Hundreds of UW Medical Residents Plan to Call in Sick This Friday

Comments

2

And who will take up the slack? As usual the nurses and other staff.

3

I hope @1 catches a snow cold next week.

4

@1 I thought I was supposed to hate drug and insurance companies? Now I am supposed to hate underpaid employees but not their employers? So hard to keep up.

5

@1 Go work 30 hours on call with psychotic, violent, pissed, and dying people in pain who are shitting, pissing, and tossing their cookies all over the fucking place. Then do it again. Do more with less. Get paid fast food wages for the hours your put in. Then once they start paying you, pay most of your salary in malpractice insurance and covering your ass.

6

@2 As usual?? Very edgy take but I hope you stand up for residents and ancillary staff who put in extra hours every time there is a nursing strike, while is100s of times more common. This is literally the first strike If it’s kind in many, many years, by a population of young doctors who are clearly taken advantage of by hospital administration and you come with this BS. Unbelievable.

7

@2 In most hospital systems, nurses get mandated breaks and are compensated much more than training physicians with less responsibility/liability. I frequently have to wait for my patient’s nurse to “come back from break” to continue an intervention for my very sick patient — I am not afforded the same luxury as a training physician and have to be on/available at all times (often forgetting to pee for >15hrs and living off of hospital graham crackers — and then getting scolded by nurses for eating the graham crackers...). Not saying nurses don’t work hard, but there’s no use highlighting another problem to try to downplay a glaringly terrible one.

8

@1 residents don’t make money for specific medical services... ask your hospital CEOs and insurance company where that money is going (hint: it ain’t going to my $300k+ debt with 7.2% interest rates...)

9

@2 I can’t recall. When was the last time UW medical center nurses went on strike?

10

@9 when was the last time residents ANYWHERE went on strike? Nurses have gone on strike twice in the last four years at my local academic hospital. Guess who came in early for work before, after, and during both - without overtime (spoiler: residents).

Unionizing and striking can be an appropriate way to address inequity and injustice. Either support it for all employees or none but residents have earned the right of muses have.

11

@7 15 hours without a piss as you wait for a nurse to return from break? You must be on the same exaggeration train as @6 who thinks there has been 100’s of strikes by UW nurses.

12

@11 No worries, I’d try avoid to addressing my points if I were in your position too. Luckily this is still happening and it is a great first step for residents everywhere for whom unions are still rare and striking has universally not been an option.

13

@7. I am impressed by not peeing for greater than 15 hours! I would not have thought that humanly possible.

14

@13 you’ve clearly never met a surgical resident... I’ve had plenty of days where I get home (after working 5:30am-8:30pm) and realized “oops I didn’t pee all day.” The fact that you believe that’s not humanly possible kind of makes my point even stronger. Residents are constantly pushing their bodies to unhealthy limits because that’s how the system is set up. We don’t eat, we don’t hydrate, we don’t get time off to see a doctor, we work while ill, etc — all to keep caring for patients in a system that disregards our mental/physical health — it’s inhumane and it’s time someone stick up for it. THATS THE WHOLE POINT OF THIS ARTICLE/MOVEMENT.