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At 6:30 p.m. PDT this evening, Tin House will host "the best reading in all of time and space," featuring Jenny Zhang, Tommy Pico, Morgan Parker, and Khadijah Queen.

That event description is no lie. Together, these four poets compose the most formidable millennial poetry transformer anyone could possibly imagine. To prepare yourself, you should read Morgan Parker's prose poem, "Now More Than Ever," which you can find in her latest collection of poetry, Magical Negro, available at local bookstores.

A few notes:

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• In the poem, Parker's speaker adopts the role of an anthropologist explaining the underlying logic of a phrase, in this case one used most often by "politically liberal but socially comfortable" Whites. In doing so she flips the bird at the imperial tradition of white anthropologists parachuting into black and brown communities and writing creepy books about their habits, and also helpfully/humorously puts whiteness under the lens for once.

• The speaker uses the role to keep her distance from the subject as she expertly analyses the assumptions buried in the titular phrase, "now more than ever." When this class of whites use this phrase, she argues, they reveal that they have heard but not really listened to what Black people have been telling them about their own experiences. They also simultaneously reveal that they more or less swim in an ocean of ahistoricity, and that a black person's "usefulness...is married to [their] misfortune." The speaker keeps the tone precise and scientific until the very end, when she unravels into the repetition of the phrase "and ever, and ever, and ever..." which offers an emotional release and cleverly embodies in language the sad circular cycle of pain Black Americans have been trapped in since 1619.

• The last time I saw her perform this poem at Hugo House, Parker turned the final words—"and ever, and ever, and ever..."—into a kind of monologue. She sang them, she growled them, she screamed them, she whispered them, and then she walked offstage and straight out the door of the auditorium. It was a dramatic conclusion to an incredible performance, and it'll be interesting to see how her power and elan translate to Zoom.