Its the American way.
It's the American way. a katz / Shutterstock.com

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David Dayen reports for The New Republic from Philadelphia:

To get to the Democratic National Convention, you take the subway to the AT&T Station and walk to the Wells Fargo Center. Along the way, you’ll stroll by the Comcast Xfinity Live complex, where delegates and honored guests can booze it up. You’ll also see the “Cars Move America” exhibit, an actual showroom sponsored by Ford, GM, Toyota, and others. Finally, you’ll reach your seat and watch Democrats explain why we have to reduce the power of big corporations in America.

Dayen calls the convention "one big corporate bribe."

The Democratic National Committee refuses to disclose who donated the money to fund the convention, Dayen notes. They're simply anonymous. Yesterday at the convention, longtime Clinton ally Terry McAuliffe suggested Hillary Clinton would flip-flop, again, back to supporting the Trans-Pacific Partnership—the "free" trade pact backed by many of the aforementioned corporations. The Chamber of Commerce agrees: Clinton won't follow through on opposing the deal she once advocated for. Trump pounced:


And during the historic roll call vote for Clinton, lobbyists who helped stall gender pay equity legislation cheered from the convention floor, Dayen reports.

There's a reason they call Bill Clinton "Slick Willie." (The nickname originated with a newspaper editor in Arkansas during Clinton's tenure as governor, when he waffled on accepting Cuban refugees). That speech he gave last night, paying loving tribute to his wife? Heartwarming, touching. Also, by the way, Muslim-baiting.

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But, again: Keep your eye on the ball, progressives. Consider all the pretty words, but then look past them and follow the money as best you can. As I've said before:

Adopting insurgent, populist positions that buck the elite consensus will help Democrats tap into the anti-establishment mood among voters and turn out their progressive base. The party will hew to the corporatist center at its peril.

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