Comments

1

Not sure how to square this:

"The amount of money we will spend on hiring more officers to patrol 'hot spots,' on prosecutors to file those cases, on public defenders to defend them, on judges to hear them would be so much better spent on housing people and meeting their needs,"

With this:

"According to SPD’s latest annual crime report, last year officers were most often dispatched to Rainier Valley Square in South Seattle, the Target downtown, Harborview Medical Center, Westwood Village in West Seattle, DESC Hobson Place, supportive housing in the Judkins Park neighborhood, and Addison Apartments in Pioneer Square."

If providing public housing reduces crime, why are public housing developments among the most frequent locations for criminal activity?

2

After the 40 shots fired in might the other day in cap hill, we need some sort of citywide recorded video surveillance so we can find dangerous and stop offenders to keep the city safe. Cameras don’t lie, and monitoring would act as a deterrent.

3

It has never worked.

Didn't work in the 1980s.
Didn't work in the 1990s.
Didn't work in the 2000s.
Didn't work in the 2010s.
Didn't work in the 2020s.
Still doesn't work.

And seeing 12 police cars harassing people who appeared to be profiled for possibly being homeless in the South Lake Union neighborhood on Sunday ... that doesn't work either.

4

(also saw them in the Belltown and Westlake mall area but you always see cop cars harassing homeless people there)

5

This guy was housed and he still hit some lady in the back of the head with a baseball bat for no reason. https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/law-justice/seattle-man-charged-with-assault-accused-of-hitting-a-woman-with-baseball-bat-in-belltown/

These things don't have to be mutually exclusive. You can continue to work to house people and when people act like assholes they should be held accountable.

6

What is wrong with holding criminals responsible for their actions?

8

@3&@4: I think you're appearing overemphatic to justify your narrative. I suggest a dash of nuance.

9

@6 yes, exactly. That is somehow too mean and disproportionately something or other towards criminals.

11

“…is their current strategy effective? We haven't really seen results. The same crowds and types of crimes continue to happen," sounds like their problem is with the city council rather than with the police. How about we try something new. Let’s have the council say… let the police enforce the law (see law enforcement: definition) budget and hire the right amount of police for a city this size, put cops on the street + in the community and deal out real consequences for ALL crimes. What do you say Stranger, maybe we try something different than the touchy-feely bullshit that is yielding no results at all and only dilutes the concept of legality? Or do nothing and have you continue to bitch about the ineffectiveness of the police while at the same time working up excuses for various levels of crime? Never mind, I believe I know what feeds you.

12

@5 the video is much more 'interesting'
https://komonews.com/news/local/video-shows-woman-being-attacked-by-man-with-baseball-bat-in-seattles-belltown

13

@5, @12. I understand this… let’s call him “person” is in custody. If he’s proven guilty, he should be given a sentence that causes him and his family commensurate pain to what his victim is going to face from this point forward. Punish the behavior and pay for all expenses. If he’s not able to, his family should, by all means necessary. Then, have the press report on the outcome of the case. Every time they report on an egregious crime, they should immediately have to follow up with an update of the sentencing.

14

@5 and @12

Holy crap!

Has Dan Satterberg apologized to Wantez J. Tulloss, for the inconvenience and trauma of the arrest?

Surely Mr. Tulloss is not responsible for his actions and should be released immediately as there is no reason to add to his lifelong trauma by forcing him to face charges.

/s

15

@13 why punish his family?

He acted alone. His family (father, mother, brother, sister, wife, child) has nothing to do with this.

There is no reason to punish his family.

16

Oh Hannah, stressful to report such human failings over & over.

17

@16 that’s why she does the tilty head thing - just too much weight.

18

Maybe Harrell isn't "tough on crime" and you clowns just branded him as such?
Maybe he is a reasonable person who thinks some people belong in jail, others maybe can get a second chance?
Does that seem reasonable, or totally unfair and "tough"?
I see how this term is going to play-out, you giving Harrell the damned if he do, damned if he don't treatment because petty and jelly.
Y'all suck...

19

Well... I suppose we could do nothing. Or make excuses as to why these folks are simply misunderstood, victims, somehow not responsible for their misdeeds/behavior... or some other such nonsenses...

Oh, wait that is what we have done for the past 8 years.

The consequences of this failed "do nothing policy" is pretty evident.

20

Downtown along 3rd, as well as outside Target, is already looking much better. I advise Little Saigon to maybe give it some more time. There are not enough social workers and they don't get paid enough, so all that is just performative talk that will lead to nothing.

21

Why do we need police? I thought we had an army of social workers ready and able to handle these sorts of things. Wasn't that the promise made when we defunded SPD?

LOL

22

SPD was not defunded.

23

@16 were there too many direct quotes from City officials, lawyers and spokespeople? Was it too much to get quotes from community activists who are on their feet in the neighborhood? Was there too much data?

24

@21 Exactly.... That was the promise. An army of social workers, untested, with no history of success, no planning or direction would be unleashed and all our social ills would be resolved.

It was right out of the play book for ...$15 now, that was supposed to lift everybody out of poverty and provide a living wage for all. Now a person working for $15/hour can't even get an apartment let alone a Big Mac. (Hamburgers are now approaching $20..with fries of course)

25

SO many Strawmen that the above comment is flammable. Not to mention utterly filled with bovine excrement.

So I guess we go back to $7.25 an hour and somehow the circle of the market will finally work after 30 years! but we don't have to because the $15 an hour min wage hike did help Seattle's working people significantly. Not only is unemployment low at 3.3% despite the pandemic it was even LOWER pre-pandemic immediately following the wage hike.

By your logic cities in low min wage Red states would have lower poverty rates. This should come as no surprise to you - they do not.

Seattle's poverty rate is 10.26% (and falling) as compared to low min wage Red State cities like Dallas ($7.25 an hour) which is a whopping 21.8%. Georgia's min wage is $5.15 its poverty rate is about 17%.

Also: Dicks Drive in Hamburger costs $2.10. A dicks Deluxe costs $4.50.
A Red Mill Hamburger costs $5.50.
A Big Mac in Seattle costs about $6.40.

That's whole lot of Hamburger options for less than $20.

Perhaps you are referring to Donald Trump's infamous "Hamberder?" Perhaps those are more expensive? He is a billionaire (so he says) after all.

26

All you motherfuckers need a hug. A really really tight one.

27

@25... It seems you haven't been out lately....perhaps you didn't notice all the homeless folks, a city riddled with crime, a downtown which is simply abandoned.

I guess the point was -$15 Now was supposed to lift everybody out of poverty and provide a living wage for all. Everybody could afford their rent, food...etc.

Where is your Messiah Now....? (The Mythical $15 Now God)

28

Sounds like that defund the police gimmick has some remorseful buyers…


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