It's High Time to Decriminalize Psychedelics in Seattle

Just let the hippies have it. Shouldn't be that big of a deal.

Comments

1

"As it stands, law enforcement doesn't handle tons of these cases anyway. A spokesperson at the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office said referrals or charged cases "solely involving psychedelics are quite rare," amounting to "maybe a couple cases a year, and almost certainly less than a half dozen."

This is really all anyone needs to know about this issue. I stopped reading Rich's lengthy screed at that point.

2

"We need systemic change, we need to educate the people about racial equity and what it is to be in community and not having this extractionist-type mentality that’s depleting everything."

well
it's just
Capitalism

but yeah
ya don't gotta
wait till ya get to
Heaven* to chat w/God

*I gather it's
a Rather Exclusive club
or was that The Rapture...

3

That's a great write-up Rich--including that wild 4th paragraph sentence! Good weekend!

4

These are all nice stories, but really I’d like to put an end to sh*tty dealers selling dangerous drugs to our kids. Legalize, regulate them. No more death from a single pill.

5

@4 -- remember the Sacklers?

speaking of Drugs Dealers
Corporations and Gov't 'oversight.'

6

Feel free to come watch the stereo with me.
Hi I'm Steve, Steve Shittalker state approved trip sitter.
Daylight basement, lotsa vinyl.
$125 per head, max party of six.

7

Shall we go, You and I, while we can
Through the transitive nightfall of diamonds?

8

While some might say this isn't necessary because Pete Holmes "has pretty much decriminalized it anyway", many medical practitioners have trouble prescribing these incredibly medicines without some legal guidance in place.

Furthermore, it sends a message to both state and federal officials that the winds are changing and they need to get with the times.

9

"Last year 56% of Oregon voters approved an initiative to legalize psilocybin mushrooms for medical use. And in the last couple of years, lawmakers in Denver, Oakland, Washington D.C., Santa Cruz, a county in Michigan, and some college towns in Massachusetts decided to decriminalize psychedelic drugs altogether."
Well, for sure, it's a brand new Tax Revenue.

I'm not against most psychedelics, I toyed with them in my youth, rite of passage sort of thing.
Never found them enlightening, always felt that I just played a trick on my brain. I did learn I didn't need those drugs because big circus was already there. I hardly met anyone who said it took them to some sort of insight or new wisdom in their lives that didn't fade over time.
Problem is psychedelics can mix with Alcohol and that can be a bad mix. If it does help some people, great as long as its supervised and regulated. Self medication doesn't work, just look at the streets.

10

Yes! No addiction potential or real overdose potential. Also, shitty drugs(psychedelics)for pure escapism because they pull you into a new clarity of introspection that can be particularly scary for some but most people can benefit from a short experience of utter ego destruction. Bad for burying your problems under.

11

ya don't 'Bury' your problems
well maybe you do if you treat these
Powerful drugs like an Amusement Park Ride
problems're ... put into . . . perspective I suppose

this shit Works
but Hell yes it's
Not for Everyone

"Self medication doesn't work, just look at the streets."
--@jakky

you wanna ban Alcohol?
Okay! excellent -- it's thee
most Dangerous Drug out there.

I know WAY more alcoholics
then psychedelics users and I
know whose company I'd prefer.

12

@10
otherwise yes

13

Probably the only time I will ever agree with Richie boy.

14

All that stuff should be legal: herbs, heroin, LSD, mushrooms, and so forth.

Apparently people are able to obtain this contraband no matter what, so we may as well legalize it and reduce the caseload for law-enforcement. This is the same principle behind the gun-control canard in that gun fanciers are able to obtain firearms regardless of federal regulations, in fact like drugs, many users are able to manufacture their own stuff.

We should impose some sort of age regulation like 21 and over, the principle being that if you're an adult you're mature enough to deal with the implicit hazards of drug use.

15

Well, since I don't do them anymore, and they're about to be legal, I'll tell you where to pick magic mushrooms by the pound. The entire campus of Seattle University is full of them every fall up to about Halloween.. Not just part of it- all of it. Anywhere there is bark mulch and shade, you will find cyanescens, which are the most potent mushroom around. I found a grocery bag full in the bark in front of the school book store once. Just read a book and look at some pictures before you go try it out. Also, the bark mulch that Seattle U uses is organic, I talked to Ciscoe Morris at a gardening convention and asked him if he made the specific mulch to grow mushrooms on purpose, and he was surprised to find out that he created the largest mushroom garden in Seattle. Just read a book and look at pictures, because there are also deadly poisonous mushrooms that grow there as well.

16

THNX
Abby!

(post-
Legalization
look for all the
fascists to figure
some way of making
these Mother-Nature-
supplied Tools impotent.

after all they cannot
Compete with Her in the
Marketplace of free Ideas.)

18

Something other than Schedule 1. Because all that does is scare away legitimate sources where some sort of quality control can be applied. And attracts organized crime. And gets your stuff laced with Fentanyl.

You will probably need a prescription. So your usage can be 'monitored'. But plenty of Dr Feelgoods will step in to fill that role.

19

I don't have a problem with legalization of psychedelics. They aren't for me but I know a few people that I trust that say they have been beneficial to them.

20

I couldn't imagine just casually doing psychedelics daily. But hey, I'm not gonna stop everyone from having their own personal fun. As long as they aren't hurting anyone or themselves, whats the harm?