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As Twitter was eating up or passing on this new Grande Gaga jam, many pointed out the music video's aesthetic debts to Bayonetta, the 1980s, vaporwave, drag, the standard lite BDSM that now accompanies all pop stylings, and the city of Miami in general.

But I was shocked that no one pointed out the song's glaringly obvious allusion to Jaswinder Bolina's 2013 poem, "Portrait of the Horse," which concludes its smart and mopey lines of introspection with the similarly masochistic sentiment: "I should be rained on. / I should not be forgiven."

If you really want the deep knowledge on this song, look for Bolina's poem in his book, Phantom Camera, available at your local bookstore. While you're shopping, pick up his newer collection, The 44th of July. In that one you'll find "Epistemic Love Poem," which serves as a nice counter to "Portrait of the Horse."

But for now, the horse:

• Bolina begins the poem with a nod to the famous phrase probably falsely attributed to Freud, and then runs with its logic, moving associatively from idea to idea: "Sometimes the horse is simply a horse. // Sometimes the horse is a stalwart / bearer of bodies. // Sometimes the horse is stubborn, / refusing to ford the river..." As the possible replacements for "horse" pile up, the reader begins to understand that the horse is a figure for lack, some puzzle-piece of the self the speaker can't find within and so tries to find in others. Twenty-somethings know what I'm talking about.

• The speaker knows this rummaging for the self in others, which is sometimes simply called dating, can be disastrous, leading to mornings where the silence between him and his date is "filled / with less than remorse / but with more than indifference." But what can he do? As much as language allows the word "horse" to change its stripes, the speaker sadly realizes he can't seem to change his own. He's the "self unable to alter its ineffable horse," destined to live an unfulfilling life, or a life full of, as the speaker aptly puts it, "What I decided in place of what I needed." Rather than dismiss his mistreatment of others with some sort of cowboy narrative of lovin' 'em and leavin' 'em, the speaker takes the path of Gaga, of Grande: "I should be rained on. / I should not be forgiven."

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• This is just an appreciation bullet for the following lines, which I love for their music as much as for their meaning:

I mistake the strange bodies
for those I owe apologies to,

oversleep and open my eyes on
the clock radio, the time a typo,

the apartment a disaster.