Why Blade Runner Got So Much of the Future We Are Now In (November 2019) Wrong

Comments

2

"In Blade Runner, there are no smartphones, no internet"

This can be said of any science fictional work back then. God, you're such a shittier thinker than you fancy yourself to be

5

The more precisely we know where something is, the less likely we are to know where it is going.

6

Fucking gummint regulations, keeping MY replicants off planet Earth.

7

LA is hugely industrial. There is a steel mill, aerospace, machine shops, carbon fiber factories, metal stamping plants, the biggest anodizer in the world, powder coaters, foundries, and they make everything from motorcycles to milling machines there. It is not visible to the casual visitor on Sunset. But LA is 100 miles by 100 miles, and is one of the top 2 or 3 manufacturing areas in the USA. You gotta go east of the 5, or south of the 10, to see it- out of white people terrritory. But its there.

8

Not to scare you Charles, but today you sound a bit like the futurist George Gilder, President Reagan's most quoted living author. To scare you even more you also channel the Calvinist contradiction of predestination and free will. :)

9

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GX6GMulgCIU

10

Forgot to add the themes of time and fate in Gabriel García Márquez' 100 Years of Solitude. How do people not enjoy your articles?

11

Blade Runner is a movie about 1982, not a movie about 2019.

13

More importantly, #7, there is Rooster Sauce.

*could have sworn I saw some in one of those incredibly detailed Ridley Scott LA 2019 scenes....

14

In the late ‘90s, Wim Wenders screened his personal copy of “Until The End of The World” at UW. Released in 1991, set in 1999, this vision of the future was already obsolete. Wenders himself pointed out how the characters never reference the internet — which is all anyone was doing in the actual late ‘90s.

15

All Blade Runner showed us was that Sean Young was too batshit crazy to be brought back in real life for the sequel. Ridley Scott must still be thanking himself for making her a replicant.

16

So Charles, you arguments about what's going on today is biased on a 1982 movie? Alien has some tech problems too.

17

Uh - it probably missed a few things because it was based on a novel written in the 1960s. And yeah, that 1960s author didn’t predict mobile phones or the internet. He did, however, predict driverless cars, ecological disaster and the potential for androids, which is not bad for a guy writing 50 or so years ago.

18

I enjoyed the movie, for what it was, a movie designed to entertain.
It really had very little in common with the book.
In the book, Deckard is eager to retire the replicants, because he wants to buy a fancy new pet. He is also married, and he kills his replicant girlfriend after she kills his new pet goat.

In the book, the humans think they are more empathetic then their replicant creations; but by the end of the book you come to realize that both the humans and their replicants slaves are nothing more than selfish beasts.

19

The cost of observation may drop precipitously if you consider a multi-dimensional perspective. For instance, in Flatland, the cost of observing much on an entire plane of two-dimensional existence is relatively much lower for an observer in three-dimensional space.

❤️ your writing.

20

Dammit. Now I'm wondering if I'll be able to visit Delos and get attacked by Yul Brynner.