Yet another reporter files yet another massive story about ten-foot-tall aliens growing pot on public lands—this time in Kittitas County—without pausing to ask why people are growing pot on public lands or bothering to get a quote from someone on the other side. But SFCH Chelsea Krotzer finds plenty of space for the mindless glorification of costly and futile police work:

Myers is preparing for more this year, but he and the special team are prepared, thanks to the marijuana eradication program. The 10-man, multi-jurisdictional program trains law enforcement from the Washington State Patrol, Sheriff's Offices, state Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Service to respond to marijuana grows across the state.

Myers is part of that team, representing Kittitas County with a handful of Sheriff's deputies. "Our members have been trained in the various divisions of the program," Myers said. "We have a reconnaissance portion of the team, which is both ground and air, and we also have the eradication and arrest teams established."

Krotzer doesn't tell us how much that "10-man, multi-jurisdictional" squad costs taxpayers. And that reconnaissance portion of the program—ground and air—can't be cheap. Is pot any harder to find or any more expensive in Ellensburg or Washington state now than it was before this program was created? I'm guessing not. And while no one should be growing anything on public lands—or grazing anything—there's just one way to put a stop to marijuana grows on public lands: allow people to grow it on farms.