like Carole King for powerfully understated results. (9:15–10:30 pm)

NW COURT LOUNGE

THE FADING COLLECTION
Seattle quartet the Fading Collection have won the support of KEXP DJs Michele Myers and John Richards, MTV's The Real World, and praise from Three Imaginary Girls—and the band's press materials are undoubtedly printed on the finest paper stock ever used by local musicians. The Fading Collection's third and most recent album, Supertron, presents a brash, competent electronic-rock mosaic, borne aloft by Sarah McCulloch's vibrant vocals. Programmer Matt Frickelton's got hooks like Seattle winters have precipitation. (12:30–1:30 pm)

SAMITE
A native of Uganda, Samite grew up playing the traditional flute. In 1982, he fled his homeland for Kenya, landing gigs with the Bacchus Club Jazz Band and the African Heritage Band. Five years later, he moved to America, recording six beautiful albums of Ugandan music, the most recent of which, Tunula Eno, was made during his wife's final year of battling brain cancer. (2:15–3:45 pm)

ANDRE FERIANTE
Blessed with 1920s matinee-idol looks (including a pouting gaze and goatee worthy of Hollywood's classic pirate movies), this singer/guitarist plays unabashedly romantic music influenced by flamenco and classical guitar technique. The sonic equivalent of "historical romance" novels, Feriante frames lyrics of love, longing, and rarefied lust with swooning strums and florid picking. (4:30–5:45 pm)

THE TIPTONS SAX QUARTET
Propelled by the frontline of Amy Denio and Jessica Lurie, this saxophone quartet swings and sways through lithe, Balkan-influenced arrangements punctuated by the occasional "Hey!" Underneath it all, percussionist Elizabeth Pupo-Walker keeps it cooking with well-placed cymbal fills as baritone saxophonist Tobi Stone growls out funky bass lines. (6:30–7:45 pm)

recommended MARLENA SHAW
Since her Apollo Theater debut at age 10, vocalist Marlena Shaw has been wowing audiences with her versatility. She has defied categorization for four decades, mixing soul, blues, jazz, and even glitzy disco on her groundbreaking LPs and nightclub programs. Shaw, who spent 1968 to 1972 honing her chops with the Count Basie Band, makes jazz her primary bag nowadays, but whatever her choice of material, she can turn from demur to demonic on a dime. (8:30–9:45 pm)

EMP SKY CHURCH

recommended INFOMATIK
Local trio Infomatik play a mix of punk, pop, and analog synth music that recalls the heyday of Joy Division and New Order. But the band isn't another humorless retro act. Bassist Ben Larson, drummer Colin English, and keyboardist Geoff Gardner take their sound to new places with a definite sense of dry wit informing the lyrics. (12:15–1:15 pm)

recommended MERCIR
Mercir's sleek and haunting electronic indie experiments are heavily influenced by electro-friendly rock acts like Radiohead, Sigur Rós, and Air. Using a plethora of tools—synthesizers, acoustic guitars, and turntables—the local trio's dark music moves slowly, with a flawless fluidity and an undeniably sexy vibe. (1:45–2:45 pm)

recommended VIVA VOCE
Kevin and Anita Robinson, a husband-and-wife duo from Portland, make intricate music with instruments that include kazoos, saws, and the subdued harmony of their own pretty voices. Even the WB has succumbed to the allure of these modern rockers, recently featuring their music on the show One Tree Hill. (3:15–4:15 pm)

recommended IQU
Watching IQU's K. O. play the theremin (the electronic instrument where you control the volume and pitch by how close your hands get to two antennae) is a show in itself. It's hypnotizing seeing him gently wave his hands around in the air to create music, and it's only one of the many layers of the band's danceable, sexy synth-heavy electro pop. (4:45–5:45 pm)

EVA
Prestigious local DJ/producer/Element resident Eva has spun with top-tier names in the dance-music biz: Everyone from Paul Oakenfold and Felix da Housecat to John Digweed. Although she's known around town for her house and drum 'n' bass nights, Eva spins a span of Italo disco, techno, and British club music. (6:45–9 pm)

JUNKIE XL
Best known as Elvis's posthumous "Conversation" starter, Junkie XL has also worked with Chuck D, Robert Smith, Peter Tosh, and Gary Numan, concocting uncannily complementary beats for each of his collaborators. None of his famous friends will cameo at this concert, but the Amsterdam-born big-beat specialist has enough riveting material to make their absence irrelevant. He debuted in 1997 on the metal-heavy label Roadrunner, and his live shows still thrive on electro-rock hybrid energy. (9–11 pm)

BUSKER STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL LAWN

FLOWER ALLEY
Not the Kentucky Derby racehorse but the band. (12–12:45 pm)

AMBER TIDE
Amber Tide is the acoustic duo of Thaddeus and Sandahbeth Spae. They play guitar, harmonica, tamborine, didgeridoo, bass trombone, banjo, ukulele, hi-hat, bowed psaltery, and PVC pipe. Damn, that's a lot of instruments. That's beyond eclectic. That's scary. (1–1:45 pm)

SHOEHORN
Michael "Shoehorn" Conley tap-dances and plays the horn. His sets are improvised, mixing standards, blues, and rock. This sounds like something that you might see on Venice Beach. (2–2:45 pm)

JIM HINDE
Jim Hinde is an old-school acoustic guitar-slinging busker. That means Dylan, union songs, and a strain of patter to make Utah Phillips proud. (3–3:45 pm)

CHARLOTTE THISTLE
See Friday for details. (4–4:45 pm)

ROBERT BLAKE
Bellingham's Robert Blake make no apologies for being a classic folk singer, one who melds the personal and the political in his repertoire, and hoes his own road (he's been touring cross-country, playing punk and roots venues, since 1997) with a keen DIY sensibility. Accompanying himself on guitar and harmonica, Blake has been likened to Dylan, but his red-blooded delivery, which heightens every sentiment he articulates—sorrow, exuberance, bewilderment—smacks more of Irish storytelling traditions. (5–5:45 pm)

EMERY CARL
See Friday for details. (6–6:45 pm)

BALLARD AVE JUG BUSKERS
See Friday for details. (7–7:45 pm)

LITERATURE

Starbucks Literary Stage

Kevin Sampsell and Haiku Inferno
More haiku. Now with karate and audience participation. Sampsell is an editor and writer from Portland. (1–1:45 pm)

Juliette Torrez's Kapow!
Torrez edits a series of writing and comics called Kapow! Some of her Kapow! contributors (Noel Franklin, Jon Longhi, Cas McGee, Bucky Sinister, James Tracy, and Gregory Zura) will speak and make action-hero noises. (2–3 pm)

The End of the Wor(l)d
A panel discussion between a wide range of people from a variety of magazines, from the great (the Believer) to the well-meaning, lackluster, and local (Rivet). Panelists are Andrew Leland, Jennifer Joseph, Kevin Sampsell, Amber Curtis, and Leah Baltus. Moderator is Laine Bergeson of Utne. (3:30–5 pm)

recommended Shelley Jackson
See preview, page 27. (5:30–6 pm)

Larry Lee Palmer
Palmer is "a bard of the backstretch, a poet of the pari-mutuels," according to David McCumber of the Seattle P-I. He writes about land and horses. (6–6:30 pm)

INK SPOT, SNOQUALMIE ROOM

THE EDITORIAL WE
A discussion about typos and how they're everywhere! Like on menus! And in published books! (12:45–1:45 pm)

OFFICE EXPERIMENTS #4
The second day of interactive writing projects with office props, led by former members of Typing Explosion. (2–2:45 pm)

GUERRILLA POSTER MAKING (BEAUTIFUL ANGLE)
Lance Kagey and Tom Llewellyn believe in hanging posters "responsibly." Not very guerrilla of them. (3–3:45 pm)

OFFICE TRANSLATIONS "Q"
Impromptu poetry and miscellany. (4–4:45 pm)

HAIKU WORKSHOP
Michael Dylan Welch teaches a class all about how to write the easiest poems in the world. (5–5:45 pm)

JAPANESE STAB BINDING
A class taught by Seattle Center for Book Arts. (6–6:45 pm)

THEATER/DANCE

McCAW HALL

recommended SMART: DAVE EGGERS, SARAH VOWELL, DANIEL HANDLER, MIKE DOUGHTY, AND THE TRANSATLANTIC ORCHESTRA (IN A BENEFIT FOR 826 SEATTLE)
See preview, page 25. (8–10 pm)

Bagley Wright Theatre

FOUR ELEMENTS
Beloved local choreographer Wade Madsen showcases two segments of his new Four Elements, an ambitious exploration of natural forces brought to life by 17 of Seattle's most accomplished dancers. (1–1:45 pm)

recommended LEMONY SNICKET
The dark-minded Mr. Snicket recounts the dismal luck of the Baudelaire orphans. His serialized book A Series of Unfortunate Events has scared and intimidated even more children since being adapted into a major motion picture. The mystery man will accompany himself on accordion. (2:30–3:30 pm)

WORD BECOMES FLESH
Written and performed by celebrated slam poet Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Word Becomes Flesh is a full-length choreo-poem—part dance, part theater, part hiphop—charting the world of new fatherhood through a series of letters to an unborn son. (4:30–6 pm)

STREB
Dance for people who don't like dance: STREB incorporates such varied disciplines as extreme sports and Hollywood stunt work, and is led by MacArthur "Genius" grant-winning choreographer Elizabeth Streb. (8–9 pm)

Theatre Puget Sound Stage

PURDY WOMAN
A one-woman, eight-character show by a veteran NYC-based performer and comic Mary Purdy, Purdy Woman illustrates the challenges facing such characters as Lucy, a fast-talking woman in a bar. One such decision is whether or not schnauzers are cute. (2:15–3 pm)

SEATTLE GOGA
Seattle's premiere all-female improv troupe offers up its hot Girl-on-Girl Action—a sparkling hour of unadulterated long-form improv. No script, no audience suggestions, just pure estrogen-fueled mayhem. (5–6 pm)

SIDNEY SNOOP—ACE DETECTIVE
This all-ages attraction by the Seattle Mime Theater boasts mystery, adventure, romance, and dastardly villains, all evoked in utter silence. That's the power—and the terror—of mime. (3:30–4:30 pm)

recommended WRECKAGE
Superstar solo performer Lauren Weedman returns to Seattle with Wreckage, her pitch-black comedy about a horrible lie spun out of control. (6:30–8 pm)

COMEDY

See preview, page 22.
SUNDAY

MUSIC

MAINSTAGE, MEMORIAL STADIUM

recommended THE PHARCYDE
Not sure if the rapper Fat Lip is back with the Pharcyde (he left the group many years ago). If he has returned, then great; if not, who knows what to expect from this set. Born and based in L.A., the Pharcyde have provided hiphop with one masterpiece, Bizarre Ride II the Pharcyde, and one of the greatest music videos ever, "Drop," which was directed by Spike Jonze. (12:15–1:15 pm)

recommended TALIB KWELI
While Mos Def is pursuing a career in Hollywood, his Black Star partner, Talib Kweli, is still making hiphop. Last year he toured successfully with the Beastie Boys, and his politically charged raps can be found on almost all of the important underground CDs that have come out in the first part of this dizzying decade. Kweli is a poor righteous teacher. (1:45–2:45 pm)

recommended COMMON
Though known for his heavy and conscious raps, Common is actually a great showman. He works hard to please and entertain his audience (unlike 50 Cent, who just stands around trying to look cool). When Common gets onstage, it's Show Time! The performance he gave five years ago at the Paramount was absolutely (and unexpectedly) mind-blowing. Don't bother with his last record, a commercial hit simply titled Be, just go to the show and see hiphop at its best. (3:15–4:15 pm)

MARC BROUSSARD
Marc Broussard is a soul singer who is said to possess "a sound that lands somewhere between Stevie Wonder and Dave Matthews." Since Dave Matthews has no soul, we have no idea what that means. But his mellifluous baritone is lovely. (8:15–9:15 pm)

recommended ELVIS COSTELLO
Elvis Costello wears those trademark Clark Kent–with-severe-astigmatism frames, except Costello has no struggle between superhero and mild-mannered alter ego. Since debuting in 1977 as the consummate new-wave literate cynic, Costello has shifted his emphasis while in the public eye—his compositions range from sardonic, reggae-fueled bob to string quartets—while staying true to a singular identity that appreciated Tin Pan Alley pop and pub rock as much as prickly punk. (9:45–11 pm)

McCAW HALL

recommended BO DIDDLEY
This consummate innovator and live performer is a chief figure in the architecture of modern music. Without the guitar blueprints of Bo Diddley, rock 'n' roll as we know it may have never come to be. Idolized by both the Beatles and the Rolling Stones (who even covered Diddley's songs), he is truly one of rock's godfathers. (3–4:15 pm)

recommended JESSE SYKES & THE SWEET HEREAFTER
Jesse Sykes and Phil Wandscher, the original guitarist for Whiskeytown, create folk-noir that casts a spell of transcendent sadness and lovesickness. On Restless Burning and Oh, My Girl Sykes delivers elegant and emotionally rich songs in a voice that mixes Chan Marshall and Emmylou Harris for a ghostly grit that defies easy categorization. (7:30–8:15 pm)

recommended SON VOLT
Jay Farrar blazes a path wherever he goes. Whether as founder of alt-country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, fronting Son Volt or on solo excursions, he has a voice built for melancholic ambivalence and longing. On Son Volt's latest, Okemah & the Melody of Riot, their first new music in seven years, he brings some of the prickliness of solo work to the beautiful country-rock the band has perfected. (8:45–10:15 pm)

WHAT'S NEXT STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL

recommended SCHOOLYARD HEROES
It was only a matter of time before the rest of the world caught on to Schoolyard Heroes' magic. After releasing an impressive second record (Fantastic Wounds) and completing a summer tour with Vendetta Red, the band has exploded on the national press circuit, including a moment as Spin.com's band of the day. We knew their electrifying combination of hardcore, metal, and heavy rock fronted by a wailing and magnetic frontwoman would turn 'em into stars eventually. (4–4:45 pm)

recommended THE LOCUST
Shrieking, thrashing and jagged, SoCal's quartet the Locust leave blisters on ear canals as if sharing an antisocial disease—appropriate considering how many might compare the performance to being dry-socket skull-fucked. The Locust blurt metallic, malevolent splatters of feverish, grinding hardcore topped with intergalactic epilepsy. The assault subsides only long enough for the paranoia to creep in on bristly, candy-striped legs. (5:30–6:15 pm)

recommended PRETTY GIRLS MAKE GRAVES
Seattle's post-emo/hardcore "supergroup" Pretty Girls Make Graves came tearing from the garage with their 2002 EP Good Health, to be followed expediently by 2003's full-length The New Romance. To date the song "Speakers Push the Air" is still totally crush-worthy—all heaving, gnarled, rapturous public intoxication. And nothing that has followed has toned down the band's propulsive serpentine relentlessness, only continued the musical squeals and zeal. (7–8 pm)

PEPPER
Kona, Hawaii, band Pepper play reggae-influenced bro-rock. The band sometimes perform without their shirts (ew), and they often ask the ladies of the crowd to come up and dance with them while they sing crappy songs about partying, prostitutes, and punk-rock cowboys. Wear a white baseball hat and polo shirt with the collar up and you'll blend in just fine. (8:45–10 pm)

BUMBRELLA STAGE

IGUALES
Easy-listening material led by musicians who let the instruments do the talking, Iguales survive in that murky ground between smooth jazz and jam band. African and Latin percussion work adds to their vision of "world funk fusion." (12:45–2 pm)

OMAR TORREZ BAND
First noticed at the 1995 National Jimi Hendrix Gibson Guitar Competition, Omar Torrez is now considered something of a master, drawing comparisons to Stevie Wonder and Prince for his innovations in music and composition. He's also drawn international attention, touring Russia last summer and performing with acts like the Buena Vista Social Club and Pancho Sanchez. (2:45–4 pm)

recommended JOE BATAAN
Rising out of Spanish Harlem, Joe Bataan (AKA Peter Nitollano) became the quintessential Latin Funk Brother, as the title of a recent compilation of his peak years (1967–72) with the legendary Fania label dubs him. For nearly four decades, Bataan has been busting out hearty soul shouts over sinuous, joyous Latin R&B and festive funk joints. Surprisingly, Bataan's first album in 20 years (with songwriter Daniel Collas), Call My Name, may be his best yet. (4:45–6:15 pm)

MIDIVAL PUNDITZ
Despite their wacky misspellings, MIDIval PunditZ are actually heavily spiritual chaps who vibrate at the highest level of the Asian massive. Gaurav Raina and Tapan Raj hail from New Delhi, India, and thread traditional instruments like the santur and tabla through matrices of jungle and trance rhythms, pepper the mixes with heartfelt devotional chants, and bliss out with Om-powered ohms. Behold the new (t)urban music. Bhangra gong, get it on! (7–8:15 pm)

ISRAEL VIBRATION
Are our eyes deceiving us? Israel Vibration (Cecil Spence and Lascelle Bulgin) appears to be one of only two reggae acts in this year's lineup. Impossible! Why? Even if you hate Jamaica's most recognized cultural product, you can't deny the fact that veteran reggae bands like Israel Vibration draw huge crowds at this festival. Programmers, if you are going to deny us some roots, then get us some gunclapping dancehall. (9–10:30 pm)

BLUES STAGE, MURAL AMPHITHEATRE

BLUES ORBITERS
This Seattle quintet kicks out electric blues jams. Also, they look pretty hot in their space suits. (12–1 pm)

recommended WHEEDLE'S GROOVE
Do not miss this show. Seattle's funk and soul stars of the '60s and '70s reunited thanks to the hard work of eclectic local label Light in the Attic, who issued the awesome Wheedle's Groove comp last year. The crew sold out a club show earlier this year, where all reports confirmed these ladies and gentlemen of the good foot still got it. (1:45–3:30 pm)

THE GOSPEL HUMMINGBIRDS
Get ready for plenty of hand clapping, soul shouting, and call-and-response sing-along action in the name of the man upstairs. Since their formation in the 1960s, Grammy-nominated Oakland, California, choral septet the Gospel Hummingbirds have been spreading the good word via vintage-style tight vocal harmonies and spirited stage practice that recalls the genre's '50s heyday, while taking their music and message to the masses via venues as diverse as Japanese jazz festivals and San Francisco nightclubs. (4:15–5:30 pm)

MOFRO
Mofro's swampy Southern funk moves at the sleepy pace of a rural jam session starring a bottle of moonshine, sun-glossed memories, and that essential harmonica melody drifting off into the sunset. (6:15–7:30 pm)

recommended BILLY PRESTON
Organist/vocalist Preston's played with Mahalia Jackson, Little Richard, and the Beatles. Impressive, but he'll always rule for his 1972 hit "Outa-Space." The song won a Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental, but don't hold that against it. Quite simply, "Outa-Space" is one of the most uplifting, adrenalizing funk tracks ever waxed. Preston ought to devote his entire set to "Outa-Space." But then Bumbershoot would have to quell a mass orgy, and that could get messy. (8:15–9:45 pm)

BACKYARD STAGE, BROAD STREET LAWN

recommended DAVID POE
If Suzanne Vega were still a big mainstream draw—think 1987, circa her hit "Luka"—one might rightly say that this New York singer-songwriter should be hailed as Vega's male aesthetic heir. Alas, Vega no longer tops the charts, but Poe really should. His original compositions share an eye for telling details, revealing him as an inveterate people watcher, and he sings with a detached quality that makes the scenarios he spins all the more captivating. (12–1 pm)

recommended TIM SEELY
Former singer of the Actual Tigers, Tim Seely recently went solo, and his debut full-length, Funeral Music, has been selling well in local record stores. He's certain to be a favorite among those who appreciate artists like Elliott Smith and Wilco. (1:30–2:30 pm)

recommended MARY GAUTHIER
Former alcoholic and teenage runaway, lesbian Southern singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier has a storied life to draw upon. But her gripping originals, which rival the best of Lucinda Williams, or Springsteen at his most subdued, eschew histrionics. Instead, Gauthier (pronounced "go-shay") spins Spartan yarns populated with scrappy characters and stark settings, throwing the emotional content of her songs into sharp relief, with the points and edges further enhanced by her unaffected singing. (3:15–4:15 pm)

recommended THE DUHKS
They're a bluegrass quintet, sure, but they're so much more. Like other crossover acts Nickel Creek and Crooked Still, Winnipeg folkies the Duhks balance their reverence for Appalachian tradition with feisty pop/rock hooks and presence. Singer Jessica Havey has a fervent alto that could turn a sulky coffeehouse into a gospel revival, while the rest of the quintet incorporates salsa, French-Canadian folk, and Mummers marches into the mix. It's a bit chaotic, but in the end it's not too far from Ralph Stanley... if he had tattoos and Marshall stacks. (5–6:15 pm)

recommended THE POSIES
Since debuting in 1988, Seattle-based Big Star fetishists/collaborators the Posies have been on-again/off-again more times than Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee. But thankfully for those who love bright, British Invasion–inspired mellifluous jangle pop, the duo of Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow are back again to offer an overview of how their career has boomed and bloomed. Plus they have a new album of tastefully paced, melodic arrangements to share. (7–8:15 pm)

HOTHOUSE FLOWERS
Hothouse Flowers were a somewhat big deal in the late-'80s and early-'90s. It was a time when Irish rock seemed to roam the earth, calling down God's fury, celebrating inebriation, and, of course, luxuriating in the misery of "the troubles." For that alone we never wore green for 10 years. They were compared to U2 because, well, they are Irish. They are back with their first Stateside album in 10 years. Paint a shamrock on your face and jig away. (9–10:30 pm)

NW COURT LOUNGE

THE BASTARDS OF JAZZ
Self-described as "Dixieland Meets Tower of Power," the Bastards earn their name with their patented bastardizations of jazz, ska, funk, and soul, allegedly guaranteed to make you shake your crusty rump. (12:15–1:30 pm)

MARLENA SHAW
See Saturday for details. (2:15–3:30 pm)

SWAMPDWELLER
The 10 members of Seattle's Swampdweller want to funk you up—but not in predictable ways, thankfully. Featuring local stalwarts Reggie Watts (vocals), Andy Sells (turntables), Marc Fendel (alto sax), and Joe Doria (Hammond organ), Swampdweller flaunt snazzy jazz chops as well as an affinity for hiphop scratching and galvanizing, exotic rhythms. You can imagine seasoned crate diggers, soul-jazz fans, and dreadlocked jam-band aficionados all lifting lighters to Swampdweller's serpentine groove science. (4:15–5:30 pm)

JOVINO SANTOS NETO QUINTETO
Neto, a Brazilian pianist and flutist who has collaborated with Airto Moreira, Sergio Mendes, and the legendary Hermeto Pascoal, leads this sunny, uptempo jazz quintet stocked with local favorites. Mark Ivester (drums), the ubiquitous Chuck Deardorf (bass), percussionist Jeff Bush, the versatile instrumentalist Hans Teuber (saxophones and flutes), and Neto make festive music leavened with rhythms (samba, tango, etc.) and instruments (side-drums, shakers, woodblock, flutes, tambourine) not usually associated with jazz. (6:15–7:30 pm)

recommended JUANA MOLINA
Argentine folk singer swathed in flits of electrocoustic production, Juana Molina imparts the feeling that stream of consciousness is a babbling brook. More often than not Molina establishes an acoustic guitar motif then gingerly peppers the austere mix with cascades of aqueous keyboard washes and earthy percussion. Most compelling, however, is her breathy detachment—another contrast for a seemingly effortless artiste easily summarized by the word "flow." (8:15–9:15 pm)

EMP SKY CHURCH

DOLOREAN
Oregon's Dolorean started as just a solo project often found playing local coffee shops, but it didn't take long for Al James to enlist the help of friends and expand the project into a full band. They've since released the critically acclaimed Violence in the Snowy Field, and shared the stage with acts like Crooked Fingers and the Doves. (12:30–1:30 pm)

recommended MATH AND PHYSICS CLUB
Belle and Sebastian fans, ready your cardigans. Math and Physics Club provide the type of sweetly twee indie rock that covers every crush as everlasting love and every kiss as a historical event. (2–2:45 pm)

HEADPHONES
Pedro the Lion fans will be happy to note that they can now experience frontman David Bazan in multiple musical contexts. Headphones is Bazan's newest outlet for brooding romantic melancholy, using simple electronic accents and drum machines to tackle the somber side of the human condition. (3:15–4:15 pm)

DAMIEN JURADO
Sad songs have many proponents but none more dedicated or diverse than Damien Jurado. With each album he strips away or textures his detailed portraits of sweetly misguided and real-gone misfits, giving the songs sonic and emotional dimensions beyond typical singer-songwriter fare. (4:45–5:45 pm)

HIVE
Hive's riff-studded jungle track "Ultrasonic Sound" merged perfectly with futuristic action on the double-platinum Matrix soundtrack. One of the more versatile DJs working, this California resident constructs kaleidoscopic mix CDs that range from hiphop breaks to chill-out ambience to aggressive drum 'n' bass. Hive's dreadlocks writhe like Medusa's serpents during his animated sets. (9–11 pm)

BUSKER STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL LAWN

BALLARD AVE JUG BUSKERS
See Friday for details. (12–12:45 pm)

EMERY CARL
See Friday for details. (1–1:45 pm)

ROBERT BLAKE
See Saturday for details. (2–2:45 pm)

AMBER TIDE
See Saturday for details. (3–3:45 pm)

FLOWER ALLEY
See Saturday for details. (4–4:45 pm)

BABY GRAMPS
See Friday for details. (5–5:45 pm)

SHOEHORN
See Saturday for details. (6–6:45 pm)

JIM HINDE
See Saturday for details. (7–7:45 pm)

LITERATURE

LITERARY STAGE

HAIKU FRESH CURRENTS
The third day in a row of haiku at Bumbershoot. Seems antithetical to the purpose of haiku. (1–1:45 pm)

recommended VIS-À-VIS SOCIETY
Sierra Nelson and Rachel Kessler, formerly of the Typing Explosion, present and analyze data collected during the festival. Pie charts are promised. (2–3 pm)

PANEL: WORD BECOMES FLESH
Sounds disgusting. Satan is clearly involved. So is Shelley Jackson (she who tattoos literature onto people), Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Peter Pereira, M.D., Dennis Evans, and Emily Warn. (3:30–5 pm)

PEGGY SHUMAKER
The poet is from Alaska. Her sixth collection is Blaze. (5:30–6 pm)

J. W. MARSHALL
Taken With is the poet's newest book, handsomely published by Wood Works Press. (6–6:30 pm)

recommended D. TRAVERS SCOTT
The author reads his sick and twisted "backwoods noir." Gay sex, incest, murder, etc. (7–7:30 pm)

QUASIMODO & THE BELLRINGERS
Perhaps we're being mean, but here's the description of this event from the good folks at Bumbershoot: "Sandy Diamond and her three-piece jazz/blues ensemble return to Bumbershoot to showcase a new CD of poems and songs about, among other things, madness, physical deformity, the search and rescue efforts at Ground Zero in New York City, and redemption." God save us. (7:30–8:30 pm)

INK SPOT, SNOQUALMIE ROOM

IN 25 WORDS OR MORE
A workshop on making up stories based on random photographs. Also for kids. (1–1:45 pm)

STAR BINDING
How to bind paper together so that it looks like a star. (2–2:45 pm)

ROLL THE PRESSES! (SCHOOL OF VISUAL CONCEPTS)
The School of Visual Concepts shows off some antique letterpresses. (3–3:45 pm)

OFFICE EXPERIMENTS #17
Poetry, typewriters, ladies in office outfits, etc. (4–4:45 pm)

APPROPRIATE PRINT TECHNOLOGIES
An event billed as "45 minutes of fascinating discussion of all word media from calligraphy to e-mail." (5–5:45 pm)

EXQUISITE CORPSE EXPLORATION & AUTOPSY
Everyone who shows up will collaborate in a collective text. (6–6:45 pm)

THEATER/DANCE

BAGLEY WRIGHT THEATRE

STREB
See Saturday for details. (1:30–3 pm)

recommended JOHN WESLEY HARDING AND FRIENDS
With his plummy British accent, graying temples, literary smarts, and Cambridge credentials, John Wesley Harding seemed destined to become an author. But first he went into showbiz, crafting 10-plus albums showcasing his sly, sensitive wit and vast knowledge of genres from vintage English pastorals to power pop. Having won praise for his recent Victorian novel, Misfortune, Harding assembled contemporary roots supergroup the Loveall Tryst (featuring Kelly Hogan) to render the book's songs in sublime folk-rock settings. (4:15–5:30 pm)

WADE MADSEN
See Saturday for details. (6:15–7 pm)

MARC BAMUTHI JOSEPH
See Saturday for details. (8–9:30 pm)

TheatRE Puget Sound Stage

recommended WRECKAGE
See Saturday for details. (3–4:30 pm)

ARE WE SCARED?: AN EXPERIMENT IN CHILD'S PLAY
Written in collaboration with preschoolers and their bizarre little imaginations, Open Circle Theatre's Are We Scared? features such characters as a dinosaur in need of diapers. (5–6:15 pm)

SPLIT SECOND
Investigating the world of snap decisions, Split Second is the full-length solo work by acclaimed movement artist/mime Mik Kuhlman, who draws on history, film, photography, and personal experience (as well as writings by Raymond Carver and David James Duncan) to craft a series of vignettes illuminating those moments in time that change everything. (6:45–8 pm)

COMEDY

See preview, page 22.
MONDAY

MUSIC

MAINSTAGE, MEMORIAL STADIUM

recommended THE DECEMBERISTS
"I am a writer, a writer of fictions." For the amount that the Decemberist's Colin Meloy courts the literati, you'd think he'd steer away from lines this literal. Then again, the Portland troupe's latest offering, Picaresque, is their most straightforward, so maybe this is the songwriter following suit. Toning down the band's conceptual maritime motif (the album thankfully boasts only one sea chantey), Meloy's characters this time are more universal—the lonely county lineman, the awkward athlete, and the societal tapestry surrounding a group of military wives. (12:30–1:45 pm)

DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL
Don't know the songs of Chris Carrabba, the creator of Dashboard Confessional? Don't worry, for DC's got the most ardent fans on the planet, they sing every word with aplomb. What might have begun as isolationist, emotional elegies (characterizing an entire genre that's tagged "emo") turned out to be the soundtrack to so many romantic souls. (2:15–3:30 pm)

recommended MUDHONEY
In one of Bumbershoot's more perfect pairings, Seattle punk legends Mudhoney open for one of their biggest influences, the Stooges. The local act is always a vibrant, visceral experience live, and they may even play some new material from their upcoming Sub Pop release tonight. (8–9 pm)

recommended IGGY AND THE STOOGES
From the cave to the trailer park to the Rhino Records reissue: The Stooges were America's greatest shit-rock band, a bunch of lizard brains in leather jackets who wrote half their best album (the first one; fuck the rest of their heavy metal jive) in the hotel room the night before they recorded it. Detroit really did have the sound of young America for a while during the '60s: girls with hair like Cadillac fins and the mushmouths who stared at them from across the street. God, to be born Jimmy Osterberg and die Iggy Pop. (9:30–11 pm)

MCCAW HALL

recommended MEREDITH MONK W/THEO BLECKMANN AND KATIE GEISSINGER
Meredith Monk wants to screech, neigh, caw, and hiss at you. No, no; it's part of the song. The avant-garde singer/composer brings 40 years of performing to Seattle, in an evening of movement and music—assuredly with her characteristic "extended vocal technique." If you're put off by the word "experimental," still try Monk. Her compositions are folkloric, other-worldly, and deeply moving. When she's "on," Monk is like the best old town witch—telling tales, cackling over her curative musical brew, and scaring the bejeezus out of you. (4–5:30 pm)

WHAT'S NEXT STAGE, EXHIBITION HALL

recommended AQUEDUCT
Seattle transplants Aqueduct may sing about the typical fame, love, and breakups, but there's a droll sense of humor coursing through their songs separating them from the rest of the pack. Fronted by David Terry, the group melds ebullient indie rock with synth beats and a playful sense of melody. (2:45–3:45 pm)

recommended EARLIMART
One of the best indie rock acts playing Bumbershoot this year, L.A.'s Earlimart are a gorgeous blend of sky-high harmonies, tender eulogies (to the late, great Elliott Smith) and atmospheric moments that touch on Granddaddy's grandeur. (4:30–5:30 pm)

recommended TED LEO + PHARMACISTS
All the guts got scooped out of mod-punk-power-pop by Elvis Costello and his angry young friends, leaving Ted Leo just the rinds—but he makes even that enough, writing around the best-used anthems of 1979 with his own super-bright choruses and super-smart lyrics. Back at his alma mater Notre Dame, all the little freshman have the Pharmacists on the wall instead of Rage Against the Machine, hoping they'll grow up just like Professor Ted. (6:15–7:15 pm)

FLOGGING MOLLY
Anchored by Irish expatriate Dave King, this Southern California–based band is a somewhat motley crew of heavy-metal devotees, skaters, and traditional instrumentalists. Fans of Irish rockers the Pogues—or any one up for a good, rousing party—will appreciate Flogging Molly's unique blend of traditional Celtic arrangements and bruised-up punk. Earlier in 2005, they released Within a Mile of Home, which featured a much-touted collaboration with Lucinda Williams. (8–9:15 pm)

BUMBRELLA STAGE

recommended KJ SAWKA
For live drum 'n' bass, you can't beat KJ Sawka. The group's octopus-limbed drummer, Kevin Sawka, has astounded veteran music-biz types like Santana's Michael Shrieve, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell, and Amon Tobin with his warp-speed jungle rhythms that have made many a Roland drum machine jealously sputter. You're gonna want to get as close as possible to the stage for this set, as Sawka is as amazing to watch as he is to hear. (12:45–2:15 pm)

LOS AMIGOS INVISIBLES
This outgoing dance band hails from Caracas, Venezuela, but now call New York home, where they record for (and are a highlight of) former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne's Luaka Bop label. As saucy and flirtatious as they are funny, Los Amigos Invisibles elicit wide smiles and booty shakes as they groove with their tongues firmly in someone else's cheek. (3:00–4:15 pm)

recommended CHOKLATE
Local soul singer Choklate is great not only on wax but on the stage. Her group, the Source of Labor Band, is tight, and she knows how to hold it down. Don't even front—Choklate is for real. (5–6 pm)

BRAZILIAN GIRLS
Though their sound is European, Brazilian Girls are actually American (NYC to be precise). No other band on this side of the Atlantic can make euro-pop with the ease and sleaze of Brazilian Girls. As Sabina, the lead singer of the band, says, "Don't stop, don't stop/keep on moving, until I come..." (6:45–8 pm)

MICHAEL FRANTI AND SPEARHEAD
Michael Franti has had a long career—from the Beatnigs (the mid-'80s) to the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy (early '90s) to Spearhead (mid-'90s to today). Though many argue that the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy was Franti's shining moment, only his current band, Spearhead, has produced a real hiphop classic, "People in tha Middle." Franti is admired for his deep and lasting commitment to radical politics. (8:45–10:15 pm)

BLUES STAGE

STICKSHIFT ANNIE WITH KIMBALL AND THE FUGITIVES
Comprising five Northwest music vets, Stickshift Annie traffic in rocking blues, bluesy rock, and jazzy R&B. Fans go bonkers for the vocals of Annie Eastwood, who can reportedly veer from a sultry mewl to a house-rocking holler. (12:15–1:30 pm)

TIM SHERMAN BAND
The Tim Sherman Band are easily the most enigmatic musical act this side of the Gorillaz. Mr. Sherman was once one of three guitarists/vocalists for the Northwest band Transaction (1976–1980) and the Tim Sherman Band provided some stirring music at a 9/11 memorial held in a Presbyterian Church in Tacoma. (2–3:15 pm)

HIGHWAY 99 ALL-STARS
The all-stars are Virginia Klemens, Stacy Jones, John Lee, Hot Rod, Steve Sarkowsky, Jerry Lee Davidson, and Randy Oxford. They promise to deliver a walloping dose of beefy hot blues. (4–5:15 pm)

SONNY LANDRETH
The idiosyncratic blues-slide guitar work of this Louisiana legend has graced records by John Hiatt, John Mayall, and his own fine self. Live, he will escort you to the swampy bayou of your mind. (6–7:15 pm)

BUCKWHEAT ZYDECO
Creole party music from contemporary zydeco's most popular performer, who made his legendary name injecting the classic Creole form with horns, synths, and RAWK! (8–9:30 pm)

BACKYARD STAGE, BROAD STREET LAWN

THE BRADBURY PRESS
The Bradbury Press have shared the stage with artists like the Clumsy Lovers and Tom Landa and the Paperboys. Their latest CD, The Front, is a great showcase of the band's acoustic and sturdy songwriting which incorporates a little bit of jam band with tinges of country and rock and singer Darren Golden's distinctive low voice. (12:45–2 pm)

THE BE GOOD TANYAS
This British Columbia trio have mesmerized crowds on the festival circuit and in small clubs, making every show feel intimate. Their dedication to an old-time Americana is part rustic and part ambient, calling up the downbeat beauty of Townes van Zandt and the finely crafted country precision of the Carter Family. (2:45–4 pm)

THE WAYBACKS
A group that is never afraid to show off its chops, the Waybacks transcend new grass, western swing, and jug band music, as well as jazz and folk. A group possessing a vast knowledge of musical styles, the Waybacks play a significant role in championing the next wave of American acoustic music. Formed in the San Francisco Bay Area, they blend roots music with a style that has drawn comparisons to such righteous pickers as David Grisman, Tony Rice, and Sam Bush. (4:45–6 pm)

recommended OKKERVIL RIVER
Okkervil River's fractured folk tunes interweave hope and helplessness, love and loss, bitterness and epiphany. On paper, some songs read like tearjerkers, but singer Will Sheff's achingly conflicted delivery give them an emotionally evocative intensity that transcends happy or sad. Musically, the band saws at strings to conjure gothic-country gloom, snaring chamber-pop hooks in its rustic barbed-wire trap. (6:45–8 pm)

recommended TEGAN AND SARA
When it comes to the art of sibling rivalry, no one trumps 24-year-old twins Tegan and Sara Quin. Onstage, the power-pop duo cranks out melodic, ridiculously hooky hits while using their downtime to partake in hilarious sisterly spats. It's a good thing, too; with songs as melancholic as theirs, the sisters' comedic talents are a welcome relief. (8:45–10:00 pm)

NW COURT LOUNGE

SEATTLE WOMEN'S JAZZ ORCHESTRA
One of our burg's best big bands, this outfit plays a toe-tapping mix of classics, overlooked tunes, and recent originals that range from Basiesque swing to bop to Latin Jazz. SWOJO includes a sprinkling of men too, but women serve up the lion's share of solos. Keep your ears peeled for alto saxophonist Lisa Gordanier and the deft trumpeter Angela Smith. (Noon–1:15 pm)

UPPER LEFT TRIO
This Portland-based trio of Clay Giberson (piano), Jeff Leonard (bass), and Charlie Doggett (drums) plays straight-ahead jazz that veers off the beaten path often enough to justify their unusual moniker. Leonard, who plays a variety of basses (including a fretless electric) purrs and rumbles under the lyrical, sometimes rollicking, Keith Jarrett-ish piano of Clay Giberson. (2–3:15 pm)

ARTURO RODRIGUEZ QUARTET
Arturo Rodriguez has a passion for percussion and performs his own brand of soulful Latin jazz in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. An accomplished musician, Rodriguez has performed worldwide, sharing the stage with music legends that include Tito Puente, Dave Valentin, Paul Horn, and Pete Escovedo. (6–7 pm)

recommended KEREN ANN
Keren Ann Zeidel mixes up French pop, folk, and triphop for a unique and sophisticated sound that blends Francoise Hardy, Beth Orton, and Portishead. (7:45–9 pm)

EMP SKY CHURCH

recommended POST STARDOM DEPRESSION
Seattle's own Post Stardom Depression released their second full-length record, Prime Time Looks a Lot Like Amateur Night, earlier this year. The distorted garage rock flaunts catchy hooks and a tough attitude with just a touch of punk and glam influence. And when Jeff Angell's whiskey-worn vocals announce, "I'm high fidelity/I'm rock 'n' roll/you should hang a price tag on my soul," you know he means it. (12:15–1:15 pm)

recommended CHARMING SNAKES
A unique blend of post-punk, the Pixies, garage rock, and a little Austin attitude makes Charming Snakes a favorite on the Seattle music scene. Skewed vocals slice through walls of ominous sound one moment and make the fervent call to action for crazy rave-ups the next. (1:45–2:45 pm)

recommended THE COPS
Take one part (ex-)Kinski, one part (ex-)Hello from Waveland, and the collective influences of the Kinks, the Jam, and the Clash, and you have the off-kilter pop-punk goodness enforced by our local Cops. A case of Ritalin couldn't keep these good ol' boys under control. (3:15–4:15 pm)

recommended IDIOT PILOT
Two boys, a heavily distorted guitar, and a laptop are apparently all the tools it takes to write songs that sound like the world has exploded into a burst of flaming stars. Exuding as much energy as humanly possibly, Idiot Pilot's Daniel Anderson and Michael Harris sweep you off your feet with lush melodies and then knock you on your ass with unsympathetic aggression and cocky strut. (4:45–5:45 pm)

recommended KINSKI
"Hot Stenographer," the opening track on Kinski's recent release Alpine Static, evolves in a psychedelic progression from a space-truckin' groove to a droning pattern that could leave listeners drooling in an open-eyed dream-state. The Seattle-based instrumental band explores the entire rock spectrum, incorporating feedback detonations and glass-rose-delicate melodies. Their legendarily loud live sets work as coherent wholes, with every soft-loud dynamic shift, rhythm-driven power surge, and trippy tangent tethered to a majestic master plan. (6:15–7:15 pm)

recommended CANCER RISING
The man who pens The Stranger's My Philosophy column is the same man who raps for Cancer Rising, Larry Mizell Jr. His rich musical background shows through in the act's embrace of brainy hiphop that's got plenty of soul. (8–8:30 pm)

recommendedAYINDE HOWELL
Owner of the excellent veggie restaurant, Quickies Vegan Sandwich Shop, Ayinde Howell is set to throw down some live poetry over hiphop beats. Judging from what we've heard on his debut CD, American Hero Volume 1, Howell is true to the game. (8:40–9:10 pm)

recommended BOOM BAP PROJECT
Man, remember when the Boom Bap Project dropped Circumstance Dictates back in 2001? Yeah, the album was a'ight, but no one expected them to subsequently sign with Rhymesayers, work with the likes of Gift of Gab and Dilated Peoples' Rakaa Iriscience, and bust out Reprogram like indie rap ballers. What's the name of that Big Pun song? Oh yeah... Boom Bap Project, you came up. (9:20–10:05 pm)

BUSKER STAGE, EX-HALL LAWN

ROBERT BLAKE
See Saturday for details. (12–12:45 pm)

CHARLOTTE THISTLE
See Friday for details. (1–1:45 pm)

BABY GRAMPS
See Friday for details. (2–2:45 pm)

SHOEHORN
See Saturday for details. (3–3:45 pm)

JIM HINDE
See Saturday for details. (4–4:45 pm)

AMBER TIDE
See Saturday for details. (5–5:45 pm)

FLOWER ALLEY
See Saturday for details. (7–7:45 pm)

JIM PAGE AND ARTIS THE SPOONMAN
Seattle's beloved Spoonman has been banging spoons on city sidewalks since the early '70s. He's played his utensils next to k.d. lang, Frank Zappa, and Soundgarden (remember "Spoonman"?), and Pete Seeger called him the "best spoon player in the whole damn universe." Jim Page is a local songwriter whose guitar work has been repeatedly described as "free-flowing" and who sings biting and funny social-political critiques. We're assuming they're playing together, the gritty beat of the spoons versus the acute wit of the troubadour. (7–7:45 pm)

LITERATURE

LITERARY STAGE

HAIKU: THE FOUR ELEMENTS
The Haiku Northwest group presents a transcendent reading of sequenced haiku and senryu reflecting the themes of earth, air, fire, and water. (1–1:45 pm)

MARION KIMES: CROSSING BORDERS
The poet Kimes and a bunch of others read their work. The tip-off that it might be unbearable: There will be someone on drums and two women will be "mask bearers." (2–3 pm)

recommended TEA WITH NANCY PEARL
The immortal librarian talks about what books she thinks you should read with Rich Simonson (Elliott Bay Book Company) and Michael Wells (Bailey/Coy Books), while sipping tea. (3:30–4:30 pm)

recommended PHIL CAMPBELL, WITH GUEST GRANT COGSWELL
Phil Campbell has to be given this credit: He managed Grant Cogswell's failed campaign for a city council seat in 2001, and yet was able to sell the story of this minor failure to a major New York publisher, Nation Books. Why would the story of Grant Cogswell's political collapse be of interest to readers outside of Seattle? The answer must exist not outside of the book (the story) but inside (the writing). (4:30–5:30 pm)

POET POPULIST! PRESENTED BY NICK LICATA
The Seattle City Council member will name Seattle's most popular poet, as chosen by everyone who voted. After four finalists read, one lucky duck gets $500. (5:30–6:30 pm)

recommended RENÉ STEINKE, INTRODUCED BY ANN POWERS
Steinke is the author of Holy Skirts, a book that reimagines the story of Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, who lived in New York City back in the day (World War I). The journalist and music critic Ann Powers introduces. (7–8:30 pm)

INK SPOT, SNOQUALMIE ROOM

JAPANESE STAB BINDING
Another chance to learn this painful-sounding technique. (1–1:45 pm)

OFFICE EXPERIMENTS #62
More stylized collaboration with a couple exploded typists. (2–2:45 pm)

LETTERPRESSED FLOWERS
A class on how to smash and mutilate former life. (3–3:45 pm)

OFFICE TRANSLATIONS "J"
Two ladies in business wear explain everything. (4–4:45 pm)

MEMORIAL READING (LED BY CIENNA MADRID)
A reading of work by writers who've died this year, led by Cienna Madrid. Bring something to read. (5–5:45 pm)

THEATER/DANCE

BAGLEY WRIGHT THEATRE

recommended BUTTROCK SUITES
This crowd-pleasing smash melds fierce modern dance with ridiculous '80s crotch rock. (1–2 pm)

recommended SWIVEL PRESENTS: THE INDISCRETIONS ROAD SHOW FEATURING AIMEE BENDER, VENDELA VIDA, ALI DAVIS, ELLEN FORNEY, AND LAUREN WEEDMAN
See preview, page 29. (1–1:45 pm)

STREB
See Saturday for details. (5:45–7:15 pm)

BUMBERSLAM INVITATIONAL, WITH GUEST BEAU SIA AND DJ PHOSHO
It's a wide world filled with all kinds of people, some of whom like slam poetry. It makes most staffers at The Stranger want to stab their eyes out with forks. But if you like it, you're in luck. Tonight's slammers Roger Bonair-Agard, Sonya Renee, and Buddy Wakefield are all award winning. Beau Sia is on hand to "help keep it real." (8:15–10:15 pm)

TheatRE Puget Sound Stage

SPLIT SECOND
See Sunday for details.(2–3:30 pm)

PURDY WOMAN
See Saturday for details. (4 pm–4:45 pm)

recommended LOUD YOGA
The unfunny world of yoga gets ransacked by the hilarious duo of Kevin Joyce and Martha Enson in this participatory performance/demonstration of twisted yoga postures and crackling improv comedy. (5:15 pm–5:45 pm)

SIDNEY SNOOP—ACE DETECTIVE
See Saturday for details. (6:15 pm–7:15 pm)

COMEDY

See preview, page 22.
DAILY

ART

recommended Art of Modern Rock: The Poster Explosion
An exhibit from the collection of Dennis King, one of the authors of the book Art of Modern Rock. King is an internationally recognized authority on contemporary posters, rock and roll posters, graphics, screen prints, and Japanese pop culture artifacts. The exhibit features the work of Frank Kozik, Derek Hess, Lindsey Kuhn, Mark Arminski, Firehouse, Emek, Jermaine Rogers, Justin Hampton, Jeff Kleinsmith, Drowning Creek, Hatch Show Print, the Ames Brothers, Scrojo, and more than 300 others from all over the world. (Olympic Room, noon–8 pm daily)

Bluebottle Art Gallery and Store
Capitol Hill's Bluebottle Art Gallery and Store mixes art and collectibles, toys and functional art. For its Bumbershoot appearance the store showcases its one-of-a-kind art and decorative crafts from Northwest artists. (NW Courtrooms Breezeway, noon–8 pm daily)

Recontextualized Vistas: Concerning Place
Recontextualized Vistas: Concerning Place is a multi-media exhibition made up of eight Eastern/Central Washington artists who work in media ranging from photography and sculpture to video and installation. Curator Donna Stack explores the impact of the physical and psychological barrier posed by the Cascade mountain range and the division of the state into east and west. (Shaw Room, noon–8 pm daily)

recommended In Resonance
This group exhibition highlights the work of national, international, and local luminaries in the field of sound-based art. Eleven artists and artist teams contribute works that challenge medium-specificity with languages, soundscapes, and modeled environments all their own. (Rainier Room, noon–8 pm daily)

Outside In
The always-excellent Kate Seekings of dorkbot-sea curates this group exhibition in which eight artists and creative partnerships from across the U.S. explore environment and our relationship to it through a wide variety of technology-focused media. (Fidalgo Room, noon–8 pm daily)

Raw & ReFIned
Raw & Refined is based on the idea that natural and synthesized materials can be worked together to create entirely unique and different outcomes. With work by Diem Chau, Etsuko Ichikawa, Francis Baker, Jason Wood, Jere Smith, John Grade, Machteld van Buren, and Paula Hayes. (Lopez Room, noon–8 pm daily)

Cell Works
Miyooon has created an explosive catalog of artwork that is both engaging and playful. Miyooon's style possesses both Japanese and American pop-art sensibilities and includes hints of erotic and sensual references. Cell Works is a landscape of brilliant candy-like colors. The artwork ranges from paintings to ceramic sculpture, performance to fashion accessories. Miyooon will be joined by popular Tokyo DJ Carole Hisasue, who will perform live throughout out the run of the exhibit. (Orcas Room, noon–8 pm daily)