Lawsuit From The Stranger Forces Federal Court to Be Transparent About Electronic Surveillance

Comments

1

How is the court going to handle reporting of sealed cases and/or sealed applications for search warrants?

2

Good.

3

Fantastic news, fantastic work.

4

Thank you, I feel a little less shitty about all the time I waste on this web site.

5

cool! I read this in google

6

Great news. And let's not forget that thanks largely due to the efforts of ACLU-WA, the City of Seattle now (as of Sept 2017) has one of the strongest surveillance technology review processes in the country. Ordinance 125376 (https://www.seattle.gov/tech/initiatives/privacy/surveillance-technologies/about-surveillance-ordinance) mandates that all new technologies acquired by SPD, City Light, SDOT, Seattle Fire, and other city agencies are evaluated to determine whether they fall under the ordinance's definition of surveillance technologies. If so, they must undergo a review and public comment process that includes assessment of data retention and sharing policies, system security and, importantly, civil liberties and privacy concerns, particularly for communities that have been most impacted by bias in the criminal justice system.

The first rounds of reviews have already been conducted, which included SPD ALPR (automated license plate reader), SDOT traffic cameras, and SFD incident recordings. While it may not be what most people want to do in their spare time, I'd encourage all Seattle residents to get involved in the process -- read the impact reports (https://www.seattle.gov/tech/initiatives/privacy/privacy-reviews), and participate in the next round of the public comment process, which will likely start in February/March.