In Washington, people who earn an average of $11,000 a year currently pay 17.3 percent of their income in taxes, but people who earn $1.8 million a year pay only 2.6 percent of their income in taxes. Its like a sliding scale thats sliding in the wrong direction.
  • Aaron Huffman
  • In Washington, people who earn an average of $11,000 a year currently pay 17.3 percent of their income in taxes, but people who earn $1.8 million a year pay only 2.6 percent of their income in taxes. It's like a sliding scale that's sliding in the wrong direction.

Sponsored
Judge Doug North, a Proponent of Diverting Non-Violent First-Time Offenders into Treatment Programs, is Endorsed by The Stranger
Click here to see what people are saying about Judge North.

Paid for by Committee to Reelect Judge North, P.O. Box 27113, Seattle, WA 98165

The numbers behind the push for an income tax on rich Washingtonians are hard to argue with—or maybe they're not?

Commenter Looking For a Better Read says:

Not a single nickel more in taxes until the state can show that it is spending current tax revenues efficiently and effectively. Every agency should be subjected to an independent efficiency review to determine if we, the taxpayers, are getting value for our dollar.

In the private sector, we are required every so often to prove that we are using the resources we're given effectively. The public sector should have to do the same, but tell me—when was the last time this happened?

Commenter lopes says:

"It's the price of civilized society."

This is precisely right. I am a single home owner with no children who pays a BUNCH of money every year in property taxes. Much of that tax money goes to pay for public schools. Why should I pay that money if I have no children using those public schools? Why? Because that is the price I pay for living in a society where we need educated people to make everything work. I might not be using the dollars directly, but I am getting direct benefit...

Pretty simple, really.

Commenter Brian in Seattle says:

I have a problem with any income tax proposed by people with money already. If it's all such a good idea, why aren't they writing the state a check to cover the deficit voluntarily??

Support The Stranger

Oh wait, most of Bill Gates Sr's money is probably in property, assets, and other foundations and he doesn't give one damn about this initiative because he gets a nice tax cut on all his assets. Meanwhile, anyone who actually does well in life and starts getting up into the upper middle class gets fucked over thus keeping them from ever competing with someone of Bill Gates' wealth.

Dive into the tax-the-filthy-rich-fracas here.

Sponsored
Find Out How Seattle’s Westland Distillery Is Turning The World Of Whiskey Upside Down.
Get to know the world-renowned whiskey distillery in your own backyard.