The Seattle Department of Transportation hosted a community workshop in June to invite residents and Capitol Hill business owners to discuss how Pike Street and Pine Street could be closed for community events. SDOT is still seeking input.
The Seattle Department of Transportation hosted a community workshop in June to invite residents and Capitol Hill business owners to discuss how Pike Street and Pine Street could be closed for community events. SDOT is still seeking input. ASK

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The Seattle Department of Transportation is still working towards closing parts of Pine Street and Pike Street to cars this September and October. SDOT's latest report (PDF) on the "Pike People Street," released today, included data from residents who took place in a community workshop in June. The report revealed that most residents and local business owners wanted to test out the car-free zones again this year.

According to the report, residents were interested in the streets being used for food vendors and community tables, book and record swaps, and games. Now SDOT is seeking input to figure out how they should close the streets for community activities, a department representative announced in an e-mail this afternoon.

According to the report, community members have three options for how the streets should be closed.

1. Creating activated "nodes," which would turn several street parking spaces on Pike Street and 11th Avenue into small pedestrian zones.

The activated nodes, shown in blue, would be placed along Pike Street and 11th Avenue.
SDOT identified the activated "nodes," shown above in blue, as congested areas, particularly on weekend nights. SDOT

2. "Side saddling" streets, which would close one traffic lane to be used as a pedestrian zone and leaving the other open to cars.

In the side saddle option, a half lane of traffic would still be open for through traffic.
In the "side saddle" option, a half lane of traffic would still be open for through traffic. SDOT

3. Closing larger areas, either whole or half blocks, to car traffic to allow for a bigger space for everything from "community tables, markets, and events" to arts activities.

In a large closure, Pike Street would be closed between 10th Avenue and 11th Avenue. Smaller chunks of 11th Ave. would be closed on either side of Pike St.
In a "large" closure, Pike Street would be closed between 10th Avenue and 11th Avenue. Smaller chunks of 11th Ave. would be closed on either side of Pike St. SDOT

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With those options in mind, SDOT has these questions for you:

1. Which footprint options do you prefer?
2. Which days/times seem best to explore in 2016?
3. Are you interested in participating during testing events or activating the street?

Feedback should be submitted by e-mail to Seth Geiser or phoned in at 206-615-1035 by August 19.