Colman and corgis. It doesnt get better than this, folks.
Colman and corgis. It doesn't get better than this, folks. Netflix
Biggest news first—Netflix has finally announced when The Crown is coming back: November 17, nearly two full years after season two. (Unusually for Netflix, this is a Sunday, not a Friday, the day of the week they typically unload new content so as to make for easy weekend binging.)

Support The Stranger

The third season of the sumptuous, elegant drama, which follows the life of Queen Elizabeth II, features new actors taking over the main roles to signify the passage of time. Olivia Colman will be the new queen (for more on the greatness of Colman, read this), and she'll be joined by Tobias Menzies (Edmure Tully in Game of Thrones) as Prince Philip, Helena Bonham Carter as Princess Margaret, and Jason Watkins as Harold Wilson. The third season of The Crown will reportedly cover the years 1964 to 1977. Here's a very skimpy teaser.



Also arriving later this year, although we still don't know exactly when, is Apple TV+'s The Morning Show, which dropped its first teaser trailer this morning. The series goes behind the scenes of a fictitious morning show and stars Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, and Steve Carell. The trailer gives us very little to go on (or get excited about), featuring the disembodied voices of its stars over a camera wandering around a morning-show set. As far as when Apple TV+ will launch and what it will cost, nobody except Apple knows. It will supposedly materialize this fall.



In spite of all this future-casting, there's still way too much to watch on TV right now. This past weekend alone was jam-packed, with the very good third season of GLOW and the conspiracy/religion pseudo-documentary series The Family dropping on Netflix on Friday, as well as the finale of Showtime's Roger Ailes/Fox News takedown The Loudest Voice and the second-season premiere of the excellent Succession both airing Sunday night. There's no rest for a dedicated TV watcher, either. Tonight, AMC kicks off the second seasons of two of its best shows: the laid-back, casual Lodge 49, which stars the infinitely charming Wyatt Russell and inhabits a vibe of Pynchon-meets-Lebowski-at-half-speed; and The Terror: Infamy, about which I wrote:
Although Infamy has zero connection, plot-wise, to the positively brilliant first season of anthology series The Terror, the second season's milieu of Japanese internment camps during World War II sounds like an edifying (and terrifying) lens to tell a fascinating historical drama via horror-genre tropes—as that great first season did.