Let us take a look at last month's weather to see where we would rather be.

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July in New York City, a.k.a. "the Big Apple" (Washington state leads the nation in apple production, and has done so since the 1920s):

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  • weather.com

My goodness: 102°. That is very warm. July in New York City was rife with temperatures such as 96°, 92°, 95°, 98°. And recall that, famously, it's not the heat—it's the humidity.

This July in Seattle, a.k.a. the Jet City (big ups, Boeing!): an average temperature of a pleasant 75°. Precipitation: 0.34 inch (why, that's less rain than in New York City! Imagine that!). Humidity: Nil.

One does not even break a sweat in July in Seattle when climbing one of our fair city's picturesque hills* to take in the view of the two even more picturesque mountain ranges—the Olympics to the West and the Cascades to the East**—and the even-more-picturesque-than-that-if-such-a-thing-is-possible bodies of water***.

Truly, summertime in Seattle is superior to anytime anywhere else.

*New York City has no hills, meaning your calves are lumpen where ours are shapely.
**Let those names roll off your tongue for a moment: Olympics. Cascades. Cooling, no?
***Namely, icy Puget Sound, full of Dungeness crabs and pearl-making oysters, gateway to the mighty (and cold) Pacific; Lake Union, glittering with sailboats; and gigantic, gorgeous Lake Washington, sharer of our great state's namesake and ready to be plunged into should we feel like a refreshing swim.