High school students testified at todays King County Council hearing regarding a resolution supporting their march for gun reform this Saturday.
High school students testified at today's King County Council hearing regarding a resolution supporting their march for gun reform this Saturday. King County Council

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Similar to a Seattle City Council resolution passed in support of student gun reform activist walkouts, the King County Council voted this afternoon to support students' March for Our Lives rally this coming Saturday. The council additionally urged Congress to "ban assault-style weapons" and the Washington State Legislature to repeal the state's law preempting local governments from passing their own firearm rules.

Still, even though the measure passed, the three Republican King County Council members voted against it. Council Member Kathy Lambert, who represents Duvall, North Bend, Snoqualmie, and Fall City, said she thought the state's preemption law was a good idea. Lambert also said she wished more people would talk about the safety of school buildings' designs.

"I think as we go through all of this, one of the things we really need to be looking at is: We're doing a policy that's making kids less safe and I don't think we're talking about this properly," Lambert said.

"I think we need to be thinking about all these policies when we say all these buildings need to be taller and bigger with more staircases," Lambert said. "To me that's just not safe."

Council Member Joe McDermott, a Democrat who ran for Congress two years ago, pushed back and said that guns should be at the top of the agenda. "School design is far down the list," he said.

State legislators introduced a bill this year to get rid of the state's preemption law, but it died in committee. The National Rifle Association fought the passage of a Seattle law to tax firearms, arguing that it violated the same state principle. The Washington State Supreme Court disagreed, and upheld the law.