Endorsement Issues: Hating Comic Sans Is Ableist, No New Taxes, Accurate Head Counts

Comments

1
It's not that Comic Sans is always bad. It's great for lemonade stands. The issue is when it's used inappropriately. Not a difficult concept, really--or is pointing that out ableist, too?
2
Hating a font isn't ablist. Going all the way from "I think this font is unattractive" to "you hate dyslexic people" is one giant leap in logic.

Most people don't even know comic sans is used by dyslexic people, and since they dislike it due to its appearance, it's totally unconnected to that unknown fact anyway.

I can't believe I even have to explain that to a *teacher*. Sigh.
3
@2 In all fairness, the article was a bit more interesting than one might anticipate, and it's worth a skim.
4
more like important info sans comic if you ask me (don't tho). context is everything, content is context, buttax crack (tho...). too many people mystery presents the obvious facts (don't).
5
I actually like Comic Sans myself. I think it's a fun font, easy to read, nice and clear. But I have been persuaded by others that it is not the font to use in normal communications.

I really don't think people who don't like it are ableist. I think most just don't know how it can help those with dyslexia.

So thanks for the interesting article link; I learned something today.

6
Still, there has to be a nonproprietary font with the same legibility or better.
7
I think everyone is tired of hearing "thinking X makes you guilty of Y-ism". If it's applicable in any real-life context, let me know. Otherwise let's stop giving a damn about melting snowflakes with innocuous harm-intent-free online speech.
8
What @2 said.

Disliking an unserious, childish font that looks like balloon animals filled with weak farts does not make anyone "ableist". I am genuinely glad Comic Sans accidentally helped so many folks with its unfortunate ubiquity.

There are fonts that were actually designed for dyslexia and other readability issues, and other "normal" fonts also accidentally happen to meet those needs.

http://www.readandspell.com/us/best-font…

https://bdatech.org/what-technology/type…
9
Hating Comic Sans is about the only thing it should be OK to really, truly, deeply hate.
10
Hating Com Sans is the Comic Sans of hating stuff.
11
From the article:

"Comic Sans is one of a few typefaces recommended by influential organizations like the British Dyslexia Association..."

From the British Dyslexia Association:

"Publishers often ask the British Dyslexia Association which typeface dyslexic people prefer, for PDF files, web and print. For word-processed files on-screen, they like set their own preferences of style, size, colour and background colour, though it may upset the pagination, so MS Word is the most useful format.

Some dyslexic people have expressed strong feelings about typefaces, but there is no agreement apart from saying it should be sans serif. This document and all B.D.A. tech pages are in Verdana.

We asked dyslexia forum members. Only a few people responded. So it may not be a burning issue for most dyslexic people...

Comic Sans is the most popular Microsoft font for children. However, some dyslexic adults consider it looks childish. They love it or hate it. It was designed for comic strips. It is not considered professional in the publishing or academic worlds. There is even a ‘ban comic sans’ web! It meets all dyslexic ‘likes’ except mirrored b and d."

https://bdatech.org/what-technology/type…
12
Shame on you Dan.

"Fonts that help Dyslexia" is straight psuedo-science. How could that not ring an alarm bell for you??

I feel bad for the kids, not only do they have a hard time reading, but their teacher is an idiot to boot. Tough combo.
13
"an helpful"? Oh go away, your grammar offends me.
14
"I really don't think people who don't like it are ableist. I think most just don't know how it can help those with dyslexia."

Sure, and that's how a lot of default ableism works: just didn't know, never thought about that, etc. So ableism in, ableism out. No need to feel guilty about it unless you double down and refuse to listen when you could learn something.

Just anecdotally, of dyslexic people I know, only one cares about Comic Sans specifically. But he says he's experimented and it works for him.
15
@13 I'm just going to assume the guy says 'elpful.
16
I hate this Comic Sans article more than I hate anything. You can't cure a learning disability with a dumb font. Here is a better article. https://creativemarket.com/blog/is-comic…
17
@11 their style guide http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/common/cke… recommends it even to this day:

Font.
 Use a plain, evenly spaced sans serif font such as Arial and Comic Sans.
Alternatives include Verdana, Tahoma, Century Gothic, Trebuchet.
 Font size should be 12-14 point. Some dyslexic readers may request a larger font.
 Use dark coloured text on a light (not white) background.
 Avoid green and red/pink as these are difficult for colour-blind individuals.
For more detailed information and discussion on fonts, see the BDA New Technologies
Committee website: http://bdatech.org/what-technology/typef…

what seems to be the bigger issue is the classism (not that you'd read that on theestablishment.co shucks!) and ageism against the clear, comfortable, easy-on-the-eyes font comic sans. wake up sheeple.
18
The whole "Comic Sans helps dyslexia" thing is really more urban legend than science, though.
19
I don't personally use or really care for Comic Sans, it has its uses though, and I'm no font fascist like anyone who wants to actually get rid of it. Why bother? There are far more important issues in the world. Just use another font.

I had no idea dyslexics relied on it, and more power to them for that, no matter how many or few.

Trebuchet was designed by the same guy who designed Comic Sans, and it's a lovely font, not the best in the world, and there are things I'd change about it, but it gentle and serviceable. One of my faves for daily use (eg. email, some documents). Times New Roman is largely boring, but sometimes practical. Although there are other, nicer serif fonts out there for newsy, or formal looking documents. Just don't use Democratica, it's too obvious now. It was cool when it came out, but it's kinda dated at this point.

Just to piss off most people in this thread, The Stranger should publish an issue where the cover and all the article titles are done in Comic Sans... :>D

Although I suppose controversy for controversy's sake is trite. I like The Stranger's name logo font anyway, it's a good choice. IMHO.